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[l] at 7/16/19 3:46pm

WINDOW ROCK

Fire personnel and Navajo police made a gruesome discovery after putting a car fire out on early Monday morning near Church Rock, New Mexico.

The FBI said a body was found in the trunk of a car believed to be a Dodge Avenger SXT off Pipe Line Road, which is located off New Mexico State Road 566, about 14 miles northeast of Gallup. The car was found burning in a ditch. After the fire was extinguished, fire personnel discovered a badly burned body in the trunk of the car.

The FBI did not say if the body was a male of female, but said the body was taken to the state Office of the Medical Investigator for determination of cause of death and identification.

Anyone with information about the incident or who recalls seeing anything suspicious happening prior to the fire on Monday morning between the hours of 6 and 7a.m. is asked to call the FBI at 505-889-1300, or go to https://tips.fbi.gov and leave a tip.

 


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[Category: News]

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[l] at 7/15/19 12:12pm

The post PHOTO: Navajo Nation Council delegates start summer session appeared first on Navajo Times.

[Category: Politics]

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[l] at 7/11/19 9:57am

In Washington, we have a Twitter president who ceaselessly taps notes to his millions of followers.

On the Navajo Nation, we have a photo-op prez who seeks and finds any opportunity to pose for photos.

Duane Beyal portrait

Duane A. Beyal

While Donald Trump surprises, confounds, outrages and leaves many wondering what he meant, Jonathan Nez appears all over the place, from Window Rock to Tuba City to Washington, posing in photographs.

This is partially a result of new communications systems that have taken root on Navajo in only the past few years. Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram and others sound like the flavors of candy in a child’s Halloween bag.

But the new social systems are embraced by Trump who uses them to sally forth with his commentary, thoughts and ideas – no matter how outlandish or bizarre.

No doubt Trump enjoys his direct contact with his followers. All you have to do is click your phone a few times and there he is.

This new tactic is also a way for him to avoid coverage by the news media, which he has branded “fake news.”

How great is it that an authoritarian leader with no scruples or common sense can have a direct way to communicate with the masses? What would Hitler or historical emperors have done with such a tool? The possibilities are endless.

Now comes Nez with his effort to bypass the news media, the Navajo Nation Council and any person who has any business with Window Rock, appearing in at least 10 photos a day in what he calls “transparency.”

“Transparency” is one of those vague words that have become vogue with government officials and their observers. It should mean that the business of government is the people’s business. We all have a right to know what our governments are doing.

In reality, “transparency” is whatever a particular official wants it to mean. With Trump, he can say he is only giving the truth to his followers, whereas the Washington Post is keeping track of the lies he has told and continues to tell, a figure up into the thousands.

With Nez, as my reporters will tell you, his transparency means none at all – questions about any issue are brushed aside, ignored or promises are made to provide answers but not kept.
As some delegates on the Navajo Nation Council have said, where is the Nez-Lizer Administration and why aren’t they working with us? All they’re doing is posing for photos on social media, they have said in stories we have published.

Along with the photo ops, Nez and company appear at ribbon-cuttings, grand openings, dedications and sign bills after they are passed by the Council.

This is an attempt to take credit for the years – sometimes decades – of work done by residents, employees and past leaders. Signing documents for another photo op also takes credit away from the workers and Council committees that hammered out the details.

Among the daily messages from Trump, he always makes gaffes such as saying the patriot army “took over the airports” during the Revolutionary War – when airports didn’t exist.

In a similar vein, Nez always takes the chance to repeat the phrase “Buy Navajo,” which leads a reasonable person to ask, “Where? Where are the stores like those in the border towns and faraway cities?”

At the 4th of July celebration in Window Rock, my staff who were covering the events say Nez kept elbowing his way into photo poses. In the past, his entourage followed my reporter and photographer from event to event, trying to edge into photos at every opportunity.

Another of my reporters pointed out that Nez was offended when she asked an off-topic question. This kind of question is one that does not follow the reason an official called the meeting. And they are usually questions the official is caught off guard by and to which the official may not know the answer.

“What happened to his open door policy?” this reporter asked.

Meanwhile, people who travel to Window Rock to do business usually find no one home or staff who do not know anything and must search for answers.

This type of “transparency” is not serving the Navajo people or the interests of the Navajo Nation.

Like Trump who appears on Twitter with a moment’s notice to express whatever is on his mind to his millions of followers, Nez is beginning to look like a cardboard cutout of a figure with his hand held out ready for a handshake.

For our readers, for the Navajo people, we say no to the photo-op prez and yes to a real working president.


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[Category: Opinion]

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[l] at 7/11/19 8:12am

WINDOW ROCK

Law and Order Committee Chair Eugenia Charles-Newton wanted answers from Director of Public Safety Jesse Delmar and Chief of Police Phillip Francisco during her committee’s meeting Monday.

The ensuing exchange resulted in Francisco laying his badge on the table and walking out.

Francisco, unaware of exactly what he was supposed to present, gave a brief overview of what his department has been up to thus far.

Delmar did not attend the meeting due to a conflict in scheduling, but had Dale West, director of Criminal Investigations, go in his place.

After Francisco was finished Charles-Newton told him and West exactly what she wanted to talk about: an email exchange between herself and Delmar about a recent criminal case and its handling.

“This is to discuss the back-and-forth emails that got out of hand,” said Charles-Newton, who asked Francisco if he would like to go into executive session before furthering the discussion (Francisco declined).

She said Delmar was asked three basic questions.

Since it’s a criminal case details weren’t specifically stated when Charles-Newton asked the questions, which were: Why was the person released? How are we addressing dispatch? And What is the process of basic communication protocol?

After a further heated exchange between the delegates and Francisco, the police chief said, “Here you go,” taking off his badge and placing it on the table. “I’m done … Good luck finding someone who can do a better job.”

Following the meeting, Francisco made it clear he has not resigned from his post. He said he had no intention of quitting, but grew tired of not being given the opportunity to finish answering questions posed to him.


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[Category: News]

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[l] at 7/11/19 3:30am

WHITE CONE, Ariz.

Navajo Times | Rima Krisst

David Clark was honored recently with a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Native American Church of Navajoland.

David Clark recalls his elders saying that during the creation time different herbs were put into the world for the Native people to use, including peyote.

“This peyote was created by the Holy People,” he said. “This is my medicine. It’s a spiritual connection from a person to the Holy People, to nature.

“It’s not a foreign religion,” said Clark. “It’s a Navajo traditional religion. We have a way of addressing the peyote. We have sacred names that we use.” Clark says each tribe has a name for peyote in their language.

“In Navajo, it’s Azee’,” he said. “We pray to one Holy Spirit, which is the same as God-almighty, the Creator.”

