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[l] at 6/30/22 8:58am
Next generation zero-trust cybersecurity software eliminates network-wide device hacks and defends against critical IoT vulnerabilities MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. (NXM Labs, Inc. PR) NXM Labs, Inc., a leader in advanced cybersecurity software for connected devices, today unveiled its NXM Autonomous Securityplatform that prevents hackers from gaining unauthorized access to commercial, industrial, medical, or consumer internet of things (IoT) devices. Tested in collaboration with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology (Caltech), NXM successfully demonstrated the ability of its ground-breaking technology to enable future Mars rovers to automatically defend themselves and recover from cyberattacks. Caltech manages JPL on behalf of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). NXMs engineers worked with JPLs Artificial Intelligence, Analytics and Innovation Division, Information Technology and Solutions Directorate (ITSD), along with the Robotic Surface Mobility Group in Pasadena, CA to integrate the companys software with the navigation and ground control systems of JPLs self-driving Athena test rover. During testing, NXMs software successfully detected unauthorized attempts to gain access to the rovers autonomous navigation systems, automatically protecting the vehicle from harm in real-time without impacting normal driving operations. Tests showed that NXMs platform was capable of securing millions of devices with virtually no impact on network latency and is able to operate up to 1000x faster than other decentralized platforms previously tested by the U.S. Department of Defense under simulated battlefield conditions. NXMs technology is game-changing, said Lt. General Harry D. Raduege, Jr., USAF (Ret), former Director, Defense Information Systems Agency and CIO for the North American Aerospace Defense Command and U.S. Space Command. NXM provides a new layer of cybersecurity that enables unified command and control, as well as data interoperability, providing an unprecedented capability that we have long sought but until now wasnt possible. Lt. General Raduege serves as an advisor to NXM. The Athena test rover was developed by JPL as part of NASAs High Performance Spaceflight Computing (HPSC) program to develop new computing technologies with vastly more capabilities than current spaceflight computers. JPL engineers harnessed the advanced computing power of the rovers off-the-shelf NVIDIA Jetson edge AI platform to develop innovative, machine learning-based applications for future Mars rovers. This includes artificial intelligence software that identifies objects of scientific interest as a vehicle traverses the Martian terrain, using vision-based navigation and path planning software to significantly increase the driving distances of energy-limited rovers. Were thrilled to have collaborated with NASA JPL to show how our security can protect critical assets in space as well as here on Earth, said Scott Rankine, NXMs President and Co-founder. Our unique zero-trust and zero-touch security software is chip and cloud agnostic, enabling device manufacturers and their component suppliers to easily and cost-effectively develop the industrys most trustworthy products that can be deployed rapidly and remain secure for their entire operating lifetime. About NXM NXM Labs, Inc. provides advanced security solutions for embedded devices that enable commercial, industrial and consumer products to automatically defend themselves and recover from cyberattacks. NXM offers the industrys first Zero-Trust and Zero-Touch product development software platform designed to streamline and automate security management throughout the entire OEM supply chain and product lifecycle. For more information, visit www.nxmlabs.com

[Category: News]

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[l] at 6/30/22 8:41am
First SES C-band satellite dedicated to freeing up lower 300 MHz of C-band spectrum will ensure SES can continue providing video and data services to its customers while enabling wireless operators to quickly deploy 5G services across the US Cape Canaveral (SES PR) – SES announced today that the SES-22 satellite was successfully launched into space onboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from SpaceX’s Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida, United States, at 5:04 pm local time. The first of SES’s C-band satellites dedicated to freeing up the lower 300 MHz of C-band spectrum is built by Thales Alenia Space, and will operate in the 135 degrees West orbital slot. It will deliver TV and radio to millions of American homes and provide other critical data transmission services. SES-22 is expected to start operations by early August 2022. The launch of SES-22 is part of a broader Federal Communications Commission (FCC) program to clear a portion of C-band spectrum to enable wireless operators to deploy 5G services across the contiguous US (CONUS). In response to a mandate from the FCC, satellite operators such as SES are required to transition their existing services from the lower 300 MHz to the upper 200 MHz of C-band spectrum to make room for 5G.  To meet the FCC’s accelerated deadline of clearing C-band spectrum across the US by December 2023 while maintaining uninterrupted services, SES will launch five satellites – SES-18, SES-19, SES-20, SES-21 and SES-22 in 2022. “We are thrilled with the successful launch of SES-22, thanks to our partners at Thales Alenia Space and SpaceX,” said Steve Collar, CEO of SES. “The launch of SES-22, together with other upcoming C-band satellite launches scheduled this year, will enable us to continue providing the high-quality services that our customers have been accustomed to over the last several decades, while freeing up spectrum that will enable the US to rapidly unlock the promise of 5G.” “The successful launch of SES 22