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[l] at 11/25/22 10:43am
WINDOW ROCK The Gilbert Highland football team garnered the No. 2 seed in the Arizona 6A playoffs. The Hawks (7-3 overall) will host No. 7 Salpointe Catholic tonight at 7 p.m. with Diné player Mason Lister having a starting role. “I really like playing for this team, and our success comes from all of our coaches,” said Lister, who is originally from the Page area. “It’s way different down here,” he said of the opportunity he’s gained playing for the Highland football team. “We have offensive and defensive coordinators that really help us prepare for each game.” Lister has been part of the program since his freshman year. He made the varsity team at the tail end of his sophomore season, and last year he was deep in the depth chart as he wasn’t able to get that much playing time. “I was kind of disappointed, but that was my motivation,” said Lister, who starts at nose tackle. “It motivated me to start every game this year. I wanted it more than anybody around me for my position.” Highland defensive coordinator Jason Lyons said his pupil had to wait his turn as last year’s squad was full of talent, with the Hawks winning the 6A state title. “I saw his potential right away as a sophomore, Lyons said. One of the biggest challenges Mason had wasnt necessarily in football; it was in the classroom. Hes worked extremely hard to improve there and correct that. Hes become quite a strong student in that time, he said. The football potential was always there. It was just about finding that consistency.” Lyons said he’d noticed a big difference in Lister’s work ethic in the latter part of his junior year, which helped him earn a starting spot. “He showed up every day, and he’s really become a leader for our other kids through example,” he said. “I’ve called him our Tasmanian Devil because he just creates havoc on the interior in a way that we havent had many kids do that in years.” Lyons said his pupil had been the best defensive lineman this year. Through nine games, he’s tallied 17 tackles, with 14 of those assisted. “His production on the field speaks for itself,” Lyons said. “He does a good job of capturing that consistency that hes been working toward. He’s a kid that is going to bring it to every single play.” And while the Hawks have earned one of the top seeds in the 6A division, the defending state champs were hoping to make the Open Division bracket. Since its inception in 2019, the Arizona Interscholastic Association has pooled the top eight teams from the 4A, 5A, and 6A conferences and put them in one state championship bracket based on computer ranking systems. “Last year, we were No. 9, which put us the No. 1 seed in the 6A division, and not in the open,” Highland head coach Brock Farrel said. “This year, we were No. 10, which puts us No. 2 in the 6A division, again not in the open division. “I think were good enough to compete with teams in the open division, he added. Unfortunately, were missing it by one game every year. Farrel said the next best thing they can do is defend their 6A state title. That is what is in front of us, so were gonna try to win the games that are in front of us, he said. “I like our chances, and I think we’re playing really well.” “We should have made the open,” Lister chimed in. “We deserved to be there, and we want to show that they messed up, not putting us in the open bracket.” The post Tasmanian Devil: Diné nose tackle creating havoc for Highland football team appeared first on Navajo Times.

[Category: Football]

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[l] at 11/23/22 3:30am
WINDOW ROCK She envisioned happiness, optimism, and hope, ultimately putting Hózhǫ́ǫ́jí into the hearts of anguished mothers, grandmothers, and fathers. So, Leandra Yazzie from Blue Gap, Arizona, created a design encapsulating her vision. She drew a sun that beamed sun rays meant to bring good healing. In its midst, she drew dancing birds to signify a renewal of tranquility. Four of the birds, enshrined in a circle, would bring balance, hózhó, and healing. And the color red, which seems to have been woven throughout the blanket, would represent the missing and murdered Indigenous relatives. Known as the Healing Blanket, Yazzie’s creation, as part of raising awareness of people who’ve been missing or murdered, provides an opportunity to heal. On Friday, Yazzie and her sponsors, Cellular One and Pendleton Woolen Mills, a family-owned business from Portland, Oregon, presented the blanket to families grieving or searching for their loved ones. Before Yazzie spoke, she had a chance to hear the plights of all the families seeking solace and the truth. She heard mothers and fathers, grandmothers, and sisters, release the anguish they’ve been experiencing since losing their loved ones. She did not anticipate the weight of the pains the families carried with them. “It is so overwhelming,” Yazzie said. “They’re still unsure; they’re still looking for people.” Yazzie had a chance to explain what she hoped her creation and design could do for the families. “I know it’s hard,” Yazzie’s voice quivered on Friday night. “But when you see that light, hopefully, you feel uplifted.” Hearing the cries Navajo Times | Sharon Chischilly Ethelene Denny, the mother of Jamie Lynette Yazzie, wipes her tears during the Healing Blanket Ceremony Friday Night at the Navajo Nation Museum in Window Rock. According to a Cellular One press release, the blanket is a special artist edition made to help raise funds for the Navajo Missing Murdered Diné Relatives, a nonprofit organization. The proceeds from the blanket sales will be donated to MMDR. The event was held at the Navajo Nation Museum auditorium in Window Rock. The small theater quickly filled. Families brought posters and large photographs of their loved ones and placed them on the stage next to a table stacked with the blankets. Alongside the MMDR logo, families placed images of their missing and murdered loved ones that seemed to stare out at the audience. Just about all of the posters had messages of justice and MMIW written on them. Overall, 29 families attended the ceremony, Navajo Nation Council Delegate Amber Crotty said on Tuesday. Yazzie sat amongst the crowd and watched as each family walked onto the stage to accept a blanket with her design. She listened to their cries silently. The family of Jamie Yazzie, who was last seen in Piñon, Arizona, on June 30, 2019, accepted a blanket. According to the FBI, Yazzie’s remains were found in November of last year on the Hopi reservation. A suspect has since been arrested in late July. Tre C. James is accused of fatally shooting Yazzie. He is facing first-degree murder. Yazzie’s grandmother, Mary James from Piñon, spoke to the crowd about her granddaughter Jamie. She spoke in Navajo and said she’s been affected by her murder. “Shitsóí kǫ́ǫ́dí, shitsʼą́ą́ʼ bigáál dah ndiitʼiʼo, kǫ́ǫ́dí, baa shíniʼo éíya hónzahdi hoolzhish, ákoh,” she said. James shared her frustrations and highlighted the limitations of law enforcement and jurisdictional issues that have long plagued the reservation. 202 missing Indigenous persons This year, the FBI created a website to broadcast how many Indigenous people are currently missing in New Mexico and the Navajo Nation. To date, they’ve compiled a list of 202 people, which began with 177 in July. While the lists creation has slowly been sputtering to life, for families like Jamie’s family, its progression continues to frustrate them. James recounted a conversation with Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez a few days after Jamie went missing. She said she saw Nez leading a parade of law enforcement who arrived to begin a search for her granddaughter. She asked the president if he could help them find her. “Jonathan Nez tʼáhndę́ę́ʼ aląąjįʼ chʼíníyá kodę́ę́ʼ bikéédę́ę́ʼ łaʼnáá deiyíkááh kodę́ę́,” James remembered. “Áádóó Jonathan Nez abidíiniid, ‘Shiyáázh, ʼááshǫǫdí kǫ́ǫ́dí shitsóí doo bééhoozindah dį́į́ʼ yiskánídą́ą́ʼ. Haʼtʼáodah shá bindíílnish díí kǫ́ǫ́ siláo da nilį́níí kǫ́ǫ́ holǫ́ǫ́ dóó nááná kǫ́ǫ́ nidaʼalkaahígíí shį́į́ dah hólǫ́. Shá bichiʼįʼ dííłʼaał dóó shá yindadoolnish díídí shí éí shitsóí doo akóínshníí dah,’ dishnóo. Akótʼáo éíya éí bichʼįʼ haasdzííʼ.” After she pleaded with Nez to help them, she said Nez told her it was not up to him. “Ndę́ę́ʼ, ‘éí shí éí doo bee shóhóólníídah. Aadę́ę́ʼ yigáłígíí abididííniił,’ nóo, éíshį́į́ éí investigators anáánátʼáo,” James said. She then turned her attention to the investigating officer and said to him, “ʼááshǫǫdí shiyáázh kweʼé hotʼáo adíílííl, ʼááshǫǫdí shitsóí doo béé hoozindah.” She said she reminded Nez he was the leader, law enforcement worked for him, and he had the power to make things happen. After her pleas, she said nothing more happened for them. “Áden. Siláondi ʼáadoo łaʼ nihxaa níyáa, tʼóó nihxí tʼéíya díí kǫ́ǫ́, nandę́ę́ʼígíí tʼéí nihxándantxáo hoolzhiizh,” James said. “Áden, siláo éí łaʼ ʼáado chʼínyáadah, áden.” Issue rages on Jamie Yazzie’s case not being handled in a manner acceptable to their families is not uncommon. Pamela Foster, whose daughter Ashlynne Mike, who could have been graduating from high school in spring 2023, said she wished she did not have to be in attendance. “I wish I didn’t have to be. It’s really sad the way that we all have to be here because we all know someone that we have lost,” Foster said. “And we all have family members who are missing or who have been murdered. So, I never wanted to be part of this. But unfortunately, I come from a family who’s had a lot of traumas.” Foster told the audience she lost her mother a few months before graduating high school. “They have not found the person who committed that heinous crime to this day. I hope that one day I’ll be able to have that energy to be able to start looking into her case,” she said. Of her little girl, Foster said “six years, six months, and 17 days” had passed since she last saw Ashlynne, who was sexually assaulted, strangled, and bludgeoned with a tire iron before left to die not far from the Shiprock pinnacle in May 2016. “The last thing the children all remember is that they got on the bus, and she waved goodbye to her dad and said, ‘I love you,’” Foster shared. Tom Begaye Jr. abducted Mike, 11 at the time, and her 9-year-old brother on May 2, 2016. Begaye is serving a life sentence at a federal prison for her murder and the abductions. When her children were abducted, Foster said the tribe did not have 911, did not have enough police officers on duty, and did not have sufficient cellular connectivity for an Amber Alert system. “All of those were hurdles we had to face when my children went missing,” she said. “There were two police officers on duty that day, which made looking for my children extremely hard.” The nightmarish ordeal spurred Foster into action. She began speaking to political leaders at the local and national levels. Through her advocacy, Congress passed the Ashlynne Mike Amber Alert in Indian Country Act, which was signed into law by President Donald Trump. The law enhances the training and technical assistance that tribes may receive. It also paves the way for tribes to access state Amber Alert plans and allows tribes to integrate their Amber plans with those of the state or region. The Navajo Nation Police Department has since hired a police chief. While 911 and addressing, as well as broadband connectivity, continue to hinder the tribe, the police’s Facebook page has been used to share information that includes missing-person police posters and information about the missing person. This year, Navajo police have found 36 people, one as young as eight months old. While it highlights a proactive and positive step for the department, they have also identified nearly 20 people who continue to be missing. The most recent missing person police shared was on Jerrissa Mae Harris, which they posted on Tuesday. By Wednesday, police wrote “LOCATED” across her photograph, indicating she’s been found. Resiliency and strength Harris marks the 37th person found or located by Navajo police in 2022. Overall, 77 people in the Navajo Nation continue to remain missing, according to the Navajo police. Their list includes 28 females and 49 males. The list Navajo police have is shared with the FBI, who have added the names to their list. Most of the people the FBI identified as missing have been compiled from other law enforcement agencies. The family of Zachariah Juwaun Shorty was also in attendance. Shorty, 23, at the time of his murder, was shot to death. According to the FBI, he was last seen alive on July 21, 2020, in the area of Journey Inn in Farmington. His mother, Vangie Randall-Shorty, who’s become her son’s staunch advocate, said she’d continue being his voice and would never stop seeking justice for him. Randall-Shorty said on Friday during the Healing Blanket ceremony she never imagined she’d experience losing her child to murder. “I just encourage each and every one of you to keep fighting for your loved ones,” she said. She shared the moment she learned of how Zachariah died. “When Zach––I was lost, and I was so devastated when I was told he was murdered. Zach died of multiple gunshot wounds. To this day, an arrest has not been made, and as his mom, I’m going to continue fighting for him and being the voice,” Randall-Shorty said as she struggled to maintain her composure. Randall-Shorty has carried signs and banners in all of the tribal fairs this year in hopes of obtaining any information that would aid in the capture and arrest of her son’s killer or killers. The FBI is offering a $10,000 reward. After nearly five hours, Leandra Yazzie grappled for words as she attempted to describe her experience. “I didn’t anticipate the number of people and the number of cases that have just gone cold,” she said. At the same time, Yazzie said the family’s resiliencies and strengths inspired her. “The strength of people coming together creates one loud voice,” she said. Yazzie said when she was approached, she knew the healing blanket would begin as a rug. Growing up with her grandmother, her aunt, and other Navajo weavers, she knew it would start as a rug. “So, I came up with that,” she said. For her, the design, the symbolism behind the sun, the sun rays, and the birds all represent healing, a Hózhǫ́ǫ́jí that she hopes can help the families she heard on Friday. “It’s a little piece of Navajo, our culture in that design,” Yazzie said. “They’ve been through so much. This has to be uplifting.” And to the families, she told them, “I hope you guys find peace.” Pendleton has given no exact date on when the healing blankets will go on sale. Anyone with information into Shorty’s murder or on any missing person is encouraged to call their local law enforcement agency, or the Albuquerque FBI office at 505-889-1300, the Phoenix office at 623-466-1999, or any of their 54 other field offices located throughout the country. The post Healing blanket offers rejuvenation, Hózhó for grieving families appeared first on Navajo Times.

