[*] [-] [-] [x] [A+] [a-]  
[l] at 8/19/22 10:44am
Enlarge / Ally debit card owners are reporting fraudulent charges at a steady cadence over the past week. (credit: Getty Images) Ben Langhofer, a financial planner and single father of three in Wichita, Kansas, decided to start a side business. He had made a handbook for his family, laying out core values, a mission statement, and a constitution. He wanted to help other families put their beliefs into a real book, one they could hold and display. So Langhofer hired web developers about two years ago and set up a website, customer relationship management system, and payment processing. On Father's Day, he launched MyFamilyHandbook.com. He's had some modest success and has spoken with larger groups about bulk orders, but business has been mostly quiet so far. That's how Langhofer knew something was wrong on Friday, August 11, when a woman from California called about a fraudulent charge. He checked his merchant account and saw nearly 800 transactions.Read 24 remaining paragraphs | Comments

[Category: Biz & IT, Features, ally bank, credit card fraud, debit card fraud, debit cards, fraud, security, shopify, Stripe]

[*] [-] [-] [x] [A+] [a-]  
[l] at 8/19/22 10:44am
Enlarge / Ally debit card owners are reporting fraudulent charges at a steady cadence over the past week. (credit: Getty Images) Ben Langhofer, a financial planner and single father of three in Wichita, Kansas, decided to start a side business. He had made a handbook for his family, laying out core values, a mission statement, and a constitution. He wanted to help other families put their beliefs into a real book, one they could hold and display. So Langhofer hired web developers about two years ago and set up a website, customer relationship management system, and payment processing. On Father's Day, he launched MyFamilyHandbook.com. He's had some modest success and has spoken with larger groups about bulk orders, but business has been mostly quiet so far. That's how Langhofer knew something was wrong on Friday, August 11, when a woman from California called about a fraudulent charge. He checked his merchant account and saw nearly 800 transactions.Read 24 remaining paragraphs | Comments

[Category: Biz & IT, Features, ally bank, credit card fraud, debit card fraud, debit cards, fraud, security, shopify, Stripe]

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[l] at 8/18/22 10:39am
Enlarge / A critical vulnerability in Zoom for MacOS, patched once last weekend, could still be bypassed as of Wednesday. Users should update again. (credit: Getty Images) It's time for Zoom users on Mac to update—again. After Zoom patched a vulnerability in its Mac auto-update utility that could give malicious actors root access earlier this week, the video conferencing software company issued another patch Wednesday, noting that the prior fix could be bypassed. Zoom users on macOS should download and run version 5.11.6 (9890), released August 17. You can also check Zoom's menu bar for updates. Waiting for an automatic update could leave you waiting days while this exploit is publicly known.Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

[Category: Biz & IT, csaba fitzl, Patrick wardle, root access, security, vulnerability, zoom]

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[l] at 8/18/22 10:20am
Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | Bloomberg) The presence of advertisements apparently won't be the only major difference between Netflix's ad-supported and ad-free plans. Text reportedly found in the code of Netflix's iPhone app suggests the ad-supported plan won't let users download movies and shows for offline viewing. The text says, "Downloads available on all plans except Netflix with ads," according to a Bloomberg report yesterday. The text was discovered by iOS developer Steve Moser, who wrote about it on his blog. Unsurprisingly, the Netflix app "code also suggests that users won't be able to skip ads—a common move in the streaming world—and playback controls won't be available during ad breaks," Bloomberg wrote. Netflix has been offering video downloads in its apps since late 2016. A Netflix spokesperson told Ars, "We are still in the early days of deciding how to launch a lower-priced, ad-supported tier and no decisions have been made. So this is all just speculation at this point."Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

[Category: Biz & IT, Netflix]

