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[l] at 11/15/19 4:00pm
NMSU to host discussion panel on educational lawsuit ruling

Date: 11/15/2019
Writer: Faith Schifani, 575-646-6233, schifani@nmsu.edu

In a landmark court decision, a judge ruled that New Mexico is violating students’ constitutional rights to a sufficient education. New Mexico State University will provide the opportunity for the community to join the discussion on Yazzie/Martinez v. State of New Mexico from 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 21 in O’Donnell Hall, Room 111, 1220 Stewart St.

Woman speaking at a podium.
Wilhelmina Yazzie of Gallup, New Mexico, filed a lawsuit against the State of New Mexico because she believed her son was not provided with the tools necessary to succeed through public education. In the case of Yazzie/Martinez v. State of New Mexico, the judge’s ruling was in favor of the plaintiff stating that the public-school system is failing due to insufficient funding. New Mexico State University is providing the chance for the public to discuss the implications of this ruling from 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 21. (Courtesy Photo)

New Mexico ranks 50th in the nation for K-12 public education. This lawsuit has statewide implications as it brings attention to how schools lack the programming, resources and funding needed to enable children to succeed. Changes are necessary to ensure that students graduate ready to continue with post-secondary education or move forward into a viable career.

“This is the first large convening in southern New Mexico around the ruling in Yazzie/Martinez v. State of New Mexico,” said Dulcinea Lara, criminal justice associate professor. “This will be informational, sharing a timeline of events and implications resulting from the ruling for all students in New Mexico.”

A panel of stakeholders and education experts will speak about how this impacts youth in the region. Attendees are welcome to come with questions about how this will affect local communities and how change can be supported.

“It is reasonable to usher in a culturally-responsive, equity-based and trauma-informed education when multiple studies prove this approach increases attendance, GPA and graduation rates across the board,” said Lara. “New Mexico’s future will be increasingly bright if we can collaborate across the state to fulfill the legal mandate put forth by this lawsuit.”

Appetizers and beverages will be provided in the O’Donnell Hall lobby from 5 to 6 p.m., inviting participants to meet and network prior to the panel.

For more information about the event, contact Lara at dulcinea@nmsu.edu.



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[l] at 11/15/19 4:00pm
NMSU’s Arrowhead Center celebrates launch of American Indian Business Enterprise Center

Date: 11/15/2019
Writer: Adriana M. Chavez, 575-646-1957, adchavez@nmsu.edu

American Indian entrepreneurs now have a number of resources available to help launch their business ideas thanks to a new center at New Mexico State University’s Arrowhead Center, made possible by a grant from U.S. Minority Business Development Agency.

Group of people cutting a large ribbon
Arrowhead Center at New Mexico State University hosted a ribbon cutting ceremony Nov. 14 for the American Indian Business Enterprise Center, which will expand Studio G, a business accelerator for students and recent alumni, to the American Indian Community. From left is Lauren Goldstein, Arrowhead Center director and Chief Executive Officer Kathy Hansen, NMSU Chancellor Dan Arvizu and NMSU Indian Resources Development director Claudia Trueblood. (NMSU photo by Justin Santiago) Head and shoulders of a man
Navajo Technical University director Ben Jones joined New Mexico State University Chancellor Dan Arvizu and Arrowhead Center staff for the official ribbon cutting of the American Indian Business Enterprise Center Nov. 14 at Arrowhead Center in Las Cruces. (NMSU photo by Justin Santiago)

The $260,000 grant is the first awarded to NMSU and Arrowhead Center by the MBDA, and has helped to create the American Indian Business Enterprise Center, which will expand Studio G, a business accelerator for students and recent alumni, to American Indian student entrepreneurs across New Mexico.

Arrowhead Center hosted a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the center Nov. 14.

The AIBE Center allows participants to utilize Arrowhead Center’s resources including an advisory network of business experts, and offers training via online and in-person classes. The center also gives American Indian entrepreneurs workspaces for their start-up businesses, allowing them to find a foothold in their industry.

“As part of our strategic plan, NMSU is working to further amplify our extension and outreach efforts, especially in terms of economic development and entrepreneurship,” said NMSU Chancellor Dan Arvizu. “Programs like this, and the results we are expecting, are tremendously important for our native populations and others across the state.”

Brooke Montgomery is the Studio G and AIBE deputy site director. Arrowhead Center already has a network of 14 sites throughout the state and in tribal nations to work with AIBE. Locally, both the NMSU Indian Resources Development program and NMSU’s American Indian Program are already working with AIBE.

“The efforts of Ms. Brooke Montgomery and NMSU will enable NTU to establish the presence of Studio G to grow our own entrepreneurs,” said Ben Jones, director of Navajo Technical University.

Jones and Arvizu attended the ribbon cutting, which featured video statements from two U.S. senators from New Mexico.

“This is an incredible opportunity for New Mexico State University to expand its work across the state promoting economic growth for young Native Americans by partnering with universities and cultural centers across New Mexico,” said U.S. Sen. Tom Udall in a video message. “The business enterprise project will help make sure native communities can thrive for generations to come.”

In a separate video message, U.S. Sen. Martin Heinrich said, “I’m always impressed with the way that the Arrowhead Center provides entrepreneurs – students and adults alike – with access to training, capital and resources they need to succeed. I’m thrilled to see Arrowhead Center put this proven model to work for entrepreneurs in our state’s tribal communities.”

For more information about the AIBE, contact Montgomery at mbrooke@nmsu.edu or 575-646-1859.

Broadcast Advisory Watch this video on YouTube at https://youtu.be/wRod9imeF2M and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ydtNzblIddg.

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[l] at 11/15/19 4:00pm
NMSU to host WSARE sustainable agriculture conference in Los Lunas, Dec. 10

Date: 11/15/2019
Writer: Jane Moorman, 505-249-0527, jmoorman@nmsu.edu

LOS LUNAS – Managing pest and disease challenges is crucial for a sustainable agricultural operation to prosper.

Man with mustache in cowboy hat
Larry Cundall of Cundall Ranch in Wyoming will be the keynote speaker at the New Mexico Sustainable Agriculture Conference. The conference will be from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 10, at the University of New Mexico-Valencia Campus, 280 La Entrada Road, Los Lunas. New Mexico State University's College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences is hosting the event that is sponsored by the Western Sustainable Agriculture Research and Educaiton program. (Photo courtesy of HIgh Plains Journal)

Methods to deal with these risks, as well as information on technologies to improve agriculture infrastructure will be the focus of the 2019 New Mexico Sustainable Agriculture Conference.

The free single-day conference, sponsored by the Western Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program, will be presented from 8 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 10, at the University of New Mexico-Valencia Campus, 280 La Entrada Road, Los Lunas. A free lunch will be provided.

New Mexico State University’s College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences is hosting the event.