On June 22, Clark, a lifelong advocate for peyote as religious sacrament, and former president of the Native American Church of Navajoland, was honored with a Lifetime Achievement Award.


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[Category: People]

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[l] at 7/11/19 3:30am

Emotions are running high this week as the U.S. southern border-crossing crisis is at its worst. Anti-immigrant voters and President Trump and his supporters want to stop immigrants from Central America from arriving in the United States.

Why is this showdown a big surprise to us when we witnessed how Donald Trump ran his presidential campaign on this policy and won? This only further confirms that a majority of Americans share his sentiment about stopping additional immigrants into our country. While some of us feel that Trump has and is unfairly targeting Latin and Central America and that he needs be fair and prevent immigrants from Eastern Europe as well, the startling fact is many Americans are supporting Trump’s initiative due to their fear of increased taxes to support additional newcomers.

I asked Paul, my neighbor, an elderly man at Taos Pueblo in northern New Mexico for his thoughts on this controversy. Taos County has a huge population of Hispanic and Latino residents and Taos Pueblo is sandwiched into this population somewhere.

Before answering my question, Paul spat and thoughtfully gazed at the Sangre de Cristo range, which is the tail end of the Rocky Mountains that frames his beloved pueblo. Solemnly, he called on the Honduran people to stay put in their country. “Three centuries ago when the soldiers came, they made us look into the muzzles of their guns. We suffered starvation. They took our lands by forced removal marches, and even slavery on the Pueblo people, but we didn’t run. We couldn’t run. We had to hold on to our land because that was all we had,” he noted.

As much as I want to disagree, he has a valid argument. What would have happened if our forefathers and great-grandmothers gave up all the land in this country and submerged themselves into the culture of the ‘White’ newcomers? Although Native people’s plight in this country remains far from ideal, their place in history is that they fought nobly for their land and kept the old ways of life.

I think my neighbor is also cautious about the environmental stress such as pollution and water depletion if this country accepts sudden massive numbers of immigrants. For Paul’s hometown, in recent years it has come to sharing one of its rivers with the town of Taos. “If it’s the druggies taking your land, unite and stand up to take it back. America might help you that way. And who knows – Honduras might be the ‘new America’ 20 years from now,” said Paul.

How about the presence of suffering children at the southern borders today? you ask. Sure, this tugs resoundingly at the heart – and there is a profound lesson to be learned here as well. I believe most of our ancestors used prudence by ensuring that during the times of war and instability, birth rates were kept to a minimum so children did not have to suffer needlessly.

Most importantly, Hispanic and Latin countries are Catholic. Thus, the Catholic Church has a huge responsibility in this immigrant crisis. At the very least, the church needs to change its adverse position against birth control, or contraceptives. As a church, it has discouraged couples from using birth control pills, for instance.

If the Catholic Church steps up, fewer children will suffer in the coming decades. Why does the Catholic Church always have a dominant presence in the poor countries with mass population?

Eve Little
Tachee-Blue Gap, Ariz.

A shout out for free July 4th events

A huge shout out to Leo Watchman and his staff for the free events during the 4th of July in Window Rock. I attended the gourd dance and powwow and was amazed at the huge turnout. What a successful event enjoyed by all who could attend. Thank you on behalf of all the out-of-towners and out-of-staters, especially members of other tribes.

Mike Salabile
Window Rock, Ariz.

No end to ag department corruption

There’s no end to the Department of Agriculture program corruption.

The program director supported District Grazing Committee resolution that accused me of grazing trespass violation without proof of 25 CFR 167.13 compliance that requires Navajo Nation Council Resource Development Committee to review the problem and determine if DGC and NNDA made uniform decisions before they plan to cancel my grazing permit.

Leo Watchman, NNDA program manager, failed to do his homework before he made an administrative decision to support the committee’s unjustified action. NNDA support of the grazing committee action is program mismanagement and is gross negligence of NNDA mission statement that reads “NNDA provides administrative guidance and support services to District Grazing Committees with emphasis on regulation oversight in accordance with federal regulation and Navajo Nation Code.”

NNDA program manager support of DGC action is tribal program corruption. Their action violates 25 CFR 167.13 Trespass that reads: “first offense which cannot be settled by District Grazing Committee will be referred to the Central Grazing Committee (now Navajo Nation Council Resources and Development Committee) for proper settlement out of court. Second written offense will be referred directly by District Grazing Committee to appropriate tribal court.”

The resolution lacks compliance with 25 CFR 167.13 requirements through absence of written notification and failure to consult Resource Committee for proper legislative decision prior to canceling grazing permits. Even Jerome Willie (BIA) and Ray Castillo (NNDA), technical advisors, failed to advise DGC that its decision is not justified because there is no written violation letter nor is it recorded in the annual livestock inventory record. DGC has no proof.

In fact, acceptance of DGC resolution by NNDA and BIA only proves injustice to me. Worse case scenario: RDC Office of Legislative Service staff authorized me to be on RDC’s agenda on May 29, 2019, to present my complaint in reference to interaction by RDC per 25 CFR 167.13 Trespass. At the last minute before my presentation, NNDA influenced NNDOJ to remove me off the agenda due to litigation matters.

What litigation? No litigation document was presented to me since 2009 when the dispute originated. No one ever advised that my case is in litigation. I am not a lawyer but I know the complaining party must have an attorney before a dispute is classified as litigation matter. On July 1, 2019, District 17 DGC Chair invited me to his monthly meeting to hear Resolution No. 17-07-01-2019 of terminating my grazing permit. The resolution has incompetency, errors and inconsistencies.

When I asked about Navajo Nation Code Title 3 Chapter 5-708 in the resolution Ray Castillo cited non-existing Navajo Nation Code that he says is stated in the 1966 code amendment. Internet research reveals 708 is a draft proposal for 2000 Navajo Nation Grazing Act. The proposal was not approved by Navajo Nation Council due to public hearing objections. Internet further shows Title 3 Amendments (CD-76-14) has missing 708. NNDA and DGC making their own laws is corruption.

Ray Castillo was in attendance at the May 29th meeting when I was taken off of RDC’s agenda, but on July 1 Castillo failed to advise DGC that DOJ restricted on any further action, including Resolution No. 17-07-01-2019. Ray Castillo, Jerome Willie and Calvert Curley (BIA) were at the July 1 meeting. They failed to advise the committee that NNDOJ directed this dispute issue is in litigation and that DGC to approve the resolution is out of context.

DGC resolution further referenced 25 CFR 167.8 that no one is to hold more than one grazing permit when Jerome Willie created the mess in 1991 by him approving a second permit and no one is questioning his mistake. Furthermore, no one is questioning Mr. Willie and Mr. Curley’s negligence when in 2008 they allowed District 17 trespass grazing permit as a yearlong permit in District 18.