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[l] at 8/18/22 9:38am
Enlarge / Ring camera images give you a view of what's happening and, in one security firm's experiments, a good base for machine learning surveillance. (credit: Ring) Amazon quietly but quickly patched a vulnerability in its Ring app that could have exposed users' camera recordings and other data, according to security firm Checkmarx. Checkmarx researchers write in a blog post that Ring's Android app, downloaded more than 10 million times, made an activity available to all other applications on Android devices. Ring's com.ring.nh.deeplink.DeepLinkActivity would execute any web content given to it, so long as the address included the text /better-neighborhoods/. That alone would not have granted access to Ring data, but Checkmarx was able to use a cross-site scripting vulnerability in Ring's internal browser to point it at an authorization token. Next, Checkmarx obtained a session cookie by authorizing that token and its hardware identifier at a Ring endpoint and then used Ring's APIs to extract names, email addresses, phone numbers, Ring device data (including geolocation), and saved recordings.Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

[Category: Biz & IT, Amazon, computer vision, machine learning, ring, security, video surveillance]

[*] [+] [-] [x] [A+] [a-]  
[l] at 8/17/22 2:49pm
Enlarge / It's a good time to restart or update Chrome—if your tabs love you, they'll come back. (credit: Getty Images) Google announced an update on Wednesday to the Stable channel of its Chrome browser that includes a fix for an exploit that exists in the wild. CVE-2022-2856 is a fix for "insufficient validation of untrusted input in Intents," according to Google's advisory. Intents are typically a way to pass data from inside Chrome to another application, such as the share button on Chrome's address bar. As noted by the Dark Reading blog, input validation is a common weakness in code. The exploit was reported by Ashley Shen and Christian Resell of the Google Threat Analysis Group, and that's all the information we have for now. Details of the exploit are currently tucked behind a wall in the Chromium bugs group and are restricted to those actively working on related components and registered with Chromium. After a certain percentage of users have applied the relevant updates, those details may be revealed.Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

[Category: Biz & IT, chrome, google, Google Chrome, zero days, zero-day]

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[l] at 8/17/22 10:32am
Enlarge (credit: Getty Images) (Update, Aug. 18, 2:40 p.m.: Proton founder and CEO Andy Yen said in a statement: "The fact that this is still an issue is disappointing to say the least. We first notified Apple privately of this issue two years ago. Apple declined to fix the issue, which is why we disclosed the vulnerability to protect the public. Millions of people’s security is in Apple’s hands, they are the only ones who can fix the issue, but given the lack of action for the past two years, we are not very optimistic Apple will do the right thing.") Original story: A security researcher says that Apple's iOS devices don't fully route all network traffic through VPNs as a user might expect, a potential security issue the device maker has known about for years. Michael Horowitz, a longtime computer security blogger and researcher, puts it plainly—if contentiously—in a continually updated blog post. "VPNs on iOS are broken," he says.Read 13 remaining paragraphs | Comments

[Category: Biz & IT, apple, iOS, Michael horowitz, privacy, proton, protonvpn, security, VPN]

[*] [+] [-] [x] [A+] [a-]  
[l] at 8/17/22 10:32am
Enlarge (credit: Getty Images) A security researcher says that Apple's iOS devices don't fully route all network traffic through VPNs, a potential security issue the device maker has known about for years. Michael Horowitz, a longtime computer security blogger and researcher, puts it plainly—if contentiously—in a continually updated blog post. "VPNs on iOS are broken," he says. Any third-party VPN seems to work at first, giving the device a new IP address, DNS servers, and a tunnel for new traffic, Horowitz writes. But sessions and connections established before a VPN is activated do not terminate and, in Horowitz's findings with advanced router logging, can still send data outside the VPN tunnel while it's active.Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

[Category: Biz & IT, apple, iOS, Michael horowitz, privacy, proton, protonvpn, security, VPN]

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[l] at 8/16/22 4:09pm
Enlarge / Digging into bleeding-edge Chrome code has made some bloggers hopeful, but Google has been focused on its own feeds for a while now. (credit: Getty Images) Does Google enjoy teasing and sometimes outright torturing some of its products' most devoted fans? It can seem that way. Tucked away inside a recent bleeding-edge Chrome build is a "Following feed" that has some bloggers dreaming of the return of Google Reader. It's unlikely, but never say never when it comes to Google product decisions. Chrome added a sidebar for browsing bookmarks and Reading List articles back in March. Over the weekend, the Chrome Story blog noticed a new flag in Gerrit, the unstable testing build of Chrome's open source counterpart Chromium. Enabling that #following-feed-sidepanel flag (now also available in Chrome's testing build, Canary) adds another option to the sidebar: Feed.Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