“WSARE aims to promote new and time-tested methods of agriculture that preserve our land and water while improving the lives of farmers and the community,” said Stephanie Walker, WSARE New Mexico program co-coordinator and NMSU Extension vegetable specialist. “We have an agenda of speakers on topics that are vital to agricultural producers.”

Keynote address of the conference will be “Factors in Making (my) Ranch Decisions” by Larry Cundall of Cundall Ranch in Wyoming. Cundall is a past chair of the WSARE Administrative Council and a recipient of the Wyoming Stock Growers Environmental Stewardship Award.

Presentation topics will be:
- “Putting the Sun to Work: Soil Solarization for Management of Weeds and Soil-borne Pathogens,” by Jennifer Parker of Oregon State University
- “Challenges and Benefits of Winter Cover Crops in Southern New Mexico,” by Eric Lehnhoff, NMSU assistant professor in weed science.
- “Chemical Free Weed Management with Electricity,” by Paul Neher, research and development engineer at the Physical Science Laboratory housed at NMSU.
- “An Update on Weed Management Tools,” by Bill McCloskey, University of Arizona
- “Achieving Precision Irrigation with Reduced Costs,” by Blair Stringam, NMSU plant and environmental sciences professor.
- “Defining and Incorporating Integrated Pest Management,” by Amanda Skidmore, NMSU Extension IPM specialist.
- “Bio-rational Management of Soil-borne Diseases in Annual and Perennial Crops,” by Soum Sanogo, NMSU plant pathology professor.

Online registration is available at http://rsvp.nmsu.edu/rsvp/sustainable2019.



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[l] at 11/15/19 4:00pm
NMSU senior receives national outstanding mentor award

Date: 11/15/2019
Writer: Tiffany Acosta, 575-646-3929, tfrank@nmsu.edu

Alicia Romero, a senior at New Mexico State University, was recognized as the 2019 College Reading & Learning Association’s Outstanding Mentor at the organization’s annual conference in New Orleans, Louisiana, Oct. 30-Nov. 2. She was honored for her work as a TRIO Student Support Services peer mentor at NMSU.

Two women standing.
Alicia Romero (right), a senior at New Mexico State University, accepted the 2019 College Reading & Learning Association’s Outstanding Mentor award from Ashley Lewis, a CRLA representative, at the organization’s annual conference in New Orleans, Louisiana. She was honored for her work as a TRIO Student Support Services peer mentor at NMSU. (Courtesy photo)

A Roswell, New Mexico, native, Romero is set to graduate in May 2020 with a bachelor’s degree in biology, wildlife management and conservation ecology. She is in her fourth year as a TRIO mentor and has received a CRLA Level 3 Master Mentor Certification, which is the top certification possible.

Romero said she was surprised when she received the announcement.

“I was in shock at the beginning because I didn’t fully know what it meant, but I feel so honored to be able to represent the TRIO Student Support Service team in this way,” Romero said.

“The biggest reward of mentoring that I have experienced is when the students share with you their accomplishments,” she said. “It’s the text messages that say, ‘I’ve made it into the program!’ or ‘I’ve passed the test!’ I enjoy celebrating in their accomplishments with them.”

Bernadine Booky, TRIO Student Support Services mentor coordinator, said she is very proud to have the top mentor in the nation working with NMSU students.

“She (Romero) has changed so many students’ lives both academically and personally. Alicia is very dedicated to her job and students. She goes above and beyond to help her students accomplish goals and achievements they are unaware they are capable of. She spreads positivity and motivation to anyone who comes in contact with her on a daily basis,” Booky said.

Romero has spent more than 400 hours mentoring students and more than 100 hours attending trainings.

“Mentoring is about empathy and using the skills that you are taught through trainings to help students in their endeavors,” Romero said. “Applying what we learn through training helps us work with our students to help them succeed. As this is learned you also start to unconsciously mentor those around you. It isn’t necessarily about telling them what to do. It is about being a confidante and offering advice or resources when asked. It is about being a part of the support system for the student that helps them succeed.”

In addition to accepting the award, Romero participated in a student panel at the conference, “Peer Educators: Who They Are, What They Do, and How They Benefit Colleges and Universities.” As one of six peer educators, Romero spoke about how she is successful in her job, challenges overcome and helpful trainings for her position.

“Alicia did an outstanding job representing TRIO SSS and NMSU as she mentioned the strong community and collaboration TRIO and NMSU has with each other,” Booky said.



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Four NMSU students selected as Fulbright winners

Date: 11/15/2019
Writer: Adriana M. Chavez, 575-646-1957, adchavez@nmsu.edu

Four students from New Mexico State University were named 2019 Fulbright winners, the most NMSU has produced in a year so far. The students received the prestigious recognition following a record year for Fulbright applicants from NMSU.

Photo of four people
Four students from New Mexico State University were recently named Fulbright winners, the most NMSU has produced in a year so far. The students received the prestigious recognition following a record year for Fulbright applicants from NMSU. (Courtesy photo)

“The Honors College had a record number of 10 Fulbright applicants this year. Six of these students were selected as semi-finalists and four students won the Fulbright fellowship,” said Tim Ketelaar, associate dean of the Honors College and director of the Office of National Scholarships and International Education. “Their success is a testament to NMSU’s amazing honors students.”

The students who received Fulbright fellowships are:

– Nubia Rivas, a pre-med student and biology major who will be teaching English in the Canary Islands and working as a volunteer with refugee and immigrant populations;

– Sierra Grim, a genetics and biotechnology major who is studying personalized medicine and pharmacology at the Institute of Pharmacology in Greifswald, Germany;

– Ger Xiong, an art major and native of Thailand who has returned there to study Hmong textile art;

– Ashley Page, a water sciences major who is spending time in Bulgaria and Greece to study transboundary water issues to compare them to the Hueco Bolson between Mexico and New Mexico.

According to the Fulbright website, the Fulbright U.S. Student Program provides grants for individually designed study/research projects or for English Teaching Assistant Programs. During their grants, Fulbrighters meet, work, live with and learn from the people of a host country. The program facilitates cultural exchange through direct interaction on an individual basis in the classroom, field, home and in routine tasks.

The Honors College is not only celebrating a 40 percent Fulbright success rate that exceeds the national average of 20 percent, but the accomplishments of this year’s Fulbright winners, who are each conducting a wide range of research projects worldwide.

“I am far away from the comforting green chile scents of the Land of Enchantment,” said Grim, who married her husband in April and is temporarily living in Germany with him while conducting her Fulbright research. “I definitely miss the smell and taste of green chile but I am beyond honored and excited to represent the United States as a Fulbright research scholar this next year.”

Grim will be working under the mentorship of University of Greifswald professor Mladen Tzvetkov, who is investigating rare genetic variants that interact with Metformin, a drug commonly used to treat type 2 diabetes patients.

The Honors College will host its annual Fulbright Workshop at 4 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 20, at the Conroy Honors Center. Students also will have the opportunity to meet Fay Yurwit, last year’s student winner of the $5,000 NMSU Honors College International Research Scholarship. The workshop is intended for students who want to learn more about funded opportunities to support their own independent international research projects.