These are gross corruption by NNDA, DGC and BIA. NNDA and BIA must prove me wrong.

Nels Roanhorse
Wildhorse Country Ranch
Oakridge, Ariz.


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[Category: Letters]

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[l] at 7/11/19 3:29am

TSE BONITO, N.M.

Complaints about last year’s Shiprock Fair were plentiful, but what many of them had in common was brusque and disrespectful treatment by former Northern Navajo Nation Fair Board President Dan Smith, who was removed from his post by Shiprock Chapter resolution last October.

Among other things, the resolution cited Smith’s “unprofessionalism” and “lack of customer service,” and called him out for creating a wedge between himself and the rest of the board, “causing discord.”

Smith disputes this. He says that he and his coordinators “did a great job,” made improvements to the fairgrounds, especially the rodeo, and addressed environmental hazards.

“We really made a change down there, but it was a lot of hard work,” said Smith, who emphasized how difficult it is to run a fair and to raise all the money that’s needed to operate it. “If they’re trying to look for a scapegoat, there’s no scapegoat,” said Smith, who’s position as president was volunteer except for gas mileage reimbursement for fair business.


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[Category: News]

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[l] at 7/11/19 3:29am

WINDOW ROCK

The demands of being a professional team roper never get old for Erich Rogers.

As one of the most traveled cowboys on the PRCA circuit, Rogers says his busy schedule does get hectic at times but it keeps him grounded.

“It does get a little tiring when you have to do some late night driving or waking up early in the morning to catch a flight,” the 2017 PRCA world champion said. “But I like having that busy schedule. It keeps me going. It’s always a good feeling when you get off a plane to go to a rodeo and compete.”

Since the official start of summer last month (June 21), Rogers has been on seven different flights, flying from rodeo to rodeo. All told, he’s competed in a dozen rodeos during a two-week stretch with heeling partner Paden Bray, a 20-year-old Granbury, Texas, cowboy.

“It’s been tough but we’ve had a lot of fun,” Rogers said of their Cowboy Christmas run, which include stops in Ponoka, Alberta, St. Paul, Oregon and Window Rock.

The pair did exceptionally well at those rodeos as they claimed the average titles in Ponoka and St. Paul. On Saturday, the duo turned in a time of 4.6 seconds at the Navajo Nation 4th of July Celebration that earned them a first-place tie with team-roping partners Josh Siggins and Junior Zambrano.

“I was a little off at the barrier but we made a good run with the steer we had,” Rogers said. “I’m just excited that we got to make a good run and to split the ‘W’ here in Window Rock, my hometown rodeo.”

Before the start of Saturday night’s final performance, Rogers and WPRA barrel racer Kassidy Dennison drew the biggest applause during introductions before a packed house.

The three-day rodeo was complimentary – free admission – with the Navajo Gaming Enterprise, CKP Insurance and the Division of Economic Development covering the cost.

“It’s amazing to see all these people pack the stands,” Rogers said. “It’s awesome that the fair let everyone in with free admission. They got to watch and partake in the rodeo.”


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[Category: Rodeo]

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[l] at 7/11/19 3:28am

WINDOW ROCK

Unless you’re completely oblivious, you’ve noticed the red “Speedway” signs popping up all over the rez above what used to be Giant gas and convenience stores.

No need to panic, says V.J. Smith, government and public affairs director for Giant of the Four Corners. The company has a new parent company — Marathon Petroleum — and the stores are being rebranded, but most things won’t change.

“The stores will be managed by the same people, the employees will be the same, and we’ll continue to source our fuel from the same source, Gallup Refinery,” Smith said.

What will change? State-of-the art security at the pumps to prevent “skimming,” a few new proprietary food items, and new in-store computers. Your Giant reward card will no longer work, but “I think people will like our new Speedway rewards program,” Smith predicted.

Also, all management trainers who train on the Navajo Nation will get cultural training from former Navajo Nation Councilman Mark Maryboy, who also has been visiting chapters to tell them about the changeover.

Maryboy said the trainers are taking their classes seriously, asking for the correct pronunciation of “Yaa’aat’eeh” and wondering how to dress appropriately so as not to offend traditional patrons.

 


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[Category: Business]

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[l] at 7/11/19 3:28am

WINDOW ROCK

Navajo Times | Donovan Quintero
Bull rider Tustin Daye leans in the direction of his bull as he makes his ride on Saturday night at the 25th Annual With Thing Championship Bullriding. Daye finished in first place with a score of 87 points.

Five former champions will headline this year’s Wild Thing Championship Bull Riding this weekend.

The iconic event starts Friday and ends on Saturday night with the gates opening at 6 p.m. at Red Rock Park.

Wild Thing promoter Larry Peterson said past winners Tustin Daye, Ryan McConnel, Lane Nobles, Rozen Nobles and Travis Briscoe will take their plunge along with 85 other bull riders during the two-day event.

“We have them coming out from 10 different states,” Peterson said. “I think there’s even a guy from Indiana.”

Eight of the bull riders scheduled to ride are international cowboys with two coming from Mexico and six from Brazil.

In the past, Peterson said he’s had a few Brazilians entered in his event and on Friday night they’ll be nodding their heads to open the chute.
“A couple of them have some well-known names,” he said.

Peterson said they also have some of the top Navajo Nation bull riders entered as half of the 90 bull riders will ride on Friday night while the other half will compete on Saturday night.

“We got quite a mix coming at us,” he said.

Entering its 26th season, Peterson said his event has been successful over the years because of two reasons.

“We take really good care of our cowboys and we really take care of our crowds,” he said.

From the start of the show to the very end, paying customers will be entertained with music, bull riding, Cowboy Poker and big pyrotechnic show that Peterson says will be bigger than ever.

“We really try to bring them an electric fun-filled show that everybody’s going to enjoy whether you’re 84 or 4 years old,” he said. “Every year we strive to bring in all that energy for everyone to enjoy. Everything we do is top-notch.”


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[Category: Rodeo]

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[l] at 7/11/19 3:27am

FRUITLAND

The Wings of America running and fitness camp facilitators are hard at work for the 2019 season.

The team, which is made up of local Navajo and Pueblo high school and college runners, has been traveling throughout New Mexico and Arizona hosting their running and fitness camps.

Dustin Martin, executive director of Wings of America, said the facilitators have had a successful first half of summer and are gearing up for the second half, with many community stops left on their list.

“They have been traveling around as usual, serving Navajo youth everywhere from as far west … we had a camp at Gap a few weeks ago,” he said. “It’s been a very busy summer, and we still have a number of camps to go.”