[Category: Biz & IT, Tech, chrome, google, Google Chrome, Google Reader, RSS, rss reader]

[*] [+] [-] [x] [A+] [a-]  
[l] at 8/15/22 2:59pm
Enlarge / Signal's security-minded messaging app is dealing with a third-party phishing attempt that exposed a small number of users' phone numbers. (credit: Getty Images) A successful phishing attack at SMS services company Twilio may have exposed the phone numbers of roughly 1,900 users of the secure messaging app Signal—but that's about the extent of the breach, says Signal, noting that no further user data could be accessed. In a Twitter thread and support document, Signal states that a recent successful (and deeply resourced) phishing attack on Twilio allowed access to the phone numbers linked with 1,900 users. That's "a very small percentage of Signal's total users," Signal writes, and all 1,900 affected users will be notified (via SMS) to re-register their devices. Signal, like many app companies, uses Twilio to send SMS verification codes to users registering their Signal app. With momentary access to Twilio's customer support console, attackers could have potentially used the verification codes sent by Twilio to activate Signal on another device and thereby send or receive new Signal messages. Or an attacker could confirm that these 1,900 phone numbers were actually registered to Signal devices.Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

[Category: Biz & IT, signal, twilio]

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[l] at 8/15/22 10:21am
Enlarge / A critical vulnerability in Zoom for Mac OS allowed unauthorized users to downgrade Zoom or even gain root access. It has been fixed, and users should update now. (credit: Getty Images) If you're using Zoom on a Mac, it's time for a manual update. The video conferencing software's latest update fixes an auto-update vulnerability that could have allowed malicious programs to use its elevated installing powers, granting escalated privileges and control of the system. The vulnerability was first discovered by Patrick Wardle, founder of the Objective-See Foundation, a nonprofit Mac OS security group. Wardle detailed in a talk at Def Con last week how Zoom's installer asks for a user password when installing or uninstalling, but its auto-update function, enabled by default, doesn't need one. Wardle found that Zoom's updater is owned by and runs as the root user. The gist of how Zoom's auto-update utility allows for privilege escalation exploits, from Patrick Wardle's Def Con talk. It seemed secure, as only Zoom clients could connect to the privileged daemon, and only packages signed by Zoom could be extracted. The problem is that by simply passing the verification checker the name of the package it was looking for ("Zoom Video ... Certification Authority Apple Root CA.pkg"), this check could be bypassed. That meant malicious actors could force Zoom to downgrade to a buggier, less-secure version or even pass it an entirely different package that could give them root access to the system.Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

[Category: Biz & IT, Def Con, Mac, Mac OS, objective-see, Patrick wardle, security, zoom]

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[l] at 8/15/22 7:00am
Enlarge (credit: Aurich Lawson | Getty Images) I am not a data scientist. And while I know my way around a Jupyter notebook and have written a good amount of Python code, I do not profess to be anything close to a machine learning expert. So when I performed the first part of our no-code/low-code machine learning experiment and got better than a 90 percent accuracy rate on a model, I suspected I had done something wrong. If you haven't been following along thus far, here's a quick review before I direct you back to the first two articles in this series. To see how much machine learning tools for the rest of us had advanced—and to redeem myself for the unwinnable task I had been assigned with machine learning last year—I took a well-worn heart attack data set from an archive at the University of California-Irvine and tried to outperform data science students' results using the "easy button" of Amazon Web Services' low-code and no-code tools. The whole point of this experiment was to see:Read 44 remaining paragraphs | Comments

[Category: Biz & IT, Features, AI, ai/ml, AWS, feature, feature report, low code, low code no code, machine learning, ML, no code, sagamaker]