NMSU faculty members who assisted in advising students as part of the university’s Fulbright committee are Rachel Stevens, emeritus professor of art; Andrea Orzoff, Honors faculty fellow and history professor; Mary Alice Scott, a medical anthropologist and Anthropology department professor; and Honors College Dean Miriam Chaiken.



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[l] at 11/14/19 4:00pm
NMSU Kitchen Creations program featured in American Diabetes Association directory

Date: 11/14/2019
Writer: Adriana M. Chavez, 575-646-1957, adchavez@nmsu.edu

Kitchen Creations, a cooking program sponsored by the New Mexico Department of Health’s Diabetes Prevention and Control Program and offered by New Mexico State University’s Cooperative Extension Service, has been featured in the American Diabetes Associations’s Diabetes Support Directory, a free online tool that connects people to much-needed diabetes support programs.

Las Cruces Kitchen Creations participants in 2016 enjoy the healthy meal they prepared. Kitchen Creations, a cooking program offered by New Mexico State Univers
Las Cruces Kitchen Creations participants in 2016 enjoy the healthy meal they prepared. Kitchen Creations, a cooking program offered by New Mexico State University’s Cooperative Extension Service, has been featured by the American Diabetes Association’s Diabetes Support Directory, a free online tool that connects people to much-needed diabetes support programs. (NMSU photo by Andres Leighton)

The programs featured in the directory are each qualified, ADA-approved diabetes support programs.

There are 30 million Americans living with diabetes, and an additional 84 million with prediabetes. Diabetes support programs provide ongoing support to people with diabetes to maintain and expand upon the skill, knowledge and lifestyle changes gained from recognized diabetes self-management education and support services. The ADA’s Diabetes Support Initiative assures that diabetes support program curriculums meet the ADA’s criteria for support programming, aligns with the Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes and demonstrates significant positive health outcomes.

“Today, more than 30 million Americans, including over 240,000 here in New Mexico, are living with diabetes,” said Lourdes Olivas, Extension Associate II with NMSU’s Extension Family and Consumer Sciences department. “NMSU Cooperative Extension Services is committed to providing high-quality support programming and resources to help all those living with diabetes not just live but thrive.”

Cassandra Vanderpool, also an NMSU Extension Associate II in the department, added, “We are thrilled to announce recognition of Kitchen Creations by the ADA, and look forward to continuing to help people with diabetes enjoy healthy eating within their communities.”

Every day more than 4,000 people are newly diagnosed with diabetes in America. Nearly 115 million Americans have diabetes or prediabetes and are striving to manage their lives while living with the disease. The American Diabetes Association is the nation’s leading voluntary health organization fighting to bend the curve on the diabetes epidemic and help people living with diabetes thrive.

To learn more about Kitchen Creations, visit https://kitchencreations.nmsu.edu/. To access the ADA’s Diabetes Support Directory, visit professional.diabetes.org/DSDirectory.



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[l] at 11/13/19 4:00pm
NMSU’s next climate change lecture to highlight the impact of art

Date: 11/13/2019
Writer: Amanda Adame, 575-646-7953, aadame4@nmsu.edu

New Mexico State University’s Climate Change Education Seminar Series (NMSUCCESS) continues with a closer look at how art can be used to engage the public about environmental threats in the Rio Grande region. The next lecture is part of the “Species in Peril Along the Rio Grande” schedule of events in November including workshops, presentations and exhibits related to climate change.

Man outside smiling
NMSU alumnus Subhankar Banerjee, the Lannan chair and professor at the University of New Mexico’s art and ecology program, will give a talk titled, “Multispecies Justice in the Age of Biological Annihilation and Climate Breakdown,” at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 20 at the Rio Grande Theatre, 211 Main Street. (Courtesy Photo)

NMSU alumnus Subhankar Banerjee, the Lannan chair and professor at the University of New Mexico’s art and ecology program, will give a talk titled, “Multispecies Justice in the Age of Biological Annihilation and Climate Breakdown,” at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 20 at the Rio Grande Theatre, 211 Main Street.

Banerjee is co-curator of “Species in Peril Along the Rio Grande” – an artistic response to what a recent United Nations report called an “unprecedented” threat to biological diversity worldwide caused in part by climate change.

“With arts and stories informed by science and indigenous ecological knowledge, ‘Species in Peril Along the Rio Grande’ offers a regional model of building bridges (not walls) across nations, peoples, disciplines and creative practices, to address a global crisis – the crisis of biological annihilation, which includes human-caused extinctions, die-offs and massacres of non-human kind with whom we share this Earth,” Banerjee said.

Banerjee’s photographs have been highlighted in more than fifty exhibitions around the world and the Harwood Museum of Art will show his work in December 2019. He received a Greenleaf Artist Award from the United Nations Environment Programme and a Cultural Freedom Award from Lannan Foundation.

“Artists like Subhankar and exhibitions like ‘Species in Peril Along the Rio Grande’ fuel interdisciplinary collaborations that create collective resources to cultivate awareness, initiate new questions and potential solutions, build new models of understanding, and inspire sustained action and change,” said Marisa Sage, director of the NMSU Museum of Art, which is among 14 institutions to host events this month about climate change.

This is the final talk this semester of the continuing NMSUCCESS series of lectures by experts in different fields, which began last year. The series will continue in spring 2020. Future topics will include mass extinction threats, carbon sequestration, national and global security concerns and agricultural responses. The series’ goal is to shine a light on research and issues related to climate change for this region.

Learn more about other events in Las Cruces during “Species in Peril Along the Rio Grande” month at https://uag.nmsu.edu/species-in-peril-along-the-rio-grande/.



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[l] at 11/12/19 4:00pm
Three Fulbright Scholars to speak at NMSU this week

Date: 11/12/2019
Writer: Adriana M. Chavez, 575-646-1957, adchavez@nmsu.edu

As part of Research Week and Creativity events at New Mexico State University, the William Conroy Honors College will host a series of lectures by three visiting Fulbright Scholars who will discuss authoritarian governments around the world.

All lectures are free and open to the public, and will take place in the Honors College Commons Room, 2745 S. Espina St.

Lynda Dematteo, a visiting scholar from France conducting research at Montana State University, will speak at 3:30 p.m. today. Her lecture, “Cross-cultural Anthropology of Authoritarian Populism,” is the basis of her research.

At 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 13, Mexican scholar José Antonio Aguilar Rivera will discuss, “Mexico’s Authoritarian Turn.” Aguilar Rivera is being hosted by the University of Chicago.

And at 3:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 14, Mexican scholar Lorena Ojeda Davila will speak about, “The Tarascan Project in Mexico: Academic Collaboration and International Cooperation between Mexico and the USA 1938-48.”

Following Ojeda Davila’s lecture, the Honors College will host a continued discussion and panel at 4:30 p.m. with all three scholars, including a question and answer session with participants.