The camps are hosted by facilitators, which are made up of three sub-teams: Chinle Team, Shiprock Team, and Pueblo Team.

Known local runners include: Santiago Hardy from Chinle, Alisia Honyumptewa from Chinle, Autumn Harrison from Kirtland, Kolby Blackwater from Kirtland, Chamique DuBoise from Window Rock, to name a few.
While many of the facilitators are new, there are a handful who have returned to help with the summer clinics.

Martin said those who have returned and are familiar with camp operations, have made for smooth sailing at each camp site.

The ways in which the camps operate has shifted a little.

In years before, Martin said, the camps were organized through one Navajo Nation Service Unit — Shiprock. The organization now works with all service units.

Martin said the new setup has it perks.

“In the long run, it helps us respond to the request and desire of each of the service units,” he said.


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[Category: Track & Field]

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[l] at 7/11/19 3:27am

WINDOW ROCK

In 1996, Victoria Largo was hustling to sell baked goods and ice-cream in her home community of Crownpoint. Amid the hustle and bustle, her daughter came up with the idea of selling pizza.

This is something Largo had never thought of trying.

Thus, Victoria’s Pizza came into being. Her dough recipe came from her paternal grandmother and from there she experimented to create the crust she has today.

“What makes my pizza different is that we use top quality ingredients,” she said. “My crust is homemade, all from scratch. Nothing artificial. It’s all pure homemade from Bluebird flour.”

Largo’s pizza was created on the Navajo Nation through trial and error. When Largo first started to sell pizza, she would go over to their local hospital and set up on something similar to a TV food tray.

She would have up to three pizzas and sell them by the slice for $2.50. Fast-forward two decades: she has sold enough pizza to not only raise her six children but also to upgrade her digs. Largo now has an RV and concession trailer that she uses to sell.


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[Category: Business]

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[l] at 7/11/19 3:26am

NARBONA PASS, N.M.

Ty McCray felt his legs giving out while trying to conquer Goat Hill, the final steep incline of the 10K race at the 40th Annual Narbona Pass Classic.

“For some reason I felt like stopping,” the 18-year-old said.

Despite his legs “burning out,” McCray persisted as he captured his second title in a row on a cool Sunday morning.

The Miyamura alumnus beat his time last year by over a minute, crossing the finish line in 36 minutes, 40.40 seconds.

“I didn’t think I was going to repeat again,” McCray said, who was coming off a right knee injury.

That same hill bothered women’s overall winner Ali Upshaw as she refused to look at her stopwatch while going up that steep slope.

“I usually use my watch to gauge my pace but I was too tired to look at it,” said Upshaw, who finished the 6.2-mile course in 43:44.17.

Navajo Times | Donovan Quintero

Incoming St. Michael Indian School senior Ali Upshaw used her offseason training to a first-place win on Sunday at the 40th Annual Narbona Pass Classic in the 10K race. Upshaw won the race in 43:44.17.

“That hill is really hard to go up but I’ve trained here before,” she said. “I’ve ran the course three times before so I knew what to expect and I knew it was going to hurt right from the get-go. It was just a matter of not stopping.”

After ascending the top of the crest, Upshaw said she got into a rhythm and coasted from there.

“I just got into a tempo and I’m just happy with the way I finished,” she said.

In two previous tries at the 10K race, Upshaw said she was not pleased with her performance, even though she did finish third last year.

Going into Sunday’s race, she wanted to push the envelope early on.

“I wanted to get out of my comfort zone because the past two years I’ve been getting out pretty slow,” she said. “Today I was, like, ‘Let’s see how far I can push myself up the mountain and see how much I have down that hill.’”


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[Category: Track & Field]

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[l] at 7/11/19 3:25am

FRUITLAND, N.M.

It was about four years ago when a group of church and community members gathered to take back their community.

Now in it’s fifth year, iMPACT Shiprock has become a source for community involvement and sustainability for surrounding communities.

iMPACT co-coordinator Cynthia Lee said the camp has turned into an event none of those involved could have imagined.

“I never thought that this iMPACT would just take off the way it has,” she said. “It’s just exciting.”

The camp will run from July 22 to 26, 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. daily, and will take place at Shiprock High. It is open to youth ages 7 to 18 who are enrolled in the 2019-20 school year.

Pre-registration for the camp is underway and will take place at Dineh Christian Center in Shiprock from Tuesday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Pre-registration ends on July 17. On-site registration will run from July 22 to 25 at 7 a.m. Those who pre-register will receive a free T-shirt.

The camp will host sub-camps and activities in theater, arts and crafts, roller skating, bowling and swimming, to name a few. A Navajo Ninja obstacle course station will also be featured.
Lee said the foundation of the camp remains the same with some positive changes as the camp celebrates its fifth year.

New is a Blues Brothers Motorcycle Organization bike run; San Juan College outdoor sporting events; local artist Jonathan Curley’s art clinic; a huge ZUMBA event; and workshops by the Navajo Nation Special Diabetes Project and a youth triathlon.

Lee said it is exciting to see new partnerships and community involvement, especially from surrounding communities.

“Our intention was just to get people to recognize some of the resources available,” she said. “We’re just a bunch of Shiprock-loving community members who just get together, and we’re just there for the kids.”


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[Category: Health]

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[l] at 7/11/19 3:15am

For the first time in its history, Navajo Tribal Utility Authority is restricting water usage in the Window Rock area. C. Mac Eddy, director of the tribal enterprise, said his office has contacted the Navajo Police, which has agreed to help monitor the use of area residents who water their lawns.

Until further notice, the watering of lawns will only be allowed from 5 a.m. to 7 a.m. and from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. daily. Anyone caught watering their lawn outside those times will be cited and could pay a fine of up to $100.

Mac Eddy said the situation with the water supply has been getting worse for the past three years as more people move into the area and rainfall has been below normal. But the main problem is a technical one – NTUA does not have the capacity to distribute as much water as the community needs during the summer when water usage is at its highest. He stressed that if these restrictions are not enough to alleviate the situation more drastic measures may have to be taken, including turning off the water to the community completely during certain hours of the day.

Window Rock isn’t the only community on the reservation that has been having water problems, he said. Three years ago, the situation in Shiprock became so bad that NTUA had to stop delivery completely for several days and water had to be hauled in to meet the needs of the community. For a couple of days, drinking water was delivered in milk cartons. “The situation has been getting worse every year,” Mac Eddy said. “Last year we barely squeaked by.”

When asked why NTUA hasn’t taken the steps to increase its ability to deliver water to the community, Mac Eddy said it has tried but the efforts have been frustrated by bureaucratic red tape.