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[l] at 8/15/22 6:57am
Enlarge (credit: HUM Images | Getty) Farmers around the world have turned to tractor hacking so they can bypass the digital locks that manufacturers impose on their vehicles. Like insulin pump “looping” and iPhone jailbreaking, this allows farmers to modify and repair the expensive equipment that’s vital to their work, the way they could with analog tractors. At the DefCon security conference in Las Vegas on Saturday, the hacker known as Sick Codes is presenting a new jailbreak for John Deere & Co. tractors that allows him to take control of multiple models through their touchscreens. The finding underscores the security implications of the right-to-repair movement. The tractor exploitation that Sick Codes uncovered isn't a remote attack, but the vulnerabilities involved represent fundamental insecurities in the devices that could be exploited by malicious actors or potentially chained with other vulnerabilities. Securing the agriculture industry and food supply chain is crucial, as incidents like the 2021 JBS Meat ransomware attack have shown. At the same time, though, vulnerabilities like the ones that Sick Codes found help farmers do what they need to do with their own equipment. John Deere did not respond to WIRED's request for comment about the research.Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

[Category: Biz & IT, DRM, John Deere, right to repair]

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[l] at 8/12/22 9:45am
Enlarge / Jay Y. Lee, vice chairman of Samsung Electronics Co., leaves the Seoul Central District Court in Seoul, South Korea, on Friday. After a presidential pardon, Lee is poised to retake control of South Korea's largest commercial entity. (credit: Getty Images) Samsung Electronics Vice-Chair Jay Y. Lee received a presidential pardon Friday for his role in a 2016 political scandal, a move the South Korean government says is necessary so the country's largest chaebol can help steady the national economy. “In a bid to overcome the economic crisis by vitalizing the economy, Samsung Electronics Vice Chairman Lee Jae-yong… will be reinstated,” the Korean government stated in a joint press release from its ministries, according to Bloomberg News. Lee, 54, known as Lee Jae-yong in Korea, was arrested in February 2017 on charges that he was complicit in Samsung paying millions in bribes to various organizations tied to a presidential advisor in order to win favor for an $8 billion merger of two Samsung Group units. In August 2017, Lee was convicted of perjury, embezzlement, hiding assets outside the country, and being one of five Samsung executives who paid $6.4 million in bribes to ex-South Korean President Park Geun-hye.Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

[Category: Biz & IT, Tech, chaebol, jay y. lee, Samsung, South Korea]

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[l] at 8/11/22 4:57pm
Enlarge / This is definitely not a Razer mouse—but you get the idea. (credit: calvio via Getty Images) There has been a recent flurry of phishing attacks so surgically precise and well-executed that they've managed to fool some of the most aware people working in the cybersecurity industry. On Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday, two-factor authentication provider Twilio, content delivery network Cloudflare, and network equipment maker Cisco said phishers in possession of phone numbers belonging to employees and employee family members had tricked their employees into revealing their credentials. The phishers gained access to internal systems of Twilio and Cisco. Cloudflare's hardware-based 2FA keys prevented the phishers from accessing its systems. The phishers were persistent, methodical and had clearly done their homework. In one minute, at least 76 Cloudflare employees received text messages that used various ruses to trick them into logging into what they believed was their work account. The phishing website used a domain (cloudflare-okta.com) that had been registered 40 minutes before the message flurry, thwarting a system Cloudflare uses to be alerted when the domains using its name are created (presumably because it takes time for new entries to populate). The phishers also had the means to defeat forms of 2FA that rely on one-time passwords generated by authenticator apps or sent through text messages. Creating a sense of urgency Like Cloudflare, both Twilio and Cisco received text messages or phone calls that were also sent under the premise that there were urgent circumstances—a sudden change in a schedule, a password expiring, or a call under the guise of a trusted organization—necessitating that the target takes action quickly.Read 14 remaining paragraphs | Comments

[Category: Biz & IT, 2fa, mfa, multifactor authentication, phishing, two-factor authentication]