For more information, contact the Honors College at 575-646-2005.



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[l] at 11/12/19 4:00pm
NMSU’s fundamental physics program receives country’s first ABET accreditation

Date: 11/12/2019
Writer: Amanda Adame, 575-646-7953, aadame4@nmsu.edu

The Department of Physics at New Mexico State University has received accreditation from the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) for its Bachelor of Science in physics, becoming the first ABET accredited fundamental-physics program in the nation.

Physics students working
Esther Thompson and Sean Tierney are current students in the Department of Physics that is home to the first ABET accredited fundamental physics program in the country. (NMSU photo by Josh Bachman) Girls and boys working in lab
Esther Thompson and Dominick Gonzales, speak with Sean Tierney in a lab in the Physics building. (NMSU photo by Josh Bachman)

ABET is a nonprofit, ISO 9001 certified organization that accredits college and university programs in applied and natural science, computing, engineering and engineering technology. ISO 9001 is the international standard that specifies requirements for a quality management system. Organizations use the standard to demonstrate the ability to consistently provide products and services that meet customer and regulatory requirements.

“The biggest benefit is we now have a system to judge the educational value of our program,” said Stephen Pate, one of two NMSU physics professors who led the accreditation process. “The accrediting agency requires you to establish standards for your program, and then determine if you are meeting your standards.”

The criteria for ABET accreditation are based on student performance, student outcomes, continuous improvement, curriculum, faculty, facilities, institutional support and most importantly, program educational objectives (PEOs).

“With the help of our External Advisory Board, we identified three PEOs for our Bachelor of Science in physics program: competitiveness, adaptability and collaboration and leadership,” said Heinz Nakotte, a physics professor who led the NMSU’s physics accreditation process with Pate.

“These PEOs are not necessarily limited to careers in physics. More specifically: competitiveness - our graduates are competitive in internationally recognized academic, government and industrial environments; adaptability - our graduates exhibit success in solving complex technical problems in a broad range of disciplines; collaboration and leadership - our graduates have a proven ability to function as part of and/or lead interdisciplinary teams.”

As the first ABET accredited fundamental-physics program in the U.S., NMSU physics graduates in the College of Arts and Sciences are likely to have a competitive advantage for jobs compared to those who graduate with a B.S. in physics from other universities.

“Many companies prefer to hire graduates with a B.S. in physics for their engineering jobs since those graduates show much larger versatility compared to straight engineering majors,” said Nakotte. “However, many companies require a degree from an ABET-accredited program for their advertised engineering jobs, and graduates with a B.S. in physics from a non-ABET-accredited program cannot apply. Therefore, ABET accreditation increases the number of potential career opportunities for our graduates.”

NMSU graduates who earned a bachelor’s in physics as far back as fall 2017 are considered to have graduated from an ABET accredited program.

The fundamental physics program is NMSU's second ABET accredited physics program. NMSU’s engineering physics program, also ABET accredited, is offered jointly by the College of Engineering and NMSU's Department of Physics.

ABET currently accredits 4,144 programs at more than 812 colleges and universities in 32 countries. For more information about ABET and the accreditation criteria used to evaluate programs please visit www.abet.org.



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[l] at 11/12/19 4:00pm
Potential quorum notice of NMSU regents for Nov. 16

Date: 11/12/2019
Writer: Adriana M. Chavez, 575-646-1957, adchavez@nmsu.edu

A potential quorum of the New Mexico State University Board of Regents may occur as regents may attend the NMSU vs. University of the Incarnate Word football game at 2 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 16, at Aggie Memorial Stadium, 1815 Wells St., on the Las Cruces campus.

No votes or other official actions will be taken by the NMSU Board of Regents.

Please contact the Office of the Board of Regents at 575-646-5997 for additional information.



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NMSU’s Arrowhead Center awarded grant to establish American Indian Business Enterprise program

Date: 11/11/2019
Writer: Cassie McClure, 575-312-3242, cassie@mcclurepublications.com

Native American communities will have a new home to explore their business ideas at New Mexico State University.

Group photo
Future New Mexico State University Aggies from the Santo Domingo Pueblo pose with representatives from the NMSU Indian Resources Development program and NMSU’s American Indian Program. (NMSU courtesy photo)

Arrowhead Center, NMSU’s entrepreneurship and innovation center, has been awarded a grant by the U.S. Minority Business Development Agency to establish the American Indian Business Enterprise program.

The $260,000 grant will expand Studio G, a business accelerator for students and recent alumni, to the American Indian Community. AIBE harnesses Arrowhead Center’s network of business experts, offers training via online and in-person classes and has workspaces for start-up businesses to find a foothold in their industry.

“These grants affirm MBDA’s long-standing commitment to economic development in Indian Country,” said Henry Childs II, MBDA national director. “There are many examples of economic success in Indian Country. This includes areas such as energy, tourism, and gaming. Indigenous communities are a vital part of regional economies but are often disconnected from efforts to promote regional and rural development.”

Childs added, “This disconnect contributes to disparities in socio-economic outcomes experienced in Indian Country. MBDA’s investments will help link Indigenous communities with regional and rural development efforts.”

Locally, both the NMSU Indian Resources Development program and NMSU’s American Indian Program are eager to take part in the development at Arrowhead Center.

“The American Indian Program is excited to work with AIBE,” said Michael Ray, AIP director. “As our Aggies share their plans for shaping the future, we know they will have great guidance and a strong support system.”

Claudia Trueblood, IRD director, said that the mission of IRD is to connect New Mexico indigenous youth with educational and on-the-job opportunities in business, agriculture, natural resources and engineering.

“Arrowhead Center’s AIBE program, in partnership with IRD, will afford more opportunities for Native American students to start and grow their own businesses which in turn will inspire other students and contribute to the economic development of tribal communities,” she said.

Brooke Montgomery, Studio G and AIBE deputy site director, said that Arrowhead Center already has a network of 14 sites throughout the state and in Tribal Countries to work with the program.

AIBE also has a student ambassador, Keanu Jones of Navajo Tech University, who is excited to get started.

“As a student at Navajo Technical University, I'm looking forward to the future developments of this great opportunity,” Jones said. “Economic development is a huge issue across Indian Country and by taking small steps to develop avenues for entrepreneurs to grow and sustain could be an answer.”

Join in the celebration with Provost Carol Parker, Navajo Technical University director Ben Jones and Arrowhead Center staff for the official ribbon cutting of the AIBE at 9:30 a.m. Thursday, Nov. 14, at Arrowhead Center, 655 Research Dr. in Las Cruces. Register for free at https://bit.ly/2BJgmX3

For more information about the AIBE, contact Brooke Montgomery at mbrooke@nmsu.edu or 575-646-1859.



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NMSU to host Research and Creativity Week Nov. 11-15

Date: 11/11/2019
Writer: Tiffany Acosta, 575-646-3929, tfrank@nmsu.edu

To encourage collaboration across campus and celebrate the scholarly research and creative activity of faculty, staff and students, New Mexico State University will host Research and Creativity Week Nov. 11-15. Events are open to the public.

Women dancing
During New Mexico State University’s Research and Creativity Week Nov. 11-15, more than 60 events will be held on campus including a dance performance by the kinesiology and dance program at 11 a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 12. The events are open to the public. (NMSU photo by Andres Leighton)

More than 60 events will be held on campus, and will include keynote addresses, highlighted faculty talks, posters presentations, media installations, performances and musical events, presentations of film, theater and the arts along with professional development opportunities.

“The goal of Research and Creativity Week is to present the many facets of research and creative activities at NMSU,” said Stephen Pate, physics professor and chair of the University Research Council.

Pate said Research and Creativity Week gives students an opportunity to learn how to prepare and present at professional conferences.

“For the students, it’s part of their education. We encourage students to do these things. Faculty should do them too, as a way of showing students how presentations are done,” he said.

Vice President of Research Luis Cifuentes said it is important to celebrate and support students who are presenting and performing. Also, he is hopeful Research and Creativity Week will lead to many interdisciplinary research collaborations.

“One of the goals is to have people connect, find out what others are doing and get great ideas on how they can work together,” Cifuentes said.

Three keynote speeches will be given by NMSU alumni. Nancy Reichert will give a keynote address at 12 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 13 at Corbett Center Student Union ballroom. Reichert was the first graduate from the molecular biology program in 1989 when she earned her Ph.D. Her talk will highlight the development and advances in plant science in the last three decades. Reichert is a professor at Mississippi State University’s Department of Biological Sciences.

Jennifer Ryder Fox will give a keynote address, “Jersey girl learns about agriculture and green chile,” at 9 a.m. Thursday, Nov. 14 at Corbett Center ballroom. After earning a Ph.D. in woody plant physiology at NMSU and working for Western Crop Protection Association, FMC Corporation and AgraQuest Inc., Fox returned to higher education in 2002 at California Polytechnic State University. She was a professor and first department head for the newly-formed Horticulture and Crop Science Department. From 2006-2014, she was dean of the College of Agriculture for California State University, Chico. Now living in Las Cruces, Fox has worked as an agricultural industry expert for NMSU’s Arrowhead Center.

NMSU Chancellor Dan Arvizu will give a keynote address, “The role of technology for energy transformation,” at 9 a.m. Friday, Nov. 15 at Corbett Center ballroom.

A National Endowment for the Humanities workshop will be at 10 a.m. Nov. 13 in College of Health and Social Services, Room 218. Daniel Sack from NEH will lead the training for faculty.

The NMSU Water Initiative Fall 2019 event will be from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. in Corbett Center, Dona Ana Room 312. Attendees can learn about NMSU graduate student’s water-related research and seek collaborations for NMSU faculty and graduate students on water-related research and grant proposals.

In addition to 19 scheduled open house events, six career development discussions for faculty and students are slated for the week. An awards presentation will be at 5:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 15 at Pete’s Patio in Corbett Center.

To view a complete list of events for Research and Creativity Week visit https://rcw.nmsu.edu/events/.



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[l] at 11/11/19 4:00pm
NMSU to hold 10th annual forage growers workshop in Los Lunas Dec. 3

Date: 11/11/2019
Writer: Jane Moorman, 505-249-0527, jmoorman@nmsu.edu

LOS LUNAS – The majority of New Mexico agricultural commodities are fueled by forage.

Person standing by sign
Leslie Beck, New Mexico State University’s Extension weed specialist, will talk about the research findings on plantain weed management in alfalfa during the Forage Growers Workshop in Los Lunas on Dec. 3. (NMSU photo by Jane Moorman)

In 2018, New Mexico harvested 932,000 tons of forage products valuing $211,080,000.

Of the state’s $3.38 billion cash receipts for commodities in 2017, $2.22 billion came from livestock and milk production according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture Statistic Service. The primary feed source for those commodities is forage.

Providing research-based information through workshops and publications, New Mexico State University College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences helps farmers to produce high quality forage efficiently.

NMSU’s Cooperative Extension Service in Valencia County is hosting the 10th annual Forage Growers Workshop on Tuesday, Dec. 3, to share the latest forage information.

The workshop will be from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the University of New Mexico-Valencia Campus, 280 La Entrada Road, Los Lunas.

Registration is $20, which includes program materials and lunch. Register online at https://rsvp.nmsu.edu/rsvp/forage2019.

“I always look forward to meeting up with fellow farmers and visiting about the years’ successes and challenges,” said Eugene Abeita, a long-time grower in Isleta Pueblo. “I get my pesticide applicator CEU’s and talk one-on-one with the specialists and presenters. I learn something new every time I attend.”

Five CEUs are available for participants who have their New Mexico Department of Agriculture pesticide applicator’s license.

“There are many challenges to growing a high quality forage crop,” said Newt McCarty, Valencia County Agriculture Extension Agent. “Weather, water, insects and weeds are some of those. By providing the annual forage growers workshop, we hope to provide information, tools and guidance to address challenges and increase the income potential for producers.”

Workshop topics start with the benefits of leaf surfactants, a surface active agents, and adjuvants, any substance added to the spray tank that adds to the performance of the pesticide.

“Adding adjuvants and surfactants to your herbicide tank mix can improve the effectiveness of your herbicide applications, in addition to saving time and money throughout the growing season,” said Jim Wanstall, NMDA natural resource specialist. “This hands-on presentation will provide evidence of how this occurs.”

Robert Flynn, NMSU Extension agronomist will speak on soil sampling, and demonstrate how to collect a soil to submit for testing.

An irrigation water outlook will be provided by Mike Hamman, Middle Rio Grande Conservation District chief executive officer and chief engineer. He will discuss opportunities for more efficient and consistent water delivery in the future.

Leonard Lauriault, NMSU Extension forage agronomist at NMSUs Agricultural Science Center at Tucumcari, will present rotational crop options between permanent crop rotations.

“When alfalfa hay fields or pastures become depleted, producers need alternative forages during the rotation period before replanting alfalfa,” Lauriault said. “Selecting the best alternative forage is critical to sustaining income and assuring successful re-establishment of the alfalfa.”

Research findings on plantain management in alfalfa will be presented by Leslie Beck, NMSU Extension weed specialist. She will also discuss managing common weeds in forages.

“We’re excited to have Cecilia Rosacker, Rio Grande Agricultural Land Trust executive director, speaking on land trusts, how they work, and their benefits,” McCarty said.

Mark Marsalis, NMSU Extension forage specialist at NMSU’s Agricultural Science Center at Los Lunas, will present information on fescue and orchardgrass variety selection, establishment, and weed and fertility management.

USDA agency representatives will also present updates on programs available through the Natural Resource Conservation Service, Farm Services Agency, and Valencia County Soil and Water Conservation District.

The Decade of Support Award will be presented to Albert Benavidez with New Mexico Tractor Sales for their tremendous support of the forage workshop since its beginning in 2009.



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[l] at 11/11/19 4:00pm
NMSU Extension family, consumer science programs receive national awards

Date: 11/11/2019
Writer: Jane Moorman, 505-249-0527, jmoorman@nmsu.edu

Three New Mexico State University Extension family and consumer science programs received national recognition during the National Extension Association for Family and Consumer Sciences annual conference held in Hershey, Penn., in October.

Four women
New Mexico State University's family and consumer science agents in Bernalillo, Sandoval and Torrance counties were honored at the National Extension Association for Family and Consumer Sciences annual conference for their monthly educational nutrition and health segments on KRQE-TV New Mexico Living show. Receiving the first place award from, second from left, Karen Munden, NEAFCS 2018-19 president; were, from left Cindy Davies, Dianne Christensen and Cydney Martin. (Courtesy photo) Two women
New Mexico State University's Laura Bittner, Extension family and consumer science agent in Valencia County, was recognized at the National Extension Association for Family and Consumer Sciences annual conference for two innovative programs she has established in her community. NEAFCS 2018-2019 president Karen Muden, left, presented the awards. (Courtesy photo)

“I am proud to be part of a department of such dedicated professionals,” said Robert Moreno, NMSU professor and Extension Family and Consumer Sciences department head. “They are consistently recognized regionally and nationally for their excellence in programing and community engagement.”

“The commitment of these award recipients to meet the needs of individuals, families and community is exemplary,” said Karen Munden, NEAFCS 2018-2019 president.

A team of six agents received first place in the television/video communication category. This award recognizes excellence in an educational or promotional feature in a regular broadcast or special program.

Dianne Christensen, Cindy Davies, Nicole Jacobs, Cydney Martin, Lydia Montoya and Danielle, from Bernalillo, Sandoval, Santa Fe and Torrance counties, were honored for their monthly food and nutrition segment on KRQE-TV “New Mexico Living” program. The ongoing five-minute segment is aired live the fourth Monday of each month.

Laura Bittner received second place awards for two programs she conducts in Valencia County.

The Nutrition on Weekends Snack Program received the community partnership award, which recognizes NEAFCS members for outstanding community partnership efforts in meeting the needs of families through collaboration with group, agencies and consumers.

This program provides a snack pack to the 150-plus students at Los Lunas Schools’ Century High School each Thursday afternoon to help offset food insecurity in their homes. The project is a collaboration of community groups, local churches, and individuals.

Food Camp for Kids received the innovative youth development programming award, which recognizes a program that reaches a new audience or expands a current audience, a subject matter area, a new delivery methods or another creative approach.

Each summer youth, ages 9-14, learn where their food comes from in a six-day camp that combines field trips to agricultural operations in the county with cooking, nutrition, and food safety education.

Using computer tablets, the youth create a PowerPoint presentation about the week that they present to an audience of 40-50 family members and industry professionals the last day. Bittner and Newt McCarty, Valencia County Extension agricultural agent, conduct the camp.

The programs received first place honors at the state and Western Region prior to being submitted for the national award.



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[l] at 11/8/19 4:00pm
NMSU Board of Regents, Grants Advisory Board to hold joint meeting Nov. 12

Date: 11/08/2019
Writer: Carlos Andres Lopez, 575-646-1955, carlopez@nmsu.edu

The Board of Regents of New Mexico State University will hold a joint meeting with the NMSU Grants Advisory Board at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 12, at the Earl Chavez Board Room, Grants/Cibola Schools Central Office, 413 W. Roosevelt Ave., Grants, New Mexico.

No votes or official actions will be taken by the Board of Regents at this meeting.

In compliance with the Open Meetings Act, copies of the agenda will be made available at NMSU’s Zuhl Library on the Las Cruces campus at least 72 hours prior to the meeting and accessible on the public university website at https://regents.nmsu.edu/agenda/ .

Please contact the Office of the Board of Regents at 575-646-5997 if you need additional information.



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[l] at 11/8/19 4:00pm
NMSU to host Iraqi scientists for two-month water training

Date: 11/08/2019
Writer: Carlos Andres Lopez, 575-646-1955, carlopez@nmsu.edu

The College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences at New Mexico State University will welcome two scientists from Iraq’s Ministry of Water Resources and Ministry of Agriculture for a two-month training on water economics and policy modelling, beginning in December.

Man kneels down
Frank Ward, a Distinguished Achievement professor at New Mexico State University, will help train two scientists from Iraq on water economics and policy modelling from December to February. (Courtesy) Headshot of a woman
Dina Salman, a research assistant professor at New Mexico State University, will help train two scientists from Iraq on water economics and policy modelling from December to February. (Courtesy)

United States Geological Survey scientist Saud Amer, an affiliated faculty member in the Department of Agricultural Economics and Agricultural Business at NMSU, will administer the program in Las Cruces with funding from the U.S. State Department. NMSU faculty members Frank Ward, a Distinguished Achievement professor, and Dina Salman, a research assistant professor, will assist in presenting the program, which will conclude in February.

“The two-month session for the two scientists represents the first in what will be two years of programs that will move the ministry’s water resource managers from consumers of economically analyzed data to producers,” Ward said.

The visiting scientists are Hatem Sallom and Ahmed Abdulhamza, who will receive a certificate of appreciation from NMSU after completing the program.

According to Ward, Iraq’s Ministry of Water Resources and Ministry of Agriculture currently rely on data produced through an early warning program by the USGS Earth Resources and Observation Science Center.

“Much of the work at these sessions will show the Iraqi scientists how to develop, apply and interpret economic analysis of climate water-stress mitigation measures,” Ward said. “Surface water is an important source of water in the northern part of Iraq, while groundwater plays a bigger part of water use in the southern part of the country.”

The upcoming training session is an extension of similar programs currently offered by the College of ACES, on topics that include water-resource economics, microeconomic theory and mathematical programming. Future sessions will cover dynamic web development and reservoir-volume estimation, as well as updating Iraq’s national water strategy.

“This is an example of the worldwide activities that the College of ACES conducts resulting from the research conducted in water management in arid and semiarid lands,” College of ACES Dean Rolando Flores said.

For more information on the training session, contact Ward at fward@nmsu.edu, Amer at samer@usgs.gov or Salman at dinasalm@nmsu.edu. To hear Amer discuss the project on a podcast, visit https://www.usgs.gov/centers/eros/science/eyes-earth-episode-5-declassified-data-eros?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects



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[l] at 11/7/19 4:00pm
NMSU’s Studio G receives international recognition from UBI Global

Date: 11/07/2019
Writer: Faith Schifani, 575-646-6233, schifani@nmsu.edu

New Mexico State University’s Studio G at Arrowhead Center has been ranked by UBI Global as a world top 20 university business incubator.

Studio G logo
Studio G at Arrowhead Center is New Mexico State University’s student business accelerator. Its mission is to help student entrepreneurs start and grow businesses. (Courtesy Photo) UBI Global logo
In the World Benchmark Study conducted by UBI Global for 2019-2020, Studio G has been ranked as a world top 20 university business incubator out of the more than 1,500 applicants. (Courtesy Photo)

UBI Global is a Swedish-based intelligence company and community specializing in mapping, highlighting and connecting the world of business incubation. Through a network of more than 1,000-member organizations from more than 90 countries worldwide, UBI Global provides matchmaking, ranking, benchmarking and research services to corporations and business incubation programs.

Studio G is NMSU’s student business accelerator founded in 2011. Its mission is to help students start and grow businesses. Since opening they have assisted more than 1,700 student entrepreneurs and helped them raise more than $6,000,000 in investment and grants. In fiscal year 2019, Studio G ventures hired more than 300 people. Studio G has 14 locations including NMSU Las Cruces campus, NMSU Alamogordo, NMSU Carlsbad, NMSU Grants, Burrell College of Osteopathic Medicine, Doña Ana Community College, Eastern New Mexico University, Navajo Technical University, New Mexico Tech, San Juan College, Sandia National Laboratories, Santa Fe Community College, University of New Mexico and Western New Mexico University.

For the World Benchmark Study 2019-2020, 1,580 programs were assessed and 364 programs located in 78 countries were benchmarked.

“The international recognition is huge for us,” said Kramer Winingham, director of Studio G at Arrowhead Center. “We know we are doing great things at Arrowhead and it’s exciting to see how we compare to other programs around the world. We believe the award will help us bring more resources and opportunities to the student entrepreneurs in our programs.”

Previous awardees from the U.S. include Chicago’s 1871 affiliated with the University of Chicago, Northwestern University and University of Illinois; Los Angeles Cleantech Incubator affiliated with UCLA, Caltech and University of Southern California; Emerging Technology Center affiliated with the University of Maryland and Johns Hopkins University; and Texas A&M University’s Startup Aggieland.

UBI Global’s studies have been featured on BBC Radio, The Chicago Tribune, Le Figaro, Der Standard, The Huffington Post, The Irish Times, France 3 and many other media outlets around the world.

For more information about Studio G, Arrowhead Center or this award recognition, contact Winingham at jkramer@nmsu.edu or visit https://arrowheadcenter.nmsu.edu/program/studio-g/



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[l] at 11/7/19 4:00pm
NMSU to add new degree option, plant health management

Date: 11/07/2019
Writer: Victoria Balderrama, 575-646-1614, vbalde@nmsu.edu

The New Mexico State University Entomology, Plant Pathology and Weed Science department will add the plant health management option under the agricultural biology major beginning in fall 2020.

Student examining plant
Drew Garnett, graduate student and research assistant in agricultural biology, checks a cotton plant for beet armyworm damage in a research plot at New Mexico State University’s Agricultural Science Center at Artesia. Beginning in fall 2020 the agricultural biology major will add the plant health management option. (Courtesy photo)

The curriculum committee of EPPWS has made it a top priority to organize this option. One member of the committee, Brian Schutte, associate professor of weed science in the College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences, said there is a high demand of students interested in learning more about plants.

“The department recognizes there is a career opportunity that is not being addressed,” said Schutte. “Our students can piece this together on their own but we can help them get into these fields. So, we are keeping to our mission as a department and as a university to help students.”

Similar to the pest biology and management option, plant health management will focus more on plant health and teach the skills necessary for identifying and addressing problems in plant health management.

Students will gain understanding of the impacts of diseases, insects and weeds on plant health, become knowledgeable on environmental consequences of management strategies for improving plant health and acquire problem-solving skills that will enable them to develop sustainable solutions for preserving plant health.

With these proficiencies, students will be able to pursue careers in the crop protection industries, supervisory positions in the landscape maintenance industry and graduate education opportunities in pest biology and management.

The plant health management option is for students interested in learning about sustainable strategies for promoting the health of plants that are foundational to strong agricultural economies.

Students majoring in agricultural biology will be able to select the plant health management option beginning fall semester 2020.



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[l] at 11/6/19 4:00pm
Apache Point ranked No. 2 among U.S. college observatories

Date: 11/06/2019
Writer: Minerva Baumann, 575-646-7566, mbauma46@nmsu.edu

Apache Point Observatory, operated by New Mexico State University and owned by the Astrophysical Research Consortium, is ranked second by Collegerank.net among the top 35 college observatories in the country for 2019.

Telescopes on a mountaintop
Apache Point Observatory, near Cloudcroft, New Mexico, is home to four telescopes: the 2.5 meter Sloan Foundation telescope (left); the 0.5 meter ARC Small Aperture Telescope (ARCSAT) and New Mexico State University's 1.0 meter telescope (center); and the 3.5 meter Astrophysical Research Consortium telescope (right). In the distance, the tiny spike above the trees to the far right is the National Solar Observatory. (Courtesy photo by Dan Long) Star-filled night sky over Apache Point Observatory
The lack of light pollution at the Apache Point Observatory is among the criteria contributing to their No. 2 ranking among the top 35 college observatories in the country. APO sits on a mountain 9,200 feet above sea level. The night sky seen from APO is among the darkest in the U.S. (NMSU photo by Josh Bachman) Inside view of the 3.5 meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory
The inside of the Astrophysical Research Consortium 3.5 meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory. Apache Point with its four telescopes has been ranked second among the top 35 college observatories in the nation. (NMSU photo by Josh Bachman)

sts on the talents, innovation, commitment and vision of some pretty great astronomers,” said Mark Klaene, director of operations at Apache Point for more than 10 years.

The No. 1 ranking goes to Haleakala Observatory at the University of Hawaii. Others among the top 35 include Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics at Harvard University, Palomar Observatory at California Institute of Technology and Haystack Observatory at Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

APO, located in Sunspot, about 18 miles south of Cloudcroft in the Sacramento Mountains, is home to four telescopes: the 3.5 meter ARC telescope; the 2.5 meter Sloan Foundation telescope; the 0.5 meter ARC Small Aperture Telescope and New Mexico State University's 1.0 meter telescope.

“Apache Point Observatory’s mission is to provide low cost, low downtime, high quality astronomical data as efficiently as possible,” Klaene said, “while providing economic and social benefits to the community and New Mexico as well as educating the public and providing a facility conducive for higher education astronomical learning.”

Nancy Chanover, NMSU astronomy professor and director of the ARC 3.5 meter telescope at APO, was one of the first graduate students to use the facility for her dissertation research in 1994.

“It had been discovered that a comet had fragmented into 21 pieces and was going to impact Jupiter in July 1994, so there was a worldwide campaign with every telescope available to observe that,” said Chanover. “So I was in the right place at the right time with this new telescope. I was able to make those observations, which helped to kick start my career.”

As APO celebrates its 25th anniversary this year, Chanover, who as ARC director works closely with seven collaborating universities, estimates as many as 1,000 researchers have used these facilities to make their discoveries. The field of astronomy has evolved substantially over the past 25 years, yet APO has remained a relevant, valuable asset to ARC member institutions.

“In today’s world, a lot of astronomy is being done with very large scale surveys where some of the some of the skills that students learn in their graduate programs are focused on how to manipulate large databases, how to evaluate information from millions of galaxies instead of looking at just one or two at a time,” Chanover said. “APO’s training and education mission remains focused on teaching students how astronomical data are collected and analyzed, so they can better understand what is in the large survey databases. APO also has evolved to be responsive to new discoveries of time-varying astronomical phenomena, which often require quick turn-round telescopic observations in order to be characterized.”

In ranking the top 35 college observatories, Collegerank.net scored the observatories based on four main criteria: the altitude (those 5,000 feet or more above sea level received extra points), weather (each was given a Clear Skies rating), number of telescopes and light pollution. Special points were added for diverse and specialized technologies. Bonus points were given for noteworthy aspects of the observatory, the most common being those listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
APO sits on a mountain 9,200 feet above sea level. The night sky seen from APO is among the darkest in the U.S.

Chanover gives credit to Klaene and the staff at APO for keeping facilities at the 25-year-old observatory in excellent condition – ready for the next generation of astronomers. Klaene insists the observatory’s success is a team effort.

“APO is where it is today because of the founders and scientists, but also the staff who are dedicated, hard-working and smart,” Klaene said. “They all understand that after safety, the highest priority is if the weather is clear, the telescopes are observing at the highest efficiency and quality we can deliver, every minute of every night.”

For a complete list of the CollegeRank.net ranking and methodology, please visit https://www.collegerank.net/amazing-college-observatories/.



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[l] at 11/6/19 4:00pm
NMSU College of Business awards $272,652 in scholarships for 2019-2020

Date: 11/06/2019
Writer: Carlos Andres Lopez, 575-646-1955, carlopez@nmsu.edu

With support from donors, the College of Business at New Mexico State University will award 130 scholarships – totaling $272,652 – to an estimated 185 students for the 2019-2020 academic year. The total reflects an overall increase from the previous academic year.

A man gives a speech.
Caleb Gattis, a business student at New Mexico State University, speaks during the College of Business’s annual scholarship luncheon Oct. 4 at the New Mexico Farm and Ranch Heritage Museum in Las Cruces. Gattis is one of an estimated 185 business students who have received scholarships for the 2019-2020 academic year. (Courtesy photo by Jack Diven) A man and woman stand next one another.
Jim Hoffman, dean of the College of Business at New Mexico State University, stands with Margaret Hardin, the college’s 2019 Distinguished Alumna, at the college’s scholarship luncheon Oct. 4 at the New Mexico Farm and Ranch Heritage Museum in Las Cruces. (Courtesy photo by Jack Diven)

The college celebrated its donors and scholarship recipients during its annual fall scholarship luncheon Friday, Oct. 4, at the New Mexico Farm and Ranch Heritage Museum in Las Cruces.

“This is an opportunity for us to show our donors how much we value their support and how their generosity is making a difference in our students’ lives,” College of Business Dean Jim Hoffman said. “Student success is our top priority. But that’s often contingent on financial assistance, and scholarships can be game-changers for many of our students.”

The college offers more than 150 scholarships for undergraduate business students and more than 30 for graduate and doctoral business students, Hoffman added.

“The luncheon is a great display of the culture of student support surrounding the College of Business. We are grateful to all our donors who demonstrate what is possible with education and model generosity in success by giving back to student scholarships,” said Tina Byford, interim vice president of University Advancement.

During the luncheon, Caleb Gattis, an undergraduate business student and recipient of James R. Hanssen Endowed Scholarship, shared how scholarships helped him attend NMSU.

“I grew up here in Las Cruces, and I was raised by a single mom. And while she had great success in her career, I saw some of the challenges that she faced since she didn’t have a college education,” Gattis said. “I knew I wanted to go to college, but I had to pay for it myself – which I’m really grateful for because I have a better appreciation for the value of my education.”

Since the New Mexico Lottery Scholarship didn’t cover all of his college expenses, Gattis also applied for other scholarships offered by the College of Business and took out student loans.

“With that financial assistance, a majority of which is scholarships, I’m able to pay for my school in full, and it’s really allowed me to get the most out of my education,” said Gattis, who expects to graduate in May with a bachelor’s degree in business administration in finance.

Margaret Hardin, the 2019 Distinguished Alumna for the College of Business who created the Stephen Hardin Endowed International Travel Scholarship in honor of her father, also spoke at the luncheon.

“My career has taken many unexpected turns since graduating from NMSU, not the least of which is the globalization of companies in many industries and at many sizes. In choosing how I wanted to support New Mexico State, I wanted to provide a student the opportunity to view the globalization of trade first hand,” said Hardin, who earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration in economics and business computer systems in 1994 from NMSU.

After earning a master’s degree in business administration from the University of Chicago, Hardin started her career at Procter & Gamble. She later joined the start-up company Munchkin, Inc., where she served as the chief financial officer, chief operating officer and president, helping double the company’s revenues.

In 2013, she moved into her current position as the chief operating officer for Ergobaby, a company that designs award-winning baby carriers sold in more than 70 countries.

For more information about scholarships offered by the College of Business, visit https://business.nmsu.edu/students/other/scholarships/.



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[l] at 11/5/19 4:00pm
NMSU among U.S. News & World Report Best Global Universities 2020

Date: 11/05/2019
Writer: Tiffany Acosta, 575-646-3929, tfrank@nmsu.edu

New Mexico State University was recognized on the sixth annual U.S. News & World Report Best Global Universities 2020 rankings. NMSU is among 1,500 institutions in 81 countries listed, and this year NMSU tied for 710th.

Campus reflected in glass.
According to the U.S. News & World Report, NMSU is listed on the Best Global Universities 2020 rankings. The list features 1,500 institutions from 81 countries. (NMSU photo by Josh Bachman)

NMSU also was listed on three subject rankings; 143rd in space science, tied for 474th in engineering and tied for 477th in plant and animal science.

The rankings are based on 13 indictors measuring academic research performance along with global and regional reputations. Rankings indicators are weighted to determine the formula, and they include global research reputation (12.5 percent), regional research reputation (12.5 percent), publications (10 percent), books (2.5 percent), conferences (2.5 percent), normalized citation impact (10 percent), total citations (7.5 percent), number of publications that are among the 10 percent most cited (12.5 percent), percentage of total publications that are among the 10 percent most cited (10 percent), internal collaboration (5 percent), percentage of total publications with internal collaboration (5 percent), number of highly cited papers that are among the top 1 percent most cited in their respective field (5 percent) and percentage of total publications that are among the top 1 percent most highly cited papers (5 percent).

To view the complete list visit https://www.usnews.com/education/best-global-universities/rankings.



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