[Category: News]

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[l] at 11/23/22 3:30am
What does the recent tribal election mean? First of all, it is simple. The Navajo people were neither pleased nor supportive of the Navajo Nation leadership on the executive and legislative sides this past four years. Lets begin by looking at those numbers on the legislative side. Only eight delegates were voted back, but only five of the eight were elected back overwhelmingly. The other three delegates barely slipped by, which means the people were not happy with those three delegates either. Of the four Council committees, the Resource and Development Committee and Budget and Finance Committee lost 90 percent of their members. That means the people were not pleased with any of those committee members or the committees themselves. Its clear that former members of the RDC and B&F should not be on those committees in the next four years, except for Delegate Crotty and Delegate Slater. You have five delegates that were reelected with overwhelming numbers, which means the Navajo people said they are doing a good job. Those five delegates should be chairs and vice chairs of the committees. The delegates are A. Crotty, E. Newton, V. James, O. Tso, with C. Slater maybe being considered a vice chair. On the executive side, all the appointees and division directors must go. Economic Development and Natural Resource executive directors were clearly where voters wanted competent applicants. The problem is that Navajo experts from outside the reservation come with a cost. Still, if the nation invests in those professional Navajos, the benefits could be huge, especially if they have good track records. Successful models that work are nearby. Navajo Nation just has to look at Farmington and its low unemployment rate. Both Farmingtons Chamber of Commerce and Four Corners Economic Development have outstanding professionals that help create jobs and bring tax-paying companies to the region. Sixty percent of the Four Corners regional workforce is Navajo. This recent tribal election was a wake-up call for the Navajo voters. The old guard is not something the Navajo people want for their future. Thanks for letting me state what I see with this election. Marie Rose Shiprock The post Letters | General election a wake-up call appeared first on Navajo Times.

[Category: Letters]

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[l] at 11/23/22 3:29am
WINDOW ROCK The Navajo Board of Election Supervisors had one more hurdle to leap. Related See all Election 2022 coverage. -- Related See all Election 2022 coverage. The certification of the Nov. 8 general election in the Navajo Nation Presidential results were almost not certified during a board meeting that was held on Tuesday in Window Rock. As the resolution was being read into record that would certify the presidential and vice-presidential results, Navajo Board of Election Supervisors Chairperson Melvin Harrison interrupted the reading and asked Navajo Board of Election Supervisors Vice Chair Raymond Maxx if the board was still intending to go into executive session to discuss a request for a recount by second place finishers Jonathan Nez and Chad Abeyta. “It was to my understanding that this resolution will be the last one because we need to go into executive session on this one,” Harrison said, who was attending the board meeting via telephonically on Tuesday. “Am I mistaken on that? Because remember, we need to go into Executive Session on this one because we need to talk about the request from candidate Jonathan Nez, candidate Chad Abeyta.” Navajo Times | Sharon ChischillyIncumbent Jonathan Nez and his running mate Chad Abeyta requested the Navajo Board of Election Supervisors to do a recount. After a short executive session, it was denied Nov. 22, 2022. Unofficially, Nez and Abeyta were defeated by 3,499 votes in the Nov. 8 election. Candidates Buu Nygren and Richelle Montoya won by an unofficial vote of 34,568. Nez and Abeyta received an unofficial vote count of 31,069 votes, according to the Navajo Election Administration Nov. 8 election results. Spokesperson for the Nez-Abeyta campaign Jared Touchin, wrote in a text message, the campaign was not asking for a recount. “In the written request it states that if there are discrepancies reported or found then the board has the authority to do a recount,” Touchin wrote on Tuesday. The Nygren-Montoya camp were pleased that the election board certified the results. “I was told they certified it and I’m happy with the certification,” Nygren said through a text message on Tuesday. In June, former presidential candidate Dineh Benally began questioning the validity of the voting machines. After the primary election was completed on Aug. 2, several more former presidential candidates filed grievances. During the week-long verification, former candidates Ethel Branch, Rosanna Jumbo-Fitch, and Emily Ellison, as well as designated poll watchers representing Nygren-Montoya and Nez-Abeyta, documented the number of discrepancies, including the age of the voting machines, the lack of training poll workers received, and how mail-in and early voting ballots were handled. As Maxx, Harrison and the election board continued addressing the former candidates’ concerns, the general election was not impacted. Early voters stood in line at the Navajo Election Administration office in Window Rock to cast their votes. On Nov. 8, the Navajo voters made sweeping changes to the tribal government that included ousting the Nez administration. Voters also cleaned house on the Navajo Nation Council side and elected nine women, who’ll be taking the oath of office on Jan. 10. In the council race, incumbent Kee Allen Begay requested to have all five chapters he represents to be recounted. By the evening, challenger and winner of the Nov. 8 general election Crystalyne Curley remained the winner as she will represent the following chapters: Tachee/Blue Gap, Many Farms, Nazlini, Tselani/Cottonwood and Low Mountain. The recount that was released on Monday had Curley with 1,519 votes to Begay’s 1,510. Unofficially, Curley won 1,493 to 1,480. Maxx said two challenges – Edison Wauneka’s and Matthew Tso’s were dismissed. One more challenge – Leonard Tsosie’s was still on going. For the presidential side, a letter from former vice-presidential candidate Chad Abeyta listed 13 issues, but it was dismissed, Maxx said. “The letter came in late and missed the deadline, the ten days. Therell be response in the form of letter back to them,” Maxx said. “And basically, to say, ‘We will not accept the request to do recount and all the other thirteen requests that they made.” One of the requests made, Maxx said, was a request was made for names of voters. “Its explained in there that, confidentially, laws prevent us from submitting those. So, that letter should explain everything,” he said. “We move forward and we certified all the elected positions except the ones that are still in at the Hearings and Appeals office. Those are the ones that well come back to and take care of once theyre clear the hurdles over there.” For Maxx, who was not re-elected, said the transparency and working together were what he learned and attributes as to why the general election and Tuesday’s certification were not interrupted. “Theyre all on the same page with the board. So, its just a matter of everybody working together and working as a team and staying focused on the issues,” he said after the election board adjourned. “And what we learned from that is a lot of things need to happen going forward – the policies, rules and regulations need to be changed and needs to be also have proper resources to conduct a good fair election where every vote is counted.” A location as to where the inauguration will take place has not been determined. The post Presidential election results certified appeared first on Navajo Times.

[Category: Election 2022, News]

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[l] at 11/23/22 3:28am
TSÉBIGHÁHOODZÁNÍ The best way to learn Diné Bizaad is by actively listening, said president-elect Buu Van Nygren, who improved his Navajo fluency over the last four years. Nygren, 35, is one of the few young Diné who speaks the language fluently – that contains variations in Northern and Central Navajo pronunciations. Nygren said he speaks the Northern dialect, sometimes to the degree that speakers of other agencies and the standard form of Diné Bizaad might not understand him. “It’s just being from Northern Navajo,” Nygren said in an interview with the Navajo Times. “It’s just growing up in Northern Navajo. “Kind of like my key thing––is speaking that language over there (in an agency): ahwééh––the differences,” Nygren said. “So, even in my speeches, I try not to say words that are too different. I try to stay as neutral as I can in a lot of my speeches (because) someone from Western might be listening to me, and I don’t want to be speaking in (a) dialect that’s a little bit foreign to them.” Nygren says people often correct him when he’s speaking Navajo. “I get that all the time, but it’s to their region––correctness to their region,” he explained. “So, I don’t take any offense to that. I’m always open to learning. “That’s the secret to learning the language,” he said. “You’ve got to be open to a little bit of criticism. (People) tell you because they appreciate you because they love you. Like, ‘Hey, she’awéé, shiyázhí, doo ‘áhót’áo ‘ádííniida. Díidi, ‘áhót’áo ‘ajíniih.’” ‘Passion for the people’ Delegate Nathaniel Brown, the chair of the Diné Bizaad Subcommittee, said he spoke to Nygren and vice president-elect Richelle Montoya about the language that evolved over time. Brown has said some Navajo words are old and have changed very little over time. “I did bring this up to them about Diné Bizaad, and they do really support that,” Brown said Tuesday morning. “I talked to them about how nihizaad is a huge part of our healing as a people from these historical traumas. “The latest trauma that we still live in is the pandemic, this COVID-19––it has really taken a lot,” he said. “People are hurting and grieving. Dinék’ehjígo, when you are in deep depression from loss, language is our healing tool; it’s our kétł’óól, our foundation of who we are as Diné––Nihookáá Diyin Diné.” Brown said Nygren speaks fluent Diné Bizaad and has observed that the older men and women across the Nation appreciate him and know that he speaks with passion when he speaks to the Navajo people. “He speaks loud, and they (elders) say he shows passion for the people and the land,” Brown said t’áá Dinék’ehjígo. Fluent Navajo Nygren says now that he’s finished with school and work outside the Nation, he’s returned home and has been living in Diné Bikéyah full-time for over three years, during which he heard a lot more of the language spoken. “Before, when I (was selected as former President Joe Shirley Jr.’s running mate in 2018), I was working outside (the Nation), and I’d come home once a month and be with family––just coming back here and there,” Nygren explained. “Now, I’m hearing a lot more Navajo, and that’s what’s critical about saving our language is while our elders are here, while our people speak really good Navajo.” Nygren says he would like to set aside money to build a comprehensive Diné Bizaad program in which Diné youth wanting to speak advanced/fluent Navajo can learn. “No matter where they are,” Nygren said. “Wherever they go, it should be free because the best way to learn Navajo is to hear. “That would be beneficial to everybody,” he said. “That’s where I came up with the concept of, ‘If you’re hearing it, then you can really learn the language.’ So, if you’re hearing it through the phone/laptop or some sort of Navajo language program, then you’re really gonna be able to learn it.” The young president-elect says when he runs into older people, he always asks them if they could speak to him in Diné Bizaad as a courtesy. “I’m always trying to find more people to speak Navajo to me,” said Nygren, who can easily adjust to the dialects in each of the five agencies. “But it all depends,” he added. “If I get enough elders speaking to me beforehand, I kind of adapt to a lot of those dialects right before I give a talk.” Brown said it’s never too late to learn anything, including Diné Bizaad. “It’s just a matter of immersing yourself in it,” Brown said. “In Navajo, we need to change something drastically. We need to open up our chapter houses and make them into a place where people can gather regularly after work and make it like a language learning center. “That way, we can make it fun, and kids can enjoy singing,” he said. “It is challenging, but it is doable.” Brown said shaming those trying to learn the language isn’t helpful and that a fluent speaker shouldn’t laugh about them. “Let’s encourage and teach,” Brown added. “Language shaming needs to go.” The post Nygren says best way to learn Diné Bizaad is to ‘hear’ appeared first on Navajo Times.