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[l] at 8/11/22 11:46am
Enlarge (credit: Getty Images) Meta is ever so slowly expanding its trial of end-to-end encryption in a bid to protect users from snoops and law enforcement. End-to-end encryption, often abbreviated as E2EE, uses strong cryptography to encrypt messages with a key that is unique to each user. Because the key is in the sole possession of each user, E2EE prevents everyone else—including the app maker, ISP or carrier, and three-letter agencies—from reading a message. Meta first rolled out E2EE in 2016 in its WhatsApp and Messenger apps, with the former providing it by default and the latter offering it as an opt-in feature. The company said it expects to make E2EE the default setting in Messenger by sometime next year. The Instagram messenger, meanwhile, doesn’t offer E2EE at all. Starting this week, the social media behemoth will begin testing a secure online storage feature for Messenger communication. For now, it’s available only to select users who connect using either an iOS or Android device. Users who are selected will have the option of turning it on.Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

[Category: Biz & IT, encryption, meta, privacy]

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[l] at 8/11/22 8:41am
Enlarge (credit: Anton Petrus | Getty) True 5G wireless data, with its ultrafast speeds and enhanced security protections, has been slow to roll out around the world. As the mobile technology proliferates—combining expanded speed and bandwidth with low-latency connections—one of its most touted features is starting to come in to focus. But the upgrade comes with its own raft of potential security exposures. A massive new population of 5G-capable devices, from smart-city sensors to agriculture robots and beyond, are gaining the ability to connect to the Internet in places where Wi-Fi isn't practical or available. Individuals may even elect to trade their fiber-optic Internet connection for a home 5G receiver. But the interfaces that carriers have set up to manage Internet-of-things data are riddled with security vulnerabilities, according to research presented this week at the Black Hat security conference in Las Vegas. And those vulnerabilities could dog the industry long-term. After years of examining potential security and privacy issues in mobile-data radio frequency standards, Technical University of Berlin researcher Altaf Shaik says he was curious to investigate the application programming interfaces (APIs) that carriers are offering to make IoT data accessible to developers. These are the conduits that applications can use to pull, say, real-time bus-tracking data or information about stock in a warehouse. Such APIs are ubiquitous in web services, but Shaik points out that they haven't been widely used in core telecommunications offerings. Looking at the 5G IoT APIs of 10 mobile carriers around the world, Shaik and his colleague Shinjo Park found common but serious API vulnerabilities in all of them, and some could be exploited to gain authorized access to data or even direct access to IoT devices on the network.Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

[Category: Biz & IT, Policy, 5G, APIs, wireless]

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[l] at 8/10/22 11:51am
Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | Kalief Browder) Google Fiber says it plans to expand its fiber-to-the-home Internet service to several new states for the first time since it announced a pause in construction in October 2016. The plans are pending local approvals. The Alphabet division said in a press release today that it is "talking to city leaders" in five states "with the objective of bringing Google Fiber's fiber-to-the-home service to their communities." The new states are Arizona, Colorado, Nebraska, Nevada, and Idaho. Three of those were just announced, while projects in Colorado Springs, Colorado, and Mesa, Arizona, were announced in recent months. "These states will be the main focus for our growth for the next several years, along with continued expansion in our current metro areas," Google Fiber CEO Dinni Jain wrote. "In addition, we'd also love to talk to communities that want to build their own fiber networks. We've seen this model work effectively in Huntsville and in West Des Moines, and we'll continue to look for ways to support similar efforts."Read 12 remaining paragraphs | Comments

[Category: Biz & IT, Google Fiber]

[*] [+] [-] [x] [A+] [a-]  
[l] at 8/10/22 7:00am
Enlarge / A truck delivery of fiber conduit and other materials for Jared Mauch's broadband network. (credit: Jared Mauch) Jared Mauch, the Michigan man who built a fiber-to-the-home Internet provider because he couldn't get good broadband service from AT&T or Comcast, is expanding with the help of $2.6 million in government money. When we wrote about Mauch in January 2021, he was providing service to about 30 rural homes including his own with his ISP, Washtenaw Fiber Properties LLC. Mauch now has about 70 customers and will extend his network to nearly 600 more properties with money from the American Rescue Plan's Coronavirus State and Local Fiscal Recovery Funds, he told Ars in a phone interview in mid-July.Fiber installed at one of the homes on Mauch's network. The US government allocated Washtenaw County $71 million for a variety of infrastructure projects, and the county devoted a portion to broadband. The county conducted a broadband study before the pandemic to identify unserved locations, Mauch said. When the federal government money became available, the county issued a request for proposals (RFP) seeking contractors to wire up addresses "that were known to be unserved or underserved based on the existing survey," he said.Read 25 remaining paragraphs | Comments

[Category: Biz & IT, Policy, jared mauch]

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[l] at 8/9/22 5:33pm
Enlarge (credit: Getty Images) At least two security-sensitive companies—Twilio and Cloudflare—were targeted in a phishing attack by an advanced threat actor who had possession of home phone numbers of not just employees but employees' family members as well. In the case of Twilio, a San Francisco-based provider of two-factor authentication and communication services, the unknown hackers succeeded in phishing the credentials of an undisclosed number of employees and, from there, gained unauthorized access to the company's internal systems, the company said. The threat actor then used that access to data in an undisclosed number of customer accounts. Two days after Twilio's disclosure, content delivery network Cloudflare, also headquartered in San Francisco, revealed it had also been targeted in a similar manner. Cloudflare said that three of its employees fell for the phishing scam, but that the company's use of hardware-based MFA keys prevented the would-be intruders from accessing its internal network.Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

[Category: Biz & IT, cloudflare, mult-factor authentication, phishing, twilio]

[*] [+] [-] [x] [A+] [a-]  
[l] at 8/9/22 12:01pm
Enlarge / Supply-chain attacks, like the latest PyPi discovery, insert malicious code into seemingly functional software packages used by developers. They're becoming increasingly common. (credit: Getty Images) Researchers have discovered yet another set of malicious packages in PyPi, the official and most popular repository for Python programs and code libraries. Those duped by the seemingly familiar packages could be subject to malware downloads or theft of user credentials and passwords. Check Point Research, which reported its findings Monday, wrote that it didn't know how many people had downloaded the 10 packages, but it noted that PyPi has 613,000 active users, and its code is used in more than 390,000 projects. Installing from PyPi through the pip command is a foundational step for starting or setting up many Python projects. PePy, a site that estimates Python project downloads, suggests most of the malicious packages saw hundreds of downloads. Such supply-chain attacks are becoming increasingly common, especially among open source software repositories that support a wide swath of the world's software. Python's repository is a frequent target, with researchers finding malicious packages in September 2017; June, July, and November 2021; and June of this year. But trick packages have also been found in RubyGems in 2020, NPM in December 2021, and many more open source repositories.Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

[Category: Biz & IT, Tech, GitHub, malware, npm, pypi, python, security, sigstore, software supply chain attack, supply chain attack]

[*] [-] [-] [x] [A+] [a-]  
[l] at 8/9/22 12:00pm
Enlarge / Ahhh, the easy button! (credit: Aurich Lawson | Getty Images) This is the second episode in our exploration of "no-code" machine learning. In our first article, we laid out our problem set and discussed the data we would use to test whether a highly automated ML tool designed for business analysts could return cost-effective results near the quality of more code-intensive methods involving a bit more human-driven data science. If you haven't read that article, you should go back and at least skim it. If you're all set, let's review what we'd do with our heart attack data under "normal" (that is, more code-intensive) machine learning conditions and then throw that all away and hit the "easy" button. As we discussed previously, we're working with a set of cardiac health data derived from a study at the Cleveland Clinic Institute and the Hungarian Institute of Cardiology in Budapest (as well as other places whose data we've discarded for quality reasons). All that data is available in a repository we've created on GitHub, but its original form is part of a repository of data maintained for machine learning projects by the University of California-Irvine. We're using two versions of the data set: a smaller, more complete one consisting of 303 patient records from the Cleveland Clinic and a larger (597 patient) database that incorporates the Hungarian Institute data but is missing two of the types of data from the smaller set.Read 38 remaining paragraphs | Comments

[Category: Biz & IT, Features, AI, ai/ml, AWS, feature, feature report, low code, low code no code, machine learning, ML, no code, sagemaker]

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