Two years ago, NTUA submitted an application to the Economic Development Administration for a loan that would pay 80 percent of the cost to expand its distribution system in Wimdow Rock.

But the Bureau of Indian Affairs threw up roadblocks until a new area director took over a few months ago. If the application had been approved in a timely manner, the expansion would have been completed by now, he said. What needs to be done, he said, is to drill more water wells at Hunter’s Point and spend $2 million for a pipeline to bring the water to Window Rock. That would add another 2-million-gallon capacity to the system.

The good news is that the application has been approved and work on the pipeline and drilling are expected to get underway by September and be completed by next March. In other news, Ned Hatathli took over this week as director of Navajo Community College, succeeding Bob Roessel, who has been head of the school for the past 18 months. Roessel will now become chancellor at the school.

Navajo Tribal Chairman Raymond Nakai, in a campaign speech delivered in Tohatchi this past weekend, said this was an important step for the tribe because NCC wouldn’t be a fully Native college until it was headed by an Indian. Hatathli is one of the most respected Navajo leaders. After serving in the Navy during World War II, Hatathli served on the Council representing Coal Mine Mesa and then became an educational administrator for the BIA. He has a degree in education from Northern Arizona University and is working on a master’s degree in higher education.

“There is no Navajo better qualified to be director of NCC,” Nakai said. The Navajo Times decided this week to get involved in a national Native issue, taking President Richard Nixon to task for failing to appoint a commissioner of Indian affairs. The position has been vacant for almost two years and without a permanent head, the department has been spinning its wheels and not addressing a number of issues facing Indian Country.

Part of the problem is political. Nixon is a Republican and he wanted a Republican in the position at a time when 95 percent of tribal leaders were members of the Democratic Party. However, as Dick Hardwick, the editor of the Times, pointed out in a front-page article that took up more than half the page, that still left a lot of possible candidates to choose from. Nixon had reportedly considered Peter MacDonald for the position but his Quaker faith could not get past the fact that MacDonald had three daughters with his secretary at a time he was married to someone else.

MacDonald said he was asked but turned it down, which wasn’t true. But if he had been asked, he probably would have turned it down since he had his sights on becoming tribal chairman. John Belindo, a Kiowa-Navajo who headed the National Congress of American Indians, also was pressuring Nixon to make a selection as soon as possible.

He pointed out that the longer he waited the harder the new commissioner’s job would be. The NCAI was pushing for the appointment of Arnold Spang, a member of the Northern Cheyenne Tribe. Spang was deputy director at Navajo Community College. But he didn’t get the job.

By getting involved in the controversy, Hardwick was putting himself out on a limb since he had been loaned to the tribe to be editor and was still being paid by the BIA. He got around this by saying it was the position of the Navajo Times and not his.

 


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[Category: 50 Years Ago]

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[l] at 7/11/19 12:01am
Jean M. Johnson

Jean Johnson

CROWNPOINT — Funeral services for Jean M. Johnson, 80, will be held Monday, July 15, at 10 a.m. at the Crownpoint Christian Reformed Church. Burial will follow at the Crownpoint cemetery.

Jean was born Feb. 23, 1939, in Crownpoint, into the Tsenabahilnii (Sleep Rock People Clan), born for Tó’aheedlíinii (Water Flow Together Clan). She passed away July 8, 2019, in Albuquerque. Jean attended cosmetology school and received secretarial training. She was a deacon at Crownpoint Christian Reformed Church and enjoyed her hobbies as a seamstress and quilting. Jean is survived by her daughter, Michelle R. Johnson.

Jean is preceded in death by her son, Shelton Morgan; brother, Angus Morgan; father, Cecil Morgan; and mother, Lillian Morgan.

Rollie Mortuary is in charge of arrangements.

 

Alvin Larry Charlie

Alvin Larry Charlie

BELLEMONT, Ariz. — A Celebration of Life memorial service for Alvin Larry Charlie, 80, will be held Tuesday, July 16, at the Arizona Veterans Memorial Cemetery-Camp Navajo in Bellemont, Arizona. The Navajo-Hopi Honor Riders will escort to Bellemont.

Charlie will receive military honors west of Dook’o’oosliid, the San Francisco Peaks, with his father, the late Teddy Chico. He spent young preteen life at Camp Navajo with his parents and loved this place.

Secondly, a family memorial service is scheduled Thursday, July 18, at 10 a.m. at the Bethlehem Christian Reformed Church in Tohlakai, New Mexico. Sermon will be conducted by Arnold Smallcanyon of Shonto, Arizona, at the family’s request with assistance of Navajo Police in attendance and local veterans for support.

Charlie was born Jan. 2, 1939, in Rehoboth, New Mexico, into the Tódích’íi’nii (Bitter Water Clan), born for Bit’ahnii (Folded Arms People Clan). He was the son of the late Mabel Haven Chico and the late Richard R. Charlie. Charlie was married to Kathleen Stanton. They resided in Mora, New Mexico. Charlie attended school in Flagstaff and California.

Upon graduating from school, he joined the Army and was stationed at Fort Ord, California. Later, he married Ruby Greenstone and resided in Tuba City. There he joined the Navajo Tribal Police and became sergeant and detective with the force. Eventually he was hired by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission in Phoenix.

Later, he retired to become a full-time rancher at his homestead in Tohlakai. Charlie loved to rodeo. He and co-workers of the Navajo Police started the first Western Navajo Fair in the 1960s. He loved hunting and the rancher life.

Charlie is survived by his wife, Kathleen Stanton; daughters, Lucinda A. Charlie of Shonto, and Alvina Larria Charlie of Flagstaff; son, Todd Denny of Flagstaff; brother, Melvin Chico of Tohlakai; sisters, Anna Mae Sneezer of Flagstaff, Julie Day of Ohio, Louella Harvey of Tuba City, and Gloria Dodge of Mesa, Arizona; and 10 grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren.

Charlie is preceded in death by his father, Richard R. Charlie; son, Irvin Richard Charlie; mother, Mabel Haven Chico; and Teddy Chico.

Family will receive friends and relatives on July 16 at the Cedar Crest Apartment Club House (2251 North Izabel) in Flagstaff. Family will also receive friends and relatives on July 18 at Rock Springs Chapter House from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

The family wishes to extend special thanks to the following organizations for their assistance: Christus Saint Francis Hospital, Santa Fe; Navajo Nation Police District (Tuba City), KTNN, KGAK, Arizona Veterans Memorial Cemetery-Camp Navajo, Navajo-Hopi Honor Riders, and Rock Springs Chapter House.

Riverside Funeral Home of Santa Fe is in charge of cremation.

Elliott Storm Parks Jr.

Elliott Parks Jr.

GALLUP — Funeral services for Elliott Storm Parks Jr., 25, will be held Friday, July 12, at 10 a.m. at Rollie Mortuary in Gallup. Elliott was born Sept. 2, 1993, in Mesa, Arizona, into the Tó baazhní’ázhí (Two Who Came To the Water Clan), born for Bilagaana. His nali is Bilagaana; his chei is Naakai dine’é (Mexican). He passed away July 2, 2019, in Thoreau, New Mexico.

Elliott enjoyed skateboarding, hiking, tattooing and joking with family.

Elliott is survived by his mother, Joanna Morgan; father, Elliott Storm Parks Sr.; girlfriend, Adriana Léybá; daughter, Ariel Parks; son, Isiaha Parks; sister, Anastasia Parks; aunt, Reda Galvan; uncles, Mark Galvan and Alex Galvan Jr.; cousins, Katelyn Galvan, Mariah Galvan and Markalya Jose; best friend/brother, Little River Saunders; and grandmother, Ida Galvan.

Elliott is preceded in death by his grandfather, Alex Galvan Sr. Pallbearers will be Mark Galvan, Angel Galvan, Little River Saunders, Matt Sherman, Deion Welletto and Dave Yazzie.

Donna Mae Benally

WINDOW ROCK — Funeral services for Donna Mae Benally, 78, of Fort Defiance, were held July 10 at the Methodist Church in Window Rock, with Daniel Cleveland officiating. Interment followed in Fort Defiance.

Donna was born July 5, 1941, in Gallup, into the Tábaahá (Water’s Edge Clan), born for Honágháahnii (One-Walks-Around Clan). She passed away July 5, 2019, in Gallup. Donna was a homemaker who enjoyed sewing, cooking and attending revivals.

Donna is survived by her sons, Daniel Williams, Darryl Williams and Dwayne Williams; daughters, Denise Williams, Cheryl Benally, Chelsea Draper, Cindy Draper and Vestah Tikium; and 23 grandchildren and 14 great-grandchildren.

Donna is preceded in death by her parents, Hilda Cleveland and Joe Walker; husband, Wilson Benally; Davis Williams and Nathaniel Draper. Pallbearers were Anthony Williams, Eric Williams, Harris Yazzie, Wesley Yazzie, Bradley Woody and Jeremy June. Honorary pallbearers were Daniel Williams, Darryl Williams and Dwayne Williams.

Silver Creek Mortuary was in charge of arrangements.

Frankie F. Martin Jr.

GALLUP — Funeral services for Frankie F. Martin Jr., 27, will be held today, July 11, at 10 a.m. at Rollie Mortuary in Gallup. Burial will follow at the Gallup City Cemetery.

Frankie was born Aug. 29, 1990, into the Kiyaa’áanii (Towering House Clan). His nali is Ta’neeszahnii (Tangle Clan); chei is Kiyaa’áanii. He passed away Oct. 24, 2017. Frankie enjoyed family gatherings and loved his mother’s tortillas. He will be remembered as a humble, caring and respectful little brother.

His mother will forever miss his presence for her birthday, Mother’s Day and every holiday as he always came from afar just to spend this special occasion with her and his family. We love you, brother.

Frankie is survived by his mother, Louise Benally; and sisters, Lorene Francisco, Tamie Cortez, Arlene Pearson, Theresa Benally and Joleen Benally. Frankie is preceded in death by his father, Frankie F. Martin Sr.; and grandparents, Maria and Tayilwood H. Benally. Pallbearers will be Franklin Martin Jr., Garen Fragua, Sollers J. Francisco, Jayden E. Bailey, Paul W. Pearson and Eddie Cortez.

Rollie Mortuary is in charge of arrangements.

Billy Yazzie

ST. MICHAELS, Ariz. — Funeral services for Billy Yazzie, 91, were held July 3 at the Mother of Mankind Catholic Church in St. Michaels, Arizona. Interment followed at the St. Michaels community cemetery.

Billy was born Aug. 14, 1927, in Hunter’s Point, Arizona, into the Dibélzhíní (Black Sheep Clan), born for Tl’ógí (Hairy Ones Clan). He passed away June 29, 2019, in Gallup. Billy was a sheepherder and carpenter. He worked for the railroad and with the Navajo Nation as a groundskeeper, maintenance man and carpenter.

After retirement, Billy tended to his sheep and livestock. He enjoyed football and spending time with his family.

Billy is survived by his children, Florence Jesus, Jimmy Yazzie, Robert Yazzie, Ruby Yazzie, Angela Gilmore, Della Yazzie, and William Yazzie; sister, Helen Singer; and brother, John Mose Yazzie. Billy is preceded in death by his wife, Irene P. Yazzie; and son, Lee B. Yazzie. Pallbearers were Franco Jesus, Robert Yazzie, Ronald Roanhorse Jr., Sylvester Yazzie, Cleo Gilbert, and Isaiah John.

Joshua Joseph Van Kanawite

Joshua Kanawite

ALBUQUERQUE — Funeral services for Joshua Joseph Van Kanawite, 28, of Rio Rancho, New Mexico, will be held Sunday, July 14, at 2 p.m. at the Daniels Alameda Chapel in Albuquerque. Burial will follow at the Santa Fe National Cemetery on Monday, July 15, at 9 a.m. Joshua was born April 14, 1991, in Albuquerque.

He passed away July 2, 2019, in Georgia.

Joshua attended Wherry Elementary School on the Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, Enchanted Hills Elementary in Rio Rancho, Mountain View Middle School in Rio Rancho, and Rio Rancho High School.

Joshua worked at Pizza 9 and Two Fools Tavern in Rio Rancho, and served in the U.S. Army. He enjoyed playing video games, drawing and tattooing. Joshua is survived by his mother, Freida Mae Tully; father, Orlando J. Kanawite Sr.; brother, Orlando J. Kanawite Jr.; sister, Ellisen S. Law (Kanawite); and grandmother, Lillie Billie Kanawite (Johnson).

Joshua is preceded in death by his grandfather, Thomas Joseph Kanawite. Pallbearers will be Gabriel J. Kanawite Sr., Gabriel J. Kanawite Jr., Orlando J. Kanawite Sr., Orlando J. Kanawite Jr., Fernando J. Kanawite, Troy Watson, Felipe Toledo, and Jimmy Piefer. Daniels Family Funeral Services—Alameda Mortuary is in charge of arrangements.


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[Category: Obituaries]

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[l] at 7/9/19 4:38pm

WINDOW ROCK

As vice chairman of the Law and Order Committee Otto Tso sat back down after briefly leaving the room, Committee Chair Eugenia Charles-Newton whispered, “Chief quit,” catching him up on the recent debacle.

Tso responded with a shrug.

Times File Photo
Chief of Police Phillip Francisco is sworn in Aug. 22, 2016.

Moments before, Chief of Police Phillip Francisco was frustrated after Budget and Finance Vice Chairman Raymond Smith wouldn’t allow him to finish answering questions.

“I’m done. Good luck finding someone else who can do a better job,” said Francisco in the midst of what Smith admitted was a lecture, while the rest of the committee looked on.

But those sentiments came from an exasperated Francisco who had waited for hours to give a report to the committee, only to be cut off by delegates.

Francisco, who later made it clear he has not resigned from his post, said he had no intention of quitting, but grew tired of not being given the opportunity to finish answering questions posed to him.

“I’m dedicated to the police department and the Navajo Nation,” said Francisco to the Times. “I’m here to make positive changes. Although I get frustrated with legislative leadership, I am not going to let them get in the way of improving public safety and improving the working conditions of my officers.”

It was only three years ago the Navajo Nation rejoiced when it was finally announced that a police chief was hired for the large, underfunded, understaffed police department.

This position had been vacant for nearly a decade, steered by a revolving door of acting chiefs. Finally they hired Francisco, a young Navajo who had nearly 20 years of law enforcement under his belt, having worked as an officer for the San Juan County Sheriff’s Department, city of Aztec and city of Farmington. Not to mention Francisco’s military career and his education.

“This administration really promotes bringing our highly, qualified Navajo people back and Mr. Francisco has a degree and experience on the law enforcement,” said then-Vice President Jonathan Nez after Francisco was sworn in as chief of police in 2016.

“When we brought on Jesse Delmar we recognized he had what it took to re-establish the Division of Public Safety for the better,” he said.

Delmar and Francisco, both Navajo but both having worked outside the Nation for years, were new leaders who at times found the bureaucracy of Council unappealing. But they forged on.

During Monday’s meeting it was evident that Law and Order Chair Charles-Newton wanted Delmar, who has been director since 2015, present but due to a scheduling conflict he wasn’t able to attend and Dale West, director of Criminal Investigators, attended in his place.

“The chief of police never said to anybody he quit,” said Delmar to the Times, referring to the Times’ webpage article headline, “At stormy meeting, police chief quits.”

“Contrary to what the public has heard so far that the chief has quit, it’s not correct,” Delmar said.

It was Delmar who had chosen Francisco to undertake the chief position because of his qualifications. He said he can understand why Francisco did what he did.

“I selected him because he is the best man for the job,” said Delmar. “He is doing a lot of great things. As Navajo people we need support what he is doing. A lot of good progress he’s made. We don’t need to discourage him, we need to encourage him.”


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[Category: News]

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[l] at 7/9/19 2:20pm

GALLUP

New Mexico State Police are continuing their investigation into a “use of force” incident involving three members of the Gallup Police Department.

On June 28, according to state police, at approximately 8:30 p.m., Gallup police were dispatched to the JCPenney store, which is located on the north side of the Rio West Mall, about a man identified as Rodney Lynch, 41, who was reported to be intoxicated.

Lynch, from Gallup, became combative with the officers. He was taken into custody and transported to the Gallup Detox Center.

When they arrived to the detox center, Lynch again became combative with police, the state police said.

As officers were attempting to control Lynch, a police sergeant and a patrol officer, both with the Gallup Police Department, arrived on scene.

“The sergeant noticed that Lynch appeared unconscious. The officers started first aid on Lynch and called for EMS who transported Lynch to an area hospital,” the state police statement said.

Lynch was flown to an Albuquerque hospital where he was later pronounced dead by the Office of Medical Investigator.

An investigation into how Lynch died is still under investigation by the New Mexico State Police Investigations Bureau and the OMI.

The names of the officers involved were not released. Captain Erin Toadlena-Pablo, spokesperson for the Gallup police, said the department was not going to respond to the state police’s statement because it was still an active investigation.

Toadlena-Pablo said the department’s Internal Affairs was also investigating the incident. Results of the state police’s investigation will be sent to the appropriate district attorney for review.

The three officers, one Public Service Officer, formerly known as Community Service Aid, and two police officers are currently on paid administrative leave, Toadlena-Pablo added.


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[Category: News]

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[l] at 7/9/19 10:23am

WINDOW ROCK

Unable to get a word in edgewise with delegates during Monday’s Law and Order Committee meeting, a frustrated Chief of Police Phillip Francisco took off his badge, placed it on the table and stormed out.

Before that, Francisco had asked of Delegate Raymond Smith, “Can I finish what I was saying?”

Smith refused.

“I’m sorry but I have things to do,” Francisco said. “I’ve been sitting here all day … I don’t want to be lectured.  I want to tell you what the reasons were, but I keep getting cut off. I’m done. Good luck finding someone else who can do a better job.”

As Francisco and Smith raised their voices to one another, LOC Chair Eugenia Charles-Newton and committee members Vince James and Eugene Tso did not intervene and looked on until Francisco left. Also in attendance werre Health, Education and Human Services Chair Daniel Tso and HEHSC member Pernell Halona.

What had started off as a regular report quickly escalated to a confrontation between Francisco and Smith, vice chair of the Budget and Finance Committee, who is also former vice chair of LOC.

Francisco had started to answer questions posed to him by Charles-Newton about emails about a recent case and its handling.

“This is to discuss the back-and-forth emails that got out of hand,” said Charles-Newton, who asked Francisco if he would like to go into executive session.

Francisco declined, opting to continue the discussion in public.

“We asked (Department of Public Safety Director Jesse) Delmar for three questions,” said Charles-Newton. “The question, Why was the person released? Now we have been asked as a Council why we have this revolving door.”

She was mindful of not speaking more on the case since the information to it can’t be discussed publicly.

Charles-Newton expressed her unhappiness with the response to the email — being ignored by Francisco and dismissed by Delmar — especially when the public was questioning the delegates about this particular case.

“The emails started coming,” said Charles-Newton. “As chair I won’t tolerate that. I told him (Delmar) to stop. Then you two (Francisco and Dale West, acting criminal investigators director) got involved.

“Then we had other members from other committees get involved,” she said. “I know you said because of the sensitive nature of this case you can’t release information, which we understand to an extent.”

Francisco had waited for nearly six hours for his turn to give a report to the committee. Before he started he said he was unsure what the committee wanted him to report on so he gave them a brief overview on everything Navajo Police Department is currently working on.

In the end, rather than asking questions about his report, which included an update on the police academy and field training for graduates, the recruitment process, and a new website for the police station that will be up and running soon, delegates instead wanted to discuss an email exchange between themselves and Delmar, and their flawed communication.

That discussion went on for about 45 minutes.

“Public Safety and criminal investigators need to work together to inform the public,” said Charles-Newton. “I was in Salt Lake City and in the midst of our meeting with the chief of police there he got called into doing a press conference. He did this press conference and I was in awe that this police station could provide information on this case even though it was limited.”

After hearing this, it was Francisco’s chance to answer the committee’s questions.

He first apologized that he wasn’t able to respond to Charles-Newton and her questions that day, but he had had a family emergency to deal with and the situation was handled by his deputy chief, Daryl Noon.

Committee member Eugene Tso was the first to interrupt Francisco asking that legislative counsel be present before they went further.

That’s when Smith chimed in and expressed agitation at Francisco’s statement.

He said loudly that during the 23rd Council when he was on the LOC they let Francisco and Delmar get by.

“If I was to go back to the academy and raise my hand, by golly that’s a 24-7 duty,” said Smith, who was a lieutenant with the Navajo Rangers.

“Yes, I’m lecturing you guys,” he said. “When I sat here on Law and Order we just smoothed you guys over. And you know it, because of right here, now we have a chair who says, ‘We have folks out there who want to know what’s happening.’”

Vice Chair Otto Tso had left the room before Francisco and Smith altercation began. Delmar also was not in attendance during the confrontation. Law and Order committee member Edmund Yazzie was also not present at the meeting.


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[Category: News]

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[l] at 7/4/19 3:30am

I would like to send a letter to the Navajo Times and to the general public to make them aware of the treatment I am receiving as a community member of Shiprock Chapter.

I was employed as a legislative district assistant for a brief time before I decided that that the bureaucratic nonsense was not for me.

As an LDA, I have had several encounters with the Shiprock Chapter administration and elected officials. Each time I spoke up and asked questions, I was countered with unprofessional behavior.

I have asked about written polices for chapter assistance and I did not get any answers. I have asked about project updates for community projects and I did not get any answers. I have asked why a resolution had to be typed out to specific specifications and why we could not accept a handwritten resolution from a community member who was not computer literate.

These were legitimate honest questions.

I have learned that business is business and not to take things personally. Unfortunately, this basic business principle is not known by Shiprock Chapter.

I have not been employed as an LDA for over two months now but I have had one encounter with the Shiprock Chapter staff on June 6, 2019. I was appalled at the office staff’s behavior and response to me when I went in the building to inquire about my son’s summer employment.

I was met with rude behavior and did not see any signs of customer service skills by the staff. I did post about this incident on social media and then a few weeks later I get phone calls from other community members stating that chapter officials and chapter manager started calling me a mentally unstable person and an alcoholic. This conversation has been between the chapter manager and the current LDA.

Now tell me, is this how public servants act and treat their community members? By bullying and name-calling? Their behavior really surprised me and I know there really are no avenues to make these persons accountable for their behavior.

They should be so lucky that I already acknowledge and accept myself as a recovering alcoholic and I advocate greatly for our people to live a sober life.

I also am an advocate for mental health because I openly share my story as a person who lives with anxiety disorder. I am also a sexual assault survivor and a domestic violence victim survivor. I never asked for any of these titles, but they make me who I am.

I am ashamed of the Shiprock Chapter administration for this type of behavior because this type of bullying leads to self-harm. I would not want to see them wear the badge of instigators and guilt for hurting, abusing and bullying other community members.

Again, I will say, the Shiprock Chapter staff and elected officials really do need training on ethics and customer service because I see neither of them being practiced today.
Thank you for reading my personal experience with Shiprock Chapter.

Anglene Joe
Shiprock, N.M.

Create a section by and for children

“Do what you have to do — no excuses!” is an inspiring story (June 27,2019). Thanks for sharing.

Dakota Kay demonstrates a commitment to learning similar to that of the athletes in your sports section.

Navajo educator Eugene Charley in the letter proposing year-round school also shows concern for more success in academics among Navajo people.

I am a retired Chinle teacher and current member of a nonprofit board to promote early childhood reading among Native peoples — readathome.org.

I suggest that more reading in Navajo homes would be a great start to improve academic success. You might foster this at Navajo Times by creating a section for and by children. You could review good books along with creating stories, poetry and articles parents might read aloud with their children, not as a chore, but because they are of interest to all ages.

We cannot give the educational system the full responsibility for student success. Real success comes from the kind of commitment to learning we see in Dakota Kay. These days many families are busy, too busy to read at home, they say. However, they commit large chunks of time to sports training and success.

If educational goals were to become as important as athletic goals in Navajo families, there would be no educational non-proficiency. Navajo children are as smart as any children the world over, but they are underexposed to early literacy.

You at Navajo Times could help to foster a push toward family reading with a section in your paper that every preschooler begs a parent to buy each Thursday.

We need more people like Dakota Kay. “Do what you have to do — no excuses!”

Mary Ann Conrad
Chinle, Ariz.

Editor’s note: We are open to any ideas from our readers on how to improve our service to the Navajo people and the region. We will be in contact, Ms. Conrad.


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[l] at 7/4/19 3:25am

Young Navajo with American flag in lense of sunglasses and elders in the other lense. Happy Fourth of July, sidekicks say.

Jack Ahasteen’s toon for July 4, 2019.

Select a thumbnail below to launch this year’s gallery: Jacks-cartoon-July-4 JACKCARTOON6272019 Ahasteen-cartoon-CAMELBACK6202019 JACKCARTOON061316 060519-Jacks-Cartoon JACKCARTOON053019 Jack-Ahasteen-LCRO5232019 Jack-Ahasteen-051619GRADUATION JACKCARTOON050919 Jacks-Cartoon-050119 JACKCARTOON042519 Jacks-Cartoon-041819 JACKCARTOON041119 JACKCARTOON442018a JACKCARTOON32819 jacks-cartoon-SOUL3212019 NTEC3142019 Jacs-cartoon-NGS372019 JACKCARTOON2282019 JacksCARTOON022119 JACKCARTOON021319 Jacks-Cartoon020619 JACKSCARTOON013119 Jack-cartoon-WASTE1242019 JacksCARTOON011719 Jack-1202019 Jacks-1-3-19

 See last year’s comics here.


 To read the full article, pick up your copy of the Navajo Times at your nearest newsstand Thursday mornings!

Are you a digital subscriber? Read the most recent three weeks of stories by logging in to your online account.

  Find newsstand locations at this link.

Or, subscribe via mail or online here.




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The post Comics by Jack Ahasteen appeared first on Navajo Times.

[Category: Comics, comics, Jack Ahasteen]

As of 7/16/19 8:46pm. Last new 7/15/19 12:36pm.

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