[Category: Politics]

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[l] at 11/23/22 3:27am
By Diane Joy Schmidt Special to the Times ALBUQUERQUE Now that all the shouting is mostly over, with the losers making a few feeble squeaks, we can look at where things are headed nationally and in the Southwest. Related See all Election 2022 coverage. -- Related See all Election 2022 coverage. The Democrats have hung on to a majority in the U.S. Senate, with a 50 to 49 lead. This means, among other things, that President Biden can continue confirming judges. The last senate race to be decided will not change that, as Vice President Kamala Harris holds a tie-breaking vote if the outcome is 50-50. Senator Raphael Warnock (D-Ga.) and former football star Herschel Walker (R-Ga.) face a recount Dec. 6. The U.S. House is expected to go to Republican control narrowly. As of this writing, Republicans need one more seat before the necessary 218 seats are reached, and currently, they have 217 to the Democrats 206 seats. Sigh of relief A split in Washington, D.C., between the House and Senate, may jam up the governments works a bit. Still, Republicans were disappointed by the number of Trump-backed candidate races they lost, and for the moment, Democrats are feeling a rare sigh of relief. Despite the poor showing by the Republican election deniers, it remains to be seen, after Trump announces his reelection bid Tuesday night from his Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida, what lesson Republicans have learned. President Biden accomplished a tremendous amount in his first two years. While his attempts to get bipartisan support were rebuffed, the country saw significant steps toward environmental improvements and the installation of Interior Secretary Deb Haaland (Laguna). Still, the world is heating up, and there is no sign of climate change slowing. With Russias attempts to control Ukraine and a cold winter ahead in Europe, we will likely see a clamor for more nuclear power plants as an energy source. The nine-member Supreme Court has six conservative and three liberal judges. They are now hearing a case that challenges the Indian Child Welfare Act, established in 1978, to protect Native American children from a long history of being separated from their families and adopted out of their culture into white, Christian families. All tribes are closely watching the case. The Biden Administration and five tribes are defending the law. At stake are the Indian Child Welfare Act and its more significant consequences. If the court rules against Native American adoption rights, it also could undo decades of laws established on the basis that tribes are sovereign nations. At least one conservative judge, Neil Gorsuch, favors the Native position, and justice Brent Cavanaugh seems undecided. The three liberal judges are firmly in favor of defending the law. The decision is not expected until spring. A look ahead Significant issues are ahead for water in the Southwest, including water rights. Scientists have determined that the SouthwestÕs severe megadrought is the worst in 1,200 years. Protection for water in all its forms, including rivers and aquifers, will be an issue in the entire region. New Mexico is seeing all blue, clear skies this week. Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham (D) was reelected, defeating TV weather reporter Mark Ronchetti. New Mexico has three congressional districts. As a result of redistricting to represent the population more fairly, in the 2nd congressional district, incumbent Yvette Herrell (R) lost in a nail-biter to Gabriel Vasquez (D), and now the entire New Mexico congressional delegation going to Washington is a trifecta of Democrats. Grisham is a strong pro-choice supporter of womenÕs health care and has also improved environmental protection. This summer, Grisham passed methane capping legislation developed with input from the gas & oil industry, which has set a new standard for the rest of the United States. Also, in New Mexico, state constitutional Amendment 1 was passed to fund early childhood education. It will fund early childhood education and care and additional funds for public schools out of the states permanent fund. New Mexico Rep. Anthony Allison, Navajo (District 4), who just won reelection, was an outspoken supporter of the measure and said this should mean raises for early childhood teachers as well as for all teachers and result in better retention of teachers. This amendment will mean money to fund the New Mexico Indian Education Act adequately. It grew out of the consolidated Yazzie/Martinez case that in 2018 successfully challenged the states failure to provide students with programs for them to learn. Especially low-income, Native American, English language learners, and students with disabilities. The money is now there to support culturally sensitive programs. New Mexico Native Vote joined with Vote Yes for Kids! to campaign to get out the vote to see its passage. In Arizona, where vote counting is slow, finally, five days after the election, incumbent Gov. Katie Hobbs (D) declared a comfortable victory over former TV personality Kari Lake. In Utah, as expected, virtually all federal and state races were won by Republicans. In the race for southern Utahs District 69, first-time candidate Davina Smith (D-Monument Valley), Navajo, made a credible showing, receiving 40% of the vote, against winner Republican Phil Lyman. jQuery(document).ready(function() { jQuery(".post-meta p").text(function(index, text) { return text.replace('By Navajo Times |', ''); }); }); The post Is it over yet? A look at the elections appeared first on Navajo Times.

[Category: Election 2022]

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[l] at 11/23/22 3:26am
TSÉBIGHÁHOODZÁNÍ He’s gotten back to his normal routine after two terms in office but on Veterans Day, the former Cameron Chapter president wanted to do something special for the community veterans. Navajo Times | Krista AllenLynn Tso uses a two-pronged fork to turn a frybread Nov. 11, when she and her family hosted a free Navajo Taco luncheon for military veterans outside their home in Cameron, Ariz. Milton Tso said Veterans Day is always a notable day for him because his late father, Paul Talker, and his grandfather, Fred Curley, were Korean War veterans. Talker served in the U.S. Army and Curley served in the U.S. Marines. “I’m doing this in their honor,” Tso said Nov. 11 outside his home in Na’ni’á Hasání, Ariz. “Every Navajo family on the reservation––probably in Native American Country, has somebody that’s been in conflict. “We all have veterans in our families,” he said. “We all have somebody that fought in a war on behalf of this country. This is just a small thing.” Tso said he and his wife, Lynn, got up that morning and decided to commemorate the veterans who forged and defended America – a promise of freedom and equality, democracy and justice, possibility and hope. The couple decided to make Navajo Tacos and give them free to the veterans who stop by their home. “My grandson by clan, AJ (Ames) Meyers, he’s done quite a bit for our people by way of firewood delivery––him and his family supply firewood to chapters every year,” Tso explained. “I got a whole of him and asked if he had any firewood that he could donate.” Meyers obliged and delivered firewood to Tso’s home for veterans to take. Warriors on the battlefield Native Americans and Alaska Natives serve in the armed forces at five times the national average and have served with distinction in every major conflict for over 200 years, according to the USO, a charitable organization in serving active-duty service members and military families. And Natives have the highest per-capita involvement of any population to serve in the U.S. military. “We have one of the chapters with the most veterans,” Tso said. “It’s quite an honor to know that we live in a community like that.” Tso said he doesn’t have a list of Na’ni’á Hasání veterans, but there are quite a few. He said he’s noticed a lot of the Korean War veterans are passing on too. “Our Vietnam veterans are getting up there in age, and they’re at the age we need to start helping them in any way we can,” Tso said. Team effort Navajo Times | Krista AllenA freshly made Navajo Taco is topped with tomatoes and other toppings Nov. 11, when the former Cameron Chapter president and his family hosted a free Navajo Taco luncheon for military veterans outside their home in Cameron, Ariz. Tso served as chapter president from 2013 to 2019, during which he led his people and hosted numerous community events. “I do miss it, being in office,” Tso said. “I enjoy helping people––my community. I did the best I could. And that’s all we can ask of our politicians, the new ones coming in and the ones in office.” Today, he’s working for two tour companies – one in Page and one in Flagstaff. “They’ve been keeping me pretty busy,” Tso said. “A few of my community members who were used to seeing me quite often––they ask where I’ve been hiding. I always tell them, ‘I’ve been pretty busy being a family man again and working.’” Tso said the Veterans Day taco luncheon was open to any veteran who came by his home. He and Lynn posted a few signs alongside the roadways. Tso added that the dough to make frybread was donated by Blue Canyon Grill in Cameron and the firewood was donated by AJ (Ames) and his Tuba City-based “Diné Bá’ádeit’į́ – For the People.” The post Free taco luncheon commemorates Cameron veterans appeared first on Navajo Times.

[Category: Community]

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[l] at 11/23/22 3:20am
BLOOMFIELD, N.M. Bloomfield football coach Mike Kovacs couldnt have asked for a better birthday present. Quentin Jodie <qjodie@navajotimes.com> Tue, Nov 22, 2022 at 2:48 PMTo: Ben Winton <ben.winton@gmail.com>, benwinton@cox.netCc: navajotimes <qjodie@navajotimes.com>Best birthday gift!Bobcats win state playoff game for coachBy Quentin JodieNavajo TimesBLOOMFIELD, N.M. — Bloomfield football coach Mike Kovacs couldnt have asked for a better birthday present.On Saturday, his Bloomfield Bobcats reached the 4A state title game with a 45-13 win over the Taos Tigers.“That was one of the things we talked about in the locker room before the game,” Kovacs said. “You know, getting a birthday present like this (was good), but I’m going to be honest with you – it’s not about me.“If you look around here, we have such an awesome school, an awesome facility, and community,” he said. “Being from Bloomfield, one of my big goals being the head coach is I wanted to bring the community back. I think football at the school is a huge thing.”The Bobcats scored on three consecutive drives for a 19-0 lead, improving to 11-1 overall.Defensively, the Kovacs-coached team forced Taos into four turnovers and three punts.“Our defense has been like that all year,” the Bloomfield coach said. “I can’t say enough about coach (Damon) Lynch and his staff.“They do such a great job preparing our kids for every opponent, and this was no different,” he said. “We took (Taos QB Dameon) Ely out of his repertoire, and he’s the heartbeat of their team.”The 32-point win pits the Bobcats against the Silver Colts in Saturday’s state championship game. It is scheduled for 1 p.m. at Bloomfield High School.“I can’t wait,” said senior quarterback Ryan Sharpe, who accounted for four touchdowns on Saturday. “I think its special to play at home, with it being my last high school football game.The top-seeded Colts reached the title game by defeating No. 4 seed Lovington 23-7 in the other semifinal. The meeting on Saturday will be the second for both clubs as Silver defeated the Bobcats, 45-6, on Oct. 7.“They’re a grind-out, hard-nosed team,” Kovacs said of Silver. Theyre gonna fight you in every play, on every down, and so youre gonna have to scratch for every inch. We just got to match that enthusiasm and be in the trenches with them.Sharpe said they remember that earlier game with the Colts, and they’re looking for a better outcome come Saturday.Were gonna go into this week more prepared, he said.The Bloomfield QB completed 8-of-14 passes for 172 yards in last weeks win. His longest pass went for a 74-yard scoring strike to junior wideout Drew Perez.Before that connection, Perez picked off a pass from Taos QB Dameon Ely to set up that drive.Drew had some momentum shifters, Kovacs said.Defensively, Perez finished with two picks, and in the opening drive of the second half, he covered the seven yards needed to extend an 80-yard scoring drive.The Bobcats were facing a fourth-and-7 at their 23-yard line, and Perez advanced the ball to give Bloomfield another set of downs.“Any one thing is going to flip the script,” Kovacs said while alluding to Perez’s fake punt and two picks.While trying not to take any credit, Perez said he was doing his job.“We got a couple of key players injured on the sidelines, and I think we all came together,” he said. “We did this for coach because we owe him everything.“He’s gone thick and thin for this team,” he said. “He put in hours in that office, and we wanted to win this for him.”On the ground, Bloomfield finished the contest with 303 yards, with 110 coming from Jesse Seitzinger. The junior running back accounted for half of the Bobcats’ four rushing TD scores, including one from 54 yards out.Senior Andres Gordo added 49 yards on six carries and one TD before he was sidelined with a shoulder injury in the opening half.The Bobcats also lost the service of sophomore Eli Snell-Martinez in what appeared to be a concussion.Kovacs said their conditions were unknown on Saturday, and their status will be day-by-day.As for earning a spot in the title game, Kovacs said his club took it upon themselves to reach this moment as last year’s team came up short in the state semifinals.“That is what we talked about in June,” he said. “These kids really took it upon their shoulders, and they took it personal … and now we’re gonna to play in the state championship game.“We’re gonna fight our butts off and try to get a win,” he added.Navajo Times | Quentin JodieBloomfield Bobcat Andres Gordo tries to avoid a tackle by the Taos Tigers during last week’s Class 4A state semifinals. Bloomfield advanced to Saturday’s title game with a 45-13 win.Navajo Times | Quentin JodieTaos Tiger Andrew Bair (right) lets the ball go by him in the end zone while being defended by Bloomfield Bobcat Aaron Johnson (34). On Saturday, his Bloomfield Bobcats reached the 4A state title game with a 45-13 win over the Taos Tigers. “That was one of the things we talked about in the locker room before the game,” Kovacs said. “You know, getting a birthday present like this (was good), but I’m going to be honest with you – it’s not about me. “If you look around here, we have such an awesome school, an awesome facility, and community,” he said. “Being from Bloomfield, one of my big goals being the head coach is I wanted to bring the community back. I think football at the school is a huge thing.” The Bobcats scored on three consecutive drives for a 19-0 lead, improving to 11-1 overall. Defensively, the Kovacs-coached team forced Taos into four turnovers and three punts. “Our defense has been like that all year,” the Bloomfield coach said. “I can’t say enough about coach (Damon) Lynch and his staff. “They do such a great job preparing our kids for every opponent, and this was no different,” he said. “We took (Taos QB Dameon) Ely out of his repertoire, and he’s the heartbeat of their team.” The 32-point win pits the Bobcats against the Silver Colts in Saturday’s state championship game. It is scheduled for 1 p.m. at Bloomfield High School. “I can’t wait,” said senior quarterback Ryan Sharpe, who accounted for four touchdowns on Saturday. “I think its special to play at home, with it being my last high school football game. The top-seeded Colts reached the title game by defeating No. 4 seed Lovington 23-7 in the other semifinal. The meeting on Saturday will be the second for both clubs as Silver defeated the Bobcats, 45-6, on Oct. 7. “They’re a grind-out, hard-nosed team,” Kovacs said of Silver. Theyre gonna fight you in every play, on every down, and so youre gonna have to scratch for every inch. We just got to match that enthusiasm and be in the trenches with them. Sharpe said they remember that earlier game with the Colts, and they’re looking for a better outcome come Saturday. Were gonna go into this week more prepared, he said. The Bloomfield QB completed 8-of-14 passes for 172 yards in last weeks win. His longest pass went for a 74-yard scoring strike to junior wideout Drew Perez. Before that connection, Perez picked off a pass from Taos QB Dameon Ely to set up that drive. Drew had some momentum shifters, Kovacs said. Defensively, Perez finished with two picks, and in the opening drive of the second half, he covered the seven yards needed to extend an 80-yard scoring drive. The Bobcats were facing a fourth-and-7 at their 23-yard line, and Perez advanced the ball to give Bloomfield another set of downs. “Any one thing is going to flip the script,” Kovacs said while alluding to Perez’s fake punt and two picks. While trying not to take any credit, Perez said he was doing his job. “We got a couple of key players injured on the sidelines, and I think we all came together,” he said. “We did this for coach because we owe him everything. “He’s gone thick and thin for this team,” he said. “He put in hours in that office, and we wanted to win this for him.” On the ground, Bloomfield finished the contest with 303 yards, with 110 coming from Jesse Seitzinger. The junior running back accounted for half of the Bobcats’ four rushing TD scores, including one from 54 yards out. Senior Andres Gordo added 49 yards on six carries and one TD before he was sidelined with a shoulder injury in the opening half. The Bobcats also lost the service of sophomore Eli Snell-Martinez in what appeared to be a concussion. Kovacs said their conditions were unknown on Saturday, and their status will be day-by-day. As for earning a spot in the title game, Kovacs said his club took it upon themselves to reach this moment as last year’s team came up short in the state semifinals. “That is what we talked about in June,” he said. “These kids really took it upon their shoulders, and they took it personal … and now we’re gonna to play in the state championship game. “We’re gonna fight our butts off and try to get a win,” he added. The post Best birthday gift! Bobcats win state playoff game for coach appeared first on Navajo Times.

[Category: Football]

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[l] at 11/23/22 3:19am
By Barbara Boxleitner Special to the Times GALLUP In his first college cross-country season, Tayan Benson is heading to the mens national championship. Courtesy photo | Eme\bry-Riddle Aeronautical University AthleticsTayan Benson, a former Miyamura standout, is scheduled to run in the NCAA Division II national championship Dec. 2 will running for the Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University men’s cross country team. The Miyamura High School alumnus said he is among eight Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University men who will travel to the NCAA Division II national championship Dec. 2 in University Place, Washington. The freshman said seven Eagles would compete in the race, and he is the seventh. Benson placed seventh among the Eagle finishers in Saturdays South Region championship 10K, his first time completing that distance. He was 50th in the field of 124, as Embry-Riddle finished third among 18 teams and qualified for the national championship. I felt prepared. Weve been working up to this, he said. I was confident that I was ready to race. Over the summer, he trained to become accustomed to the seasons higher mileage total. He ran six times a week with a long run of 8 to 11 miles. He went from 40 miles a week to the 50 to 60 hes been doing this season. Im not a long-distance guy, said Benson, who was recruited for track and field. I didnt come from a background of doing a lot of mileage. I decided to be very safe and gradual. I just built up to where I am now. Early in the season, he started races conservatively and passed runners along the way. As the season progressed, he positioned himself near the front pack and stayed with the leaders as long as he could. His strategy at the regional was to go out comfortable and try to stay comfortable. Try to position myself in a race where I know where Im supposed to be. We know who we have to be around, he said. The last half of the race is just giving whats left and trying to speed up and finish strong. It was a pretty rough course, pretty hilly, and the terrain was kind of rough at parts, Benson said. There were a lot of switchbacks and U-turns. Because of the turns, he said, he had to slow to take them tight, thus reducing momentum. He said he passed about five runners near the end and finished in 33 minutes, 2.2 seconds. I always have an extra gear. I go at the end, he said. I had a lot left in the tank. By the end of it, I realized I had some left. Im satisfied with the time. Before the regional, Benson was the sixth Eagle finisher in the November conference 8K and two other 8Ks. He was fifth among the Eagles in one 8K and eighth among them in another. He will have a short break before he begins training for the indoor track season. He said he expects to compete in longer distances, such as the 3K and 5K, before settling in to the 800-meter and mile, his specialties. The 1,500 would be his main event during the outdoor season. jQuery(document).ready(function() { jQuery(".post-meta p").text(function(index, text) { return text.replace('By Navajo Times |', ''); }); }); The post 7 Embry-Riddle Eagles preparing for X-C national championship appeared first on Navajo Times.

[Category: Track & Field]

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[l] at 11/23/22 3:18am
WINSLOW The pros of having a 35-second shot clock paid some dividends for the Winslow girls basketball team. Earlier this year, the Arizona Interscholastic Association approved using the shot clock for the first time in basketball for the teams in the 3A to 6A conferences. The Lady Bulldogs took advantage of the new rule as they battled back from a seven-point deficit with four minutes to go and knotted the game at 47-all with 7.9 seconds left against the Chinle Lady Wildcats last Friday night. And although Chinle got the game winner from sophomore post Dizhoon White as time expired, longtime Winslow coach Jerron Jordan supported using the shot clock. “Traditionally, when you get the lead, the thing to do is pull the ball out,” he said. “Teams would try to kill some clock, but with the new rule, teams can’t stall early, so on the flip side, you don’t have to foul as quick.” With the shot clock in place, Winslow chipped away at that seven-point deficit and put pressure on the Lady Wildcats. “With the shot clock, we went on a little run to get back into the game,” Jordan said. “We had our chances, but kudos to Chinle. They made a big play down the stretch, and they got the ball to their post, and she did what she needed to do. “We had a defensive lapse on that final play,” he added. Still, the advent of the shot clock will not affect how teams play from the north, Chinle coach Francine McCurtain said. “We’ve had some discussions about it when we scrimmaged against Window Rock, and it didn’t seem to have affected us,” she said. “We all like to run and gun, and sometimes we have some trigger-happy kids who like to get one pass and shoot.” Nonetheless, McCurtain believes the shot clock will be a game-changer in tight games such as the one on Friday night. “I told the girls to run the clock, but we still had 45 seconds left, so we had to change our strategy,” she said. As the season continues, McCurtain said they need to design plays in situations like that. “I think it’s going to affect the way you play at the end of the game,” she said. “I know that Winslow had one violation, and they didn’t seem to be aware of how much time was left. “That is something we have to get used to, the Chinle coach said. I dont think its much of a concern until we actually experience it. We just gotta deal with it. In the boys contest, Chinle was whistled for one violation by not getting off a shot in time. “I was trying to make them run the clock,” Wildcat coach Raul Mendoza said of the club. “I think we were up by 20 (points), and we just forgot about the clock, so that’s why we got the violation.” Window Rock boys coach Gilbert Clauschee believes the shot clock will be glossed over, especially with how the rez teams like to play. “I don’t think it’s going to make a difference,” he said. “Most teams from the rez get into their offensive sets really quick, and we get our shots off before the 35 seconds.” Winslow boys coach Venton Nelson agreed. “Usually, we use up about 10 seconds before we start shooting the ball,” he said. “That’s how the reservation schools play. We love to go up and down the court, so it’s not going to bother us as much.” Like the rest of his counterparts, Nelson says the shot clock will likely influence the games outcome in a one-or two-possession contest. “As the season goes along and as we sharpen our skills, it’s going to be a factor,” he said. “The teams that are ahead will want to protect their lead, but they may forget about the shot clock.” The post AIA institutes 35-second shot clock for 3A to 6A basketball appeared first on Navajo Times.

[Category: Basketball]

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[l] at 11/23/22 3:17am
WINSLOW A slow start didn’t deter the Chinle boys basketball team. The Wildcats trailed 10-1 in the early going against the Winslow Bulldogs and head coach Raul Mendoza attributed that to his squads’ inexperience. Chinle finally got going at the tail end of the first quarter and in the second half they put up 38 points to score a 65-44 road win over the Bulldogs last Friday night. “This team is very young,” Mendoza said. “We got nine juniors and four seniors on the team, so basically most of our kids didn’t play varsity last year.” Of the 13 players on his squad, two got some varsity playing time one year ago with senior Delaney Bahe and Jostaiah Harvey being the veterans on the team. “We’re trying to get them to learn how to play together,” Mendoza said. “I think at times we looked good tonight, but we need to be a little more consistent. “It’s just recognizing situations,” he added. “A couple of times we didn’t recognize where a guy was open and instead of passing it to him, we tried to do something.” Identifying those situations will come with experience, Mendoza said. “It’s the little things and it comes with experience,” he said. “But I think we’ll be fine once we recognized those situations.” In perhaps it best quarter on the defensive end, the Wildcats held Winslow to four points in the second stanza as the Mendoza-coached team led 25-24 at the break. I love that, Mendoza said of the energy on the defensive end. That is how we want to play.” After taking a 20-16 lead in the opening quarter, Winslow coach Venton Nelson said his club lost its footing as they scored 24 points the rest of the way. “We came out ready to execute,” he said. “We did what we were supposed to do and I think it kind of shook them (the Wildcats). After that we just couldn’t find our rhythm again. “We got into foul trouble and we just couldn’t recoup from that,” he added. Nelson also lamented on the 30 turnovers they had, and felt that most of them were unforced. “You’re not going to win that many ballgames with 30 turnovers,” he said. “We just killed ourselves to where we couldn’t make a pass or we would make a stupid pass.” And while Chinle used its press to force the issue, the Winslow coach felt like his team were like a deer in headlight. “We didnt run our press breaker and weve been running that for the past two years, he said. We haven’t changed things, and so it’s the same thing we run. We just went blank and we beat ourselves.” Winslow was led by senior Brennan Begaye as he finished with nine points while senior Blaine Begay added eight. For Chinle, junior Jostaiah Harvey and senior Cashin White combined for 36 points with Harvey finishing with a game-high 19. Harvey put in 15 of those points in the second half while White scored 11 of his 17 points in the first quarter. “We were forcing things and coach told us to take a step back” Harvey said of the teams’ early woes. “We just had to play smart and let the game come to us.” The post Chinle boys overcome slow start appeared first on Navajo Times.

[Category: Basketball]

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[l] at 11/23/22 3:16am
FORT DEFIANCE The sharpshooting Page Lady Sand Devils nailed seven treys to improve its overall record to 2-0. Page got four treys from junior guard Alyssa Harris and two from senior Summer Begay on Saturday night as the Sand Devils outlasted Window Rock by a 52-47 count. I have to salute the veterans on the team, Page coach Celeste “Boka” Claw said of Harris and Begay. “They made some big shots, and they definitely executed. They know their roles on the team, and they executed throughout the entire night.” Harris led Page with 27 points, while Begay chipped in six. It took a while for the tandem to find their range as Page started the game cold, missing a bevy of shots. The Sand Devils trailed 15-7 after one quarter of play, with Harris accounting for four points. In the next stanza, Harris came up with eight points, which included a pair of three-point daggers as Page cut Window Rock’s lead down to 22-19 at the half. Behind Harris’ nine points, Page took a 34-33 cushion going into the fourth. “Alyssa played a fantastic game,” Claw said. “We was able to keep us afloat, especially with our bigs in foul trouble in the entire game. She knew what she needed to do, and her role was to be the leader, and she did that tonight.” And although she helped Page to a one-point advantage in the third quarter, Window Rock regained the lead at 37-34 with Shiryl Yazzie (8 points) and Jayme Tso (14 points) hitting back-to-back buckets with 6:02 left in regulation. For the next five-plus minutes, there were two ties and seven lead changes, with Page surging ahead at 49-47 when Begay hit her first of two treys with 49 seconds left. She added her next trey following a Page steal, which sealed the win for the Sand Devils. “This is our second game on the road, and we’re excited to get this win,” Claw said while adding that she was missing three players on Saturday night. “Once we get our team fully together, I think we’re gonna be definitely different,” she said. With some veterans on the team, Claw said they have high expectations as Page lost its opening round game last year to Chinle as the No. 5 seed in the 3A bracket. “I set the bar high for these young ladies,” the Page coach said. “I want them to be accountable, and if they continue to mature throughout the year, we’re gonna have a good outcome at the end of the year. It’s just a matter of them grinding and pushing themselves.” And although they started the 3A North Region at 1-0, Claw said the conference race is very volatile. “Our region so unpredictable,” she said. “We dont know who’s going to show up to play, and that is what I love about the 3A North. “Its always challenging to compete with all these teams,” she added. “Im glad that were back at it again.” The post Outside shooting lifts Page over Window Rock appeared first on Navajo Times.

[Category: Basketball]

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[l] at 11/23/22 3:15am
By Barbara Boxleitner Special to the Times GALLUP A chance to reconnect with a past coach was too good of an opportunity for Hailey Long to pass up. Courtesy photo | Colorado Northwestern Community College AthleticsFormer Gallup High standout Hailey Long is averaging 19.3 points and 9.8 rebounds per game for the Colorado Northwestern Community College women’s basketball team. Out of Gallup High School, she had basketball offers from colleges in multiple states, including Arizona and Washington. She ultimately decided to play for Colorado Northwestern Community College, where she has reunited with head coach Eric Benedick, who said he coached her in club ball from eighth to ninth grade. Their connection has resulted in immediate impact, for the 5-foot-10 forward was named the Scenic West Athletic Conference player of the week, according to the colleges online site. She was cited for 17 points and 12 rebounds against Northwest and 36 points and 13 rebounds against Central Wyoming. Shes a very talented individual that plays with a very high motor, Benedick said. She has a great knack for rebounding. Shes also very skilled off the bounce. Through four games (2-2), Long led Colorado Northwestern by averaging 19.3 points and 9.8 rebounds per game and shooting 55.3 percent from the field. Shes shown she was underestimated and undervalued coming out of high school, the coach said. Long fouled out in the opener, finishing with four points and two rebounds. Most of them (fouls) were defensive when I was trying to get the board, she said. She recovered from that debut to post three consecutive double-doubles in points and rebounds. She led players from both teams in scoring and rebounding during the win over Central Wyoming. My team was able to give me the ball quicker and at the right time, she said. I had so much energy and intensity and so much tenacity to go at the goal. She is able to score from the perimeter and near the basket. When Im open on the three, Ill most likely take the shot, she said. If the three-pointer isnt there, she will drive to the basket to score from the inside or draw a personal foul. She converted nine of 13 free throw attempts against Central Wyoming, topping all players with trips to the charity stripe. Benedick noted her growth from when he coached her years ago. Shes a high IQ player, he said. She went from somebody who was a little shy to shoot the ball to somebody who knows how to lead offensively. As far as ball control, Long learned how to position herself to collect rebounds without fouling opponents. Use my body to box them (foes) out. I would try to run to the basket and get in a good position, she said. If they were shooting in the paint, I would get closer to the goal. The team employs a man defense, so typically she is assigned to defend a bigger player. She is trying to improve her foot speed to stay with the guards when she has to defend them. Her length helps in covering ground, for she said, Im able to take bigger steps.” jQuery(document).ready(function() { jQuery(".post-meta p").text(function(index, text) { return text.replace('By Navajo Times |', ''); }); }); The post Lady Spartan reunites with middle school coach at CNCC appeared first on Navajo Times.

[Category: Basketball]

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[l] at 11/17/22 6:20am
Eleanor D. Wauneka Eleanor D. Wauneka TSE BONITO, N.M. — Funeral services for Eleanor Damon Wauneka, 91, of Window Rock, will be held Friday, Nov. 18, at 10 a.m., at the Community Bible Church in Tse Bonito, New Mexico, with Pastor Milton Shirleson officiating. Burial will follow at the Damon Cemetery in Fort Defiance. Eleanor was born March 9, 1931, in Wide Ruins, Arizona, into the Tábąąhá (Water’s Edge Clan). She was born for Hashtł’ishnii (Mud Clan). She passed away Nov. 9, 2022, in Albuquerque. Eleanor attended Riverside Indian School in Anadarko, Oklahoma, and graduated with the class of 1951. She continued her education at the Kiowa School of Practical Nursing in Lawton, Oklahoma, and received a diploma in practical nursing in 1952. In 1953, Eleanor started her career with the Fort Defiance Indian Hospital for 41 years, retiring on Jan. 3, 1995. She participated in many Christian church activities and enjoyed tending to her livestock and spending time with her family, especially her grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Eleanor is survived by her son, Garrett B. Wauneka; daughters, Judith A. Livingston and Elfina J. Wauneka; brother, Matthew R. Damon; sister, Rebecca Damon Mike; and seven grandchildren and five great-grandchildren. Eleanor is preceded in death by her parents, Monica L. Damon and George W. Damon; brothers, Daniel W. Damon Sr., Benjamin Damon and Melvin Damon; sister, Edith Damon Yazzie; and great-granddaughter, Morgan H. Livingston. Pallbearers will be Brandon V. Livingston, Brent Livingston, Tony Garcia IV, Jerrod Damon, Logan Damon, Cole Damon, Michaelson Yazzie, and Jeremiah A. Belone. Honorary pallbearers will be Garrett B. Wauneka, Craig R. Arviso, Kyle R. Arviso, Stenson Wauneka, Patrick Wauneka, Alfred Mike Sr., Daniel Damon Jr., Michael Yazzie, Matthew R. Damon, Sam Wauneka Jr., and Samson R. Arviso. A reception will take place at the Community Bible Church in Tse Bonito, New Mexico, following services at 12:30 p.m. Rollie Mortuary is in charge of arrangements. Jeffery S. Manning Jeffery S. Manning KIRTLAND, N.M. — Funeral services for Jeffery Steven Manning, 62, of Kirtland, New Mexico, will be held Friday, Nov. 18, at The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Chapel in Kirtland. Burial will follow in Durango, Colorado. Jeffery was born July 10, 1960, in Farmington. He passed away Nov. 12, 2022, in Denver, Colorado. Jeffery worked at Manning’s That’s-A-Burger, The Rock Storage, and Shiprock Powerwash. He enjoyed supporting his grandchildren in all their activities. Jeffery is survived by his wife, Tammie Tanner Manning; children, Amber Larkins, Amanda Moss, Markus Manning, and Jerrick Manning; mother, Verda Lavonne (Russell) Manning/Garner; siblings, James Manning, Jay Manning, and Paige Manning Mulford; and 11 grandchildren. Jeffery is preceded in death by his father, James Omer Manning. Farmington Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements. Irene L. Spencer GALLUP — Funeral services for Irene Lee Spencer, 84, of Red Rock, New Mexico, were held Nov. 15 at the Twin Buttes Church of Nazarene in Gallup, with Pastor Daniel Smiley officiating. Interment followed at the Rehoboth Mission Cemetery in Rehoboth, New Mexico. Irene was born April 15, 1938, in Red Rock, into the Kiyaa’áanii (Towering House Clan). She was born for Tódík’ózhí (Salt Water Clan). She passed away Nov. 15, 2022, in Gallup. Irene was a housewife and rancher who loved her children and enjoyed spending time working her livestock and visiting with family. Irene is survived by her sons, Speedy Spencer, Anthony Spencer Sr., and Mark Spencer; daughters, Priscilla Spencer, Loretta Spencer, and Maggie Brown-Egan; and 26 grandchildren and 16 great-grandchildren. Irene is preceded in death by her husband, Ben C. Spencer; son, Luke Spencer Sr.; parents, Annie and Tom Mix; and grandchildren, Luke Spencer Jr. and Brooke Spencer. BJ Spencer, Matthew Yazza, Luda Spencer, Bart Yazza, Aiden Harvey, and Tyler Spencer were pallbearers. Honorary pallbearers were Speedy Spencer, Anthony Spencer Sr., Loretta Spencer, Mark Spencer, Maggie Brown-Egan, and Priscilla Spencer. Rollie Mortuary was in charge of arrangements. Gerald Begay STEAMBOAT, Ariz. — Graveside service for Gerald Begay, 83, of Steamboat, Arizona, will be held today, Nov. 17, in Steamboat, at 10 a.m. Gerald, a traditional medicine man, was born June 21, 1939, in Ganado, Arizona, into the Honágháahnii (One-walks-around Clan). He was born for Tábąąhá (Water’s Edge Clan). He passed away Nov. 11, 2022, in Glendale, Arizona. Gerald is survived by his son, William Hubbard, and brothers, Steven Begay, Leonard Begay, and Chester Begay. Gerald is preceded in death by his parents, Mary Ann and Clayton Begay. Following service, a drive-thru reception will take place at the Begay’s residence in Steamboat. Summit Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements. Gregory L. Kayonnie CHINLE — The funeral services for Gregory Lane Kayonnie, 35, Wheatfields, Arizona, are pending. Gregory was born Feb. 23, 1987, in Chinle, into the Mąii Deeshgiizhinii (Coyote Pass Clan). He was born for Deeshchii’nii (Start of the Red Streak People Clan). He passed away Nov. 12, 2022, in Alaska. Gregory was employed in tiling/flooring and construction. Gregory is survived by his daughter, Riley James Kayonnie, and sister, Crystal Kayonnie. Gregory is preceded in death by Christine Kayonnie, Gary Kayonnie, and Daniella James. Silver Creek Mortuary is in charge of arrangements. The Navajo Times publishes obituaries free of charge as a public service. If you have an obituary you would like to submit, follow this link to the online submission form. We look forward to serving you. The post Obituaries for Nov. 17, 2022 appeared first on Navajo Times.

[Category: Obituaries]

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[l] at 11/17/22 3:31am
WINDOW ROCK The 24th Navajo Nation Council sputtered and whined before choosing who the interim speaker would be. Council Delegate Otto Tso was controversially elected on Wednesday to become interim speaker of the Council. Delegate Jamie Henio and Tso were chosen from a body of seven nominees. After they gave their speeches, delegates cast their ballots. After about 10 minutes, they split the votes, 11-11, with Delegate Amber Crotty not voting. Henio said he would step down as a candidate because he has elderly parents and livestock he needed to return to. “I respectfully have to say I’ll step back,” he said. Crotty chimed in and said she decided to vote and felt violated because the chief counsel was involved. She added she cast her vote but did not indicate who she voted for. Henio then added his comments and said he stepped back. “Let’s install vice chair Otto (Tso),” he said. Tso, who represents Tónaneesdizí, said the Council still has unfinished business they needed to complete before the incoming Council officially takes over in mid-January. “I am only here to finish out the remaining Council,” Tso said, who spoke only in Navajo. He added many of the delegates still had projects that were not yet completed. Tso will retain his seat and move onto the 25th Navajo Nation Council after defeating Angie Williams by an unofficial vote, 937 votes to 552 votes. The Law and Order Committee member recently got involved in a controversy when he put his name on legislation that would have placed Seth Damon on unpaid administrative leave. Damon, who ran unopposed and was reelected to represent Bááhááli, Chéch’iltah, Tsé łichíí, Rock Springs, Tsayatoh, and Kin’hózhóní, was caught in a compromising position during the Indian National Finals Rodeo which was held from Oct.18-22, in Las Vegas, Nevada. Damon admitted to being intoxicated. He was photographed at the South Point Casino and Resort. While he publicly went on record and gave a statement stating he went to the INFR on a “private vacation,” it was confirmed by the Navajo Times that Damon attended the Navajo Community Development Financial Institution as speaker of the Council, which was held at the Southpoint Casino. The photograph depicts Damon sitting at a slot machine, and he confirmed he was intoxicated when it was taken. The person who took the photo remains unknown. Damon authored the legislation Tso signed, which was nulled when Damon said he would resign as speaker of the Council. Henio, who represents Alamo, Ramah, and Tóhajiileehé, also spoke in Navajo. He reiterated what Tso said, saying the current Council body needed to prepare for a transition. “We will try and get the Council ready for the next Council,” Henio said. “We will get them ready. After that, it’ll be on them.” Henio lost his reelection bid to Norman M. Begay. Tso and Henio ran against Amber Crotty, Eugenia Charles-Newton, Daniel Tso, Carl Slater, and Edmund Yazzie. The post District 3 delegate assumes interim speaker appeared first on Navajo Times.

[Category: News]

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[l] at 11/17/22 3:30am
The Navajo people have spoken with their vote loud and clear. The first message is that the Navajo people were not pleased with their current tribal leadership in the Office of the President and the Navajo Nation Council. The hammer hit hard with the Navajo Nation Council, where the people voted in 2/3 (16) new Council delegates. Add to that change nine Council women and a woman vice president. With over 250,000 Navajos living off the reservation because of a lack of economic opportunities, it was a driving force in this election. The Navajo people want jobs so their children and grandchildren can live nearby and enjoy the Navajo Nation. Hundreds of Navajos move off the reservation each year to find jobs and housing. With over 6,000 businesses unable to physically locate on the reservation, many locate nearby in the border communities where it is easy to set up a business. With only 400 businesses registered with the Navajo Economic Development Office, many complained that the tribal red tape is too cumbersome to locate on Navajo. With the lack of broadband, the Navajo people were unhappy with the progress to better and improve communication. The lack of broadband and better communication impacted their schools, children, businesses, hospitals, and public safety. The pandemic has changed forever how communities and tribal governments communicate and move information. Then ARPA and CARE’s funding came along. The Navajo people saw the tribal lawmakers’ inability to make decisions and spend the funding to help the people with basic needs. After one year of trying, the spending slowly started with ARPA spending. By then, many Navajos had passed or moved off the reservation. The Navajo people saw a lack of leadership and demanded change firsthand. The Navajo people have appointed a new president and 16 new Council delegates. The task is to make life better for the 420,000 Navajo people on and off the reservation. The lawmakers should all be ashamed of an unemployment rate of 40 percent-plus in this time and age. The most important thing for elected officials is to listen to the people, or they will not vote you in next time around. Going forth, the chapters also need to spend their funding allocations by contracting projects out quickly because depending on tribal departments in Window Rock is too cumbersome. If chapter officials can’t do that, they will also feel the wrath of the voters. Here is the message loud and clear from this election. Give the Navajo people what they want and do it quickly. Give the people less government red tape, housing, roads, broadband, waterlines, powerlines, jobs, public safety, and good health care. Do that, and you will see another four years of service to the Navajo people. Marie Rose Shiprock Nez walked the walk I would like to thank President Nez and his administration for their excellent leadership and example over the past four years. I am not a member of the Navajo Nation (although I have a wife, six children, and 26 grandchildren who are). I have always appreciated the opportunity to live here. When President Nez took office in 2019, no one saw the monster pandemic coming. It was a challenge, both historic and unprecedented. The steady and consistent leadership pulled the Navajo Nation from a potential tragedy and disaster to a success story that was a model for others. Hard decisions were made that impacted the economy and educational process for sure. But thankfully, we can never know how many lives were saved and funerals avoided by making the hard choices. As a health and wellness educator in the Navajo Nation for over 40 years, I greatly appreciated the emphasis and modeling of physical activity, nutrition, and good health habits. President Nez was a strong voice and a great role model for our youth and all of us. He not only talked about it but walked the walk (or, more literally, ran) and led us by example. Finally, I appreciate that he was always civil and rational, never negatively conducting himself in public. A high level of integrity was maintained throughout the term. I commend President Nez and his administration for doing outstanding work over the past four years despite almost overwhelming challenges. We wish him and his family all the best in the future. We also recognize President Nygren and his wife as talented individuals and extend our best wishes to them. Ahxéhee’ ntsaago. Ollie Whaley Kayenta Housing in the Navajo Nation The housing for the Navajo Nation is a real issue. This issue is not only isolated to veterans, the elderly, or the homeless. Although they are among the population in need, the truth is that the availability of housing options is limited in the Navajo Nation. The limitation of housing is a combination of archeology studies, environmental protection issues, excavation issues, grazing rights, homesite leasing, neighbor approvals, right of way disputes, lack of roads, and access to infrastructure needs like water, sewer, and electricity, even after each of these obstacles are overcome it does not address the bigger issue. The root of the problem is the control of the property. Who wants to invest in a home that has no transactional value? It’s interesting that on the reservation, we have land disputes over land that very few own. Realistically we count on a system that depends on a section 8 program facilitator called NHA (Navajo Housing Authority) to provide all the housing for the Nation. The Navajo Nation population is about 48% under the poverty level – roughly 52% are above the poverty level, which is more than half of our population living on the Navajo Reservation. According to these numbers, why do we rely on the government to develop homes for the individuals who can afford to build their homes or pay for accumulative equity dwellings? In today’s everyday cities, the neighborhoods are divided by income class anytime you enter a metropolitan area. In the Navajo Nation, we have a bigger problem, and it’s not income, land disputes, relocation, or trust specifications only. It’s the availability of land to build on, allocated assigned land. We are divided by grazing permittee holders that claim to have rights to the land because of animal grazing. In reality, most grazing permittees do not have any animals, or fewer than half are needed for their allotted permits. They do have control over a vast part of the Navajo Nation. These individuals in the past have held many of the growing communities from progress. Local communities are discouraged by just a few people in the local areas in local economic development. This is also the same group keeping other Navajo members from moving back to the land set aside for these enrolled members of the Navajo Nation. This is a painful conversation, but if we lose our Navajo population, we lose grant funding for our students, subsidies for our elderly and disabled, and certain rights like water rights. Discovering the problem is easy, but discovering a solution is finding hope for our people. A solution would be for the tribe to invest in a business with a formation of a section 17 company, a community development corporation (CDC), or a for-profit or non-profit corporation of a group of LGA-certified chapters. If the chapters were to create apartments or a series of sub-division style lots funded, for example, by the low-income housing tax credit and run it like a mobile park, and create revenue for taxes and place triple wide trailers on the lot; to look like homes, and possibly create income from mobile home sales from funding sources like HUD section 184, FHA, or traditional financing for the residing individuals, this would remove right of way issues for roads, homesite lease issues like neighboring residence’s signatures, and have a controlled environment for infrastructures like running water and electricity, and the chapters can create local ordinances regarding operation and eviction. Because the Navajo Nation currently has no eviction laws. This is but one way to create an opportunity for our people to avoid the calamity and devastation of a COVID-19 event to eliminate a household when multi-generational individuals live in one house. Neal Riggs Leupp, Ariz. The post Letters | Hammer hit hard appeared first on Navajo Times.

[Category: Letters]

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[l] at 11/17/22 3:30am
By Donovan Quintero and Krista Allen Navajo Times WINDOW ROCK Every Vietnam veteran has a missing puzzle, said Tommy Moore, who found his at the Hilton Garden Inn hotel in Gallup Oct. 13. “Mine was Gary,” said Moore, who served in the U.S. Army from 1969-71, when he met Gary Denke of Belmont, South Dakota. At the time, Moore was 21, and Denke was 19. “He was the missing puzzle that I’ve been looking for,” said Moore, 74. “I’m proud to be a veteran, and I don’t care what people say about us. I’m proud to be who I am––alive, and I have my children.” Moore said when his children were growing up, they would ask him if he had any true friends when he was younger. “I said, ‘Yeah, I did. His name is Gary Denke,’” Moore said. “And they remember. When he called, and when they met him, they said, ‘You’re the guy that our dad talks about.’” When Moore was discharged from the Army in 1971, he lost touch with Denke, 72, who recently looked him up online and found his contact. Denke said he took a chance and called the number he found; sure enough, it was Moore’s number. The old friends reunited, alongside their families, in October. Denke traveled with his wife, Suzan Denke, from the Mount Rushmore state to meet again. “It was emotional,” Denke told the Navajo Times. “It was really a good thing, and it’s something that I had looked forward to for quite some time. And I often thought about Tommy and our friendship.” Finding Moore Navajo Times | Donovan QuinteroVietnam veteran Tommy Moore, right, holds a photo of himself and his friend Gary Denke that was taken while serving in the Vietnam War. “It was just a wonderful thing, to be honest,” Denke said. “We were in Advanced Individual Training in Fort Ord, California, (in 1969) and in Vietnam––it was very fulfilling for me to reunite with my friend after 52 years.” Moore said they still ask each other how they actually met. “Maybe we sat down and said, ‘Hey, pass me the salt.’ Maybe that’s how we met,” Moore said. “I have no clue, and he (Denke) doesn’t have a clue. But we became friends, and we got so close and we both got orders to go to Vietnam. “We took different flights out there to Vietnam; they split us up,” he remembers. “We got to Vietnam.” Denke was with the 525th Transportation, and Moore was with the 10th Transportation. “On our day off somewhere, we found each other,” Moore said. “Every day off, I (went) to his company and inquired about him. He did the same thing, and that’s how we hung out together.” Salt and Pepper, that’s what their comrades called them in Vietnam. Denke said he doesnt know why those names were given to them; perhaps Moore is Diné and Denke is Bilagáana. Denke said he didn’t always look for Moore over the years but made a complete effort until around August 2022. “I simply took a chance on Tommy Moore from Gallup, New Mexico, online, and I thought, ‘Well, this matches the Tommy Moore that I knew,’” Denke explained. “I said, ‘That’s got to be the Tommy that I once knew, and I’m pretty sure of it.’ So, I called the number and their daughter, Prentiss, answered. “As I spoke to Prentiss––apparently, Tommy overheard some of it, and he said he wanted to talk,” he said. “So, that’s how we made a connection. But I had not pursued my idea of reuniting with Tommy until then.” Denke’s wife, Suzan, said they don’t use social media or the internet. “So, for Gary to get online and try to find somebody, that was kind of unusual because we don’t do any of that stuff because of our age,” she said. “We just didn’t grow up using social media. So, for him, it was kind of an extraordinary step to try to find somebody on the computer. That’s not something we’ve done before––with anyone.” Denke said he spoke with Prentiss for a while, and he’s thankful the 18-year-old didn’t hang up. He said the conversation was long enough to where Moore overheard his name. Denke said speaking to Moore after 52 years was like talking to him only a week ago. He noted that the element of time brought time close together. “Hearing his voice, I knew immediately that that’s the Tommy Moore that I knew in Vietnam,” Denke said. “It just brought that time frame closer.” Moore said when he was discharged from the military, he rodeoed and traveled across the country to compete and often stopped in Texas because he thought Denke lived in the Lone Star state. “My brother, that’s what I called him,” Moore said. “Throughout the years––this is when technology started coming up with the internet, which made it easier, but I still couldn’t find him. “He was doing the same thing to find out where I was,” he said. “Somewhere on his part––that place, western New Mexico, there’s a town; he scoped in and saw Gallup. What he did was find my landline, and he found me.” Experiencing Navajo capital Denke, Suzan, and Moore’s family spent time together and visited local attractions, such as the Navajo Nation Veterans Memorial Park, and stopped by the flea markets. Denke and his wife said they learned about the Diné culture and traditions, and experiencing the Navajo capital was fascinating. “This is a friend of mine from a while back,” Moore said. “Fifty-two years is a long time, and we were both young. What can I say? The emotions were there, and he found me.” He remembers sitting on the porch three months ago, hearing the phone ring, which Prentiss answered that day, and it was Denke. “I said, ‘Give me the phone.’ We just broke down over the phone because it was so emotional,” Moore said. “After that, we kept calling each other biweekly, and we kept in touch with each other. Somewhere he made up his mind … to come see (me). That’s how we met up. It was a blessing in disguise. “It was really an honor just to see my brother again,” Moore said. “This isn’t the end.” jQuery(document).ready(function() { jQuery(".post-meta p").text(function(index, text) { return text.replace('By Navajo Times |', ''); }); }); The post Salt and Pepper reunite at Hilton Garden appeared first on Navajo Times.

[Category: People]

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[l] at 11/17/22 3:29am
Jack Ahasteens toon for Nov. 17, 2022. Select a thumbnail below to launch a gallery of Jacks recent work: The post Comics by Jack Ahasteen appeared first on Navajo Times.

[Category: Comics, comics, Jack Ahasteen]

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[l] at 11/17/22 3:29am
GALLUP The war fused their friendship, and the spirit of brotherhood began. It was 1969, and Tommy Moore was 21. Gary Denke, whom he had yet to call his brother, was 19. When their names were being called out to find out where to serve their military duties, he heard Denke’s name called out, and they told him he was heading off to Vietnam. “I said, ‘It’s OK, buddy.’ A few minutes later, they called me,” Moore said on Oct. 13, in Gallup. “And we ended up in Vietnam together.” Both shipped out to Vietnam, and Richard Nixon became president. Nixon had promised he’d de-escalate the war by pursuing a withdrawal policy. But for the two boys, one from the Navajo Nation and the other from South Dakota, their contribution to the war was about to start. First conversation Moore said they were split up when they arrived in Vietnam. “And every chance we could get, we would come back together and hang out together,” Moore remembered as he and Gary stood with their arms around one another. After their enlistment ended, the two left and returned to their homes. Moore said he returned to the reservation life and frybread, beans, and mutton. He later got into rodeo and traveled throughout Texas, participating in rodeo events in the 1970s and 1980s. Thinking Denke was from Texas, Moore said he’d often sift through phone directories’ D section. But no luck. Moore had no idea that Denke was doing the same thing and was searching for him too. Despite never sharing his stories about his time in the Army, Moore said his kids often asked him if he had friends. He said he made many friends, but there was one, in particular, he said that he considered a brother. “They asked, ‘What’s his name?’ I said, ‘Gary Denke,’” Moore said his reply was to his children. Denke was the one who found Moore. “He was the one that hunted me down,” Moore said of Denke. Their first conversation over the phone almost never happened. “And the first time we talked, my daughter, she almost hung up. I heard it. I asked her, ‘Sweetheart, who is it?’ It’s the house phone. She goes, ‘I don’t know, dad.’ Then I heard ‘Gary Denke.’ And I said, ‘Woah, woah, give it to me,’” Moore said as he and Denke laughed. “That’s how we got started.” Perfect bond Navajo Times | Donovan QuinteroVietnam veterans Tommy Moore, right, and Gary Denke, laugh at a photo of them that was taken while serving in the Vietnam War during their reunion on Oct. 13 in Gallup. The two reunited at the Hilton Garden Inn. The hotel paid for Denke and his wife Suzan Denke’s stay. Moore said he is reuniting with his brother after not seeing him since 1970 began making him anxious. “It’s been a long time coming to me. I’m just sitting there and getting all nervous and everything,” Moore recollected. Denke quickly reassured him and said he was the guy he had met five decades before. “I’m just the same old ordinary guy that I always was,” Denke said. For Denke, his memory of Moore was not about what they did in the war but about how he dressed. “When we were in our civilian clothes, the way I remember it, Tommy normally wore a cowboy hat, and he dressed western,” Denke said. Being a guitarist himself, Denke said he also found out Moore played. “Somehow, I found out that he played the guitar and sang. And that we were doing the same thing at the same time in the military. And so that’s how I remember him,” Denke said. Their commonalities helped bond their friendship deeper. “I got attached to him (Gary), and I think the spirit of brotherhood begun is in Vietnam, of all places,” Moore said. Like most wartime veterans, Moore said he’s had his share of post-traumatic stress disorder and battling those demons from time to time. Because of his experiences, he kept to himself. But to see his buddy again. “In the back of my mind, I think this is very important. I look at my life; I’ve been through so much. Sometimes PTSD will get to me a little bit. But there’s always a missing piece of the puzzle,” Moore said. Rekindling memories The pair sat at a table in the hotel. Both brought boxes of photos, and Moore brought his uniform, which Denke helped Moore’s wife, Laverne Moore, understand what each patch meant and signified. One photo, in particular, a black-and-white photo of Moore, was special to Denke because of a message Moore wrote on the back of it. “Gary, A best buddy in Viet -Nam. Always a friend. God bless you. Fr. Tommy Moore,” the message read. At the bottom of the message and barely visible, it read, “Shi – boy.” When Moore’s wife read it, she became emotional because she realized what her husband had been talking about when he spoke of Denke. For Moore, reuniting with Denke was the puzzle he’d been missing for many years. “And I love him,” said Moore, who became emotional. Moore turned to his wife and said she knew how tough it was to be married to a veteran. “But she deals with it. She takes me places; she takes care of me,” Moore said of his wife. Denke is home now, and Moore is too, but the two plan to stay in touch from now on. Moore doesn’t plan on rehashing their time in the war. They want to focus on being happy now, said Moore. Moore is Kiyaa’áanii and born for Bilagáana. His maternal grandfather is Tsi’naajinii, and his paternal grandfather is Bilagáana. The post After 52 years, Vietnam veterans reunite appeared first on Navajo Times.

[Category: People]

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[l] at 11/17/22 3:28am
Page Police Department October 1 Tashina Graymountain, Page — Criminal Damage, Domestic Violence. Arrest Made. Perry Joe, Page — Failure to Appear. Custody Arrest. October 3 Cole Johnson, Cameron, Arizona — Domestic Violence, Assault, Simple. Arrest Made. Elroy Yazzie, Page — Disorderly Conduct. Custody Arrest. Brandon Dodson, Page — Domestic Violence, Assault, Simple. Arrest Made. Nanitta Nez, Page — Domestic Violence, Assault, Simple. Arrest Made. Dellexio Bahe, Page — Failure to Pay Fine. Custody Arrest. October 4 Thomas Kendall, Page — Trespassing, Alcohol Offense. Cite/Summons Request. Damian Begay, Page — Domestic Violence, Disorderly Conduct, Assault, Simple. Arrest Made. Brooks Begay, Page — Domestic Violence, Endangerment, Traffic Offense. Arrest Made. Cite/Summons Request. October 5 Tyson Begay, Tonalea, Arizona — Theft, Prop, Shoplifting, Alcohol Offense. Custody Arrest. October 6 Terrill Nez, Page — Failure to Appear, Alcohol Offense, Theft, Prop, Shoplifting. Custody Arrest. October 7 Julia Chapman, Page — Domestic Violence, Disorderly Conduct, Assault, Simple. Arrest Made. October 9 Truman Orona, Page — Failure to Pay Fine. Custody Arrest. Michael Bigcrow, Page — Domestic Violence, Assault, Simple. Arrest Made. Cite/Summons Request. October 10 Willis Navaho, Page — Disorderly Conduct. Custody Arrest. Dellynn Wilson, Kayenta — Theft, Prop, Shoplifting, Failure to Appear. Custody Arrest. October 11 Justin Begaye, Kaibeto, Arizona — Failure to Appear, Theft, Prop, Shoplifting. Custody Arrest. Eric Metcalf, Sioux Falls, South Dakota — Failure to Pay Fine. Custody Arrest. Christopher Harris, Lorain, Ohio — Theft, Prop, Control Substance, Possession, Other. Custody Arrest. John Tiefenthaler, Show Low, Arizona — DUI Alcohol or Drugs, Endangerment, Manslaughter. Cite and Release. Charles Slick, Shonto, Arizona — Failure to Appear. Custody Arrest. October 12 Bryson Billah, Kaibeto, Arizona — Disorderly Conduct, Assault, No Weapon, Aggravated Injury. Cite/Summons Request. Ryne Aguero, Kaibeto, Arizona — Disorderly Conduct, Assault, Aggravation with Other Weapon, Theft, Prop, Shoplifting. Cite/Summons Request. Chester Yellowman, Kaibeto, Arizona — Probation or Parole Violation. Custody Arrest. Marylena Yellowhair, Page — Disorderly Conduct. Custody Arrest. October 13 Cory Nez, Marble Canyon, Arizona — Failure to Pay Fine, Failure to Appear. Custody Arrest. Tyrone Redshirt, Tonalea, Arizona — Disorderly Conduct, Obstructing Justice. Custody Arrest. Orlando Lee, Page — Disorderly Conduct, Resisting Interfering with Police, Aggravation with Other Weapon, Assault, Police, Simple. Custody Arrest. Kyle Quimque, Page — Theft, Prop, Shoplifting. Cite and Release. Annstell Coolie, Kayenta — Warrant Arrest. Custody Arrest. October 14 Shandon Anderson, Page — Disorderly Conduct, Domestic Violence, Assault, Simple. Arrest Made. Scott Harris, Page — City Code Violation. Cite/Summons Request. Michael Natonabah, Page — City Code Violation. Cite and Release. Pedro Welch, Page — Theft, Prop, Shoplifting. Cite and Release. Celena Manygoats, Kaibeto, Arizona — Theft, Prop, Shoplifting, Failure to Pay Fine, Failure to Appear. Custody Arrest. Jim Nelson, Page — Traffic Offense. Cite and Release. October 15 Yvonne Zee, Kaibeto, Arizona — Assault, Aggravation with Other Weapon, Domestic Violence. Arrest Made. Tristan Nez, Page — Theft, Prop, Shoplifting. Cite/Summons Request. Monique Desmond, Tonalea, Arizona — Assault, Aggravation with Other Weapon. Felony Charging Rece. Francis Whitehat, Page — Theft, Prop, Shoplifting, False Information Report, Traffic Offense. Custody Arrest. Scott Harris, Page — City Code Violation. Cite/Summons Request. October 16 Amerae Baeza, Phoenix — Control Substance, Possession, Synthetic, Sale/MFG. Custody Arrest. Angelo Estrada, Phoenix — Control Substance, Possession, Synthetic, Sale/MFG. Custody Arrest. October 17 Raymond Boone, Kayenta — Criminal Nuisance, Disorderly Conduct. Cite/Summons Request. October 18 Adolph June, Kaibeto, Arizona — Failure to Comply with Court Order, Failure to Appear. Custody Arrest. Terrill Nez, Page — Failure to Appear, Alcohol Offense, Theft, Prop, Shoplifting. Custody Arrest. Tyson Begay, Tonalea, Arizona — Theft, Prop, Shoplifting, Alcohol Offense. Custody Arrest. Shaun Kee, Page — Assault with a Knife, Disorderly Conduct. Custody Arrest. Thomas Kendall, Page — Trespassing, Alcohol Offense. Custody Arrest. Bryant Young, Page — Theft, Prop, Shoplifting. Custody Arrest. Peter Diaz, Page — Control Substance, Possession, Paraphernalia, Probation or Parole Violation, Failure to Appear. Custody Arrest. Monica Chee, Page — Traffic Offense, Failure to Comply with Court Order, Failure to Appear, Failure to Pay Fine. Custody Arrest. October 19 Brandon Saliego, Page — City Code Violation. Cite and Release. Veronica Wagner, Page — Theft, Prop, Shoplifting. Cite and Release. Lanshawn Begay, Piñon, Arizona — Disorderly Conduct, Resisting Interfering with Police, Failure to Appear. Custody Arrest. October 20 Shelby Yellowman, Page — Trespassing. Custody Arrest. Orlando Lee, Page — Disorderly Conduct, Resisting Interfering with Police, Aggravation with Other Weapon, Assault, Police, Simple. Custody Arrest. Raymond Boone, Kayenta — Criminal Nuisance, Disorderly Conduct. Custody Arrest. Belinda Ayze, Tonalea, Arizona — Disorderly Conduct, Failure to Appear. Custody Arrest. Newton Charlie, The Gap, Arizona — Disorderly Conduct, Obstructing Justice, Failure to Comply with Court Order. Custody Arrest. Byron Frank, Flagstaff — Alcohol Offense. Custody Arrest. Terrill Nez, Page — Failure to Appear, Alcohol Offense, Theft, Prop, Shoplifting. Custody Arrest. Mackell Reddye, Kayenta — Theft, Prop, Shoplifting. Cite and Release. Sherilynn Reddye, Kayenta — Theft, Prop, Shoplifting. Cite and Release. Scott Harris, Page — City Code Violation. Cite/Summons Request. October 21 Joshua Smith, Kayenta — DUI Alcohol or Drugs, Traffic Offense. Custody Arrest. Aaron James, Phoenix — Trespassing. Custody Arrest. Sharon Reddye, Kayenta — Theft, Prop, Shoplifting. Cite and Release. Ryne Aguero, Kaibeto, Arizona — Disorderly Conduct, Assault, Aggravation with Other Weapon, Theft, Prop, Shoplifting. Cite and Release. October 23 Adrian Nez, Page — DUI Alcohol or Drugs, Traffic Offense. Cite and Release. Oliver Leffew, Page — Criminal Damage, Domestic Violence, Disorderly Conduct. Cite/Summons Request. Arrest Made. Austin Begay, Page — Domestic Violence, Assault, Simple. Arrest Made. October 24 Erwin Fowler, Kaibeto, Arizona — Trespassing. Custody Arrest. Robert Nelson, Page — Assault, Police, Simple. Custody Arrest. Jeremy Hudson, Page — Criminal Nuisance. Custody Arrest. October 25 Orin Yellowman, Page — DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Cite and Release. Jose Gamez, Page — Disorderly Conduct. Custody Arrest. Rendell Bennett, Page — DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Custody Arrest. Joseph Smith, Kayenta — DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Custody Arrest. Byron Grebb, Tuba City — Failure to Comply with Court Order. Custody Arrest. Cole Johnson, Cameron, Arizona — Domestic Violence, Assault, Simple. Cite/Summons Request. Arrest Made. October 26 Kynecia Dixon, Page — DUI Alcohol or Drugs. Cite and Release. Kimberly Lewis, Page — Alcohol Offense. Cite and Release. Anderson Lane, Tuba City — Theft, Prop, Other. Custody Arrest. Stephen Trull, Page — Probation or Parole Violation. Custody Arrest. October 27 Derek Ligon, Page — Disorderly Conduct. Cite and Release. John Sanders, Kirkland, Washington — Disorderly Conduct. Cite/Summons Request. Erwin Riggs, Page — Disorderly Conduct. Custody Arrest. Andrea Yazzie, Page — Theft, Prop, Shoplifting. Cite and Release. Sampson Walters, Tonalea, Arizona — Criminal Damage. Cite/Summons Request. October 28 Timothy Anderson, Kayenta — Disorderly Conduct. Custody Arrest. Austin Lopez, Tonalea, Arizona — Alcohol Offense. Cite and Release. David Brown, Chinle — DUI Alcohol or Drugs, Failure to Comply with Court Order. Custody Arrest. October 29 Janelle Dickson, LeChee, Arizona — Theft, Prop, Shoplifting. Cite and Release. Davphine Begay, Cameron, Arizona — Theft, Prop, Shoplifting. Cite and Release. October 30 Dane Kocjan, Page — Fraud. Custody Arrest. Sheldon Nez, Page — Disorderly Conduct. Custody Arrest. October 31 Justin Begaye, Kaibeto, Arizona — Failure to Appear, Theft, Prop, Shoplifting. Custody Arrest. Dewayne Manson, Page — Criminal Nuisance, Disorderly Conduct, Trespassing, Failure to Comply with Court Order. Custody Arrest. The post Police Blotter for Nov. 17, 2022 appeared first on Navajo Times.

[Category: Police Blotter]

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[l] at 11/17/22 3:22am
By Geri Hongeva Special to the Times FLAGSTAFF On Saturday morning, Nov. 5, 2022, the Mt. Soledad National Veterans Memorial in San Diego, California, conducted a dedication ceremony to add a Navajo Code Talkers plaque to its wall. Over 150 people were in attendance which was also livestreamed across the country. Special to the Times | Geri HongevaThe family of the late Sgt. Johnny R. Manuelito Sr., a World War II Navajo Code Talker. Leanna Manuelito-Mojado and Dolly Manuelito hold their fathers photo stand for a photograph with Marines bulldog mascot named “Manny and his Marine handler. Mt. Soledad is located 822 feet up a hillside with a gorgeous view all around the San Diego Bay, a panoramic view in four directions. This park was founded in April 1952, and at the highest point stands a 29-foot concrete white cross with a footing base of 14 feet. The memorial holds over 5,500 plaques of men and women who have served in the armed forces, past and present. Two Navajo Code Talkers Museum board members were in attendance on this special day, Geraldine Hongeva and a descendant of one of the Navajo Code Talkers, the son of the late Roy Hawthorne Sr., World War II Navajo Code Talker from Lupton, Arizona, Regan Hawthorne, U.S. Army veteran attended the event with his family. Manuelito’s family The family of the late Sgt. Johnny R. Manuelito Sr., one of the original 29 WWII Navajo Code Talkers, also arrived, including daughters Leanna Manuelito-Mojado, Dolly Manuelito and granddaughter Tara Frank attended. Each daughter held a framed photograph of their father. They traveled from Bishop, California, from the Paiute Tribe, where they were born and raised. He helped develop the code and was one of the instructors to teach the code to the new Navajo Marines who arrived for training. Both Dolly and Leanna primarily grew up in Bishop, but they remember visiting their father’s family in Sheep Springs, New Mexico, when they were younger. They still visit the paternal side of the family in the Navajo Nation. Manuelito had seven children, 18 grandchildren, and 27 great-grandchildren. On April 1, 1968, Manuelito died. His family didn’t know what a vital role he played as a Navajo Code Talker until 2001 when they were presented with the Congressional Gold Medal for their father’s service. Honoring code talkers Mt. Soledad Memorial Association wanted to honor the Navajo Code Talkers in November for Native American Heritage Month. Since they are a part of the local San Diego history, the original 29 Navajo Code Talkers were sent for training to the Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego, then onto Camp Elliot, where they developed the code. “The Navajo Code Talkers that we honor today were the original Americans that fought for their nation at a time when they were still not deemed citizens of the United States, nor even allowed the freedom to vote,” said retired Maj. Phil Kendro, who served more than 20 years in the U.S. Marines as a pilot and instructor. Kendro is the president and CEO of Mt. Soledad Memorial Association. “However, due to their strong work, persistence, and dedicated warrior ethos, those stories will not be forgotten,” he said. Top-secret mission Courtesy photoRetired Marine Sgt. Major Neil OConnell, retired Marine Maj. Phil Kendro, and U.S. Army veteran Regan Hawthorne, Diné, pose for the camera. At the end of August 1942, when the young Navajo Marines were shipped off, they joined the battle in the Pacific Theater, where they used their sacred language in World War II to defeat Japan. “This language, that was manipulated in such a way as to refer to a reconnaissance helicopter as a hummingbird. This language, that was manipulated so it could change the sacred teachings of the upbringing, to an instrument to bring to an end of death and destruction of war,” Regan Hawthorne explained. “Today, we enshrine 400 of our warriors who stood in defense of the homeland. That is why these Navajo teenagers went to war; it was their homeland,” Hawthorne added. “In 1942, there was no Navajo Nation flag, but in 1942, there was a threat to this flag (U.S.). It was these soldiers that now stand under this flag, that defended that and raised it higher, so all the world can see that we are America.” Keynote speaker Brig. Gen. James A. Ryans, Assistant Commanding General, 1st Marine Division, explained how the military began using Native Americans who were fluent in their language to help communicate starting in World War I. But it was the Marines who fully embraced the idea. Marine Staff Sgt. Philip Johnston came up with the idea to use the Navajo language and recruit Navajo teenagers to help with communication that the enemy did not understand since (Navajo) was not a written language. “This first platoon of Navajo men successfully completed boot camp as the highest performing platoon out of all the platoons within the company at the time,” Ryans said. “Following their graduation from recruit training, the new Navajo Marines were sent to communication school, where they learned the fundamentals of operating military radio. “Then, after graduating from communication school, they were transported back to San Diego and informed of their top-secret mission,” he said. The Navajo Marines were flawless in the test of combat using the double code. The Navajo code was a success, and the enemy could not break it, added Ryans. A special appearance by the Marines bulldog mascot named “Manny,” who is named after Manuelito, who helped develop the Navajo code. He then became an instructor to teach other code talkers. After the ceremony Nov. 5, Manny the bulldog posed for photographs with the Manuelito family. San Diego Mayor Todd Gloria and U.S. Army Spc were special guests in attendance, 4th Class, John P. Baca (Medal of Honor recipient), and the Marine Corps Band – San Diego. Posting of the colors was done by the 1st Marine Division – Camp Pendleton. jQuery(document).ready(function() { jQuery(".post-meta p").text(function(index, text) { return text.replace('By Navajo Times |', ''); }); }); The post Navajo Code Talker plaque dedicated in San Diego appeared first on Navajo Times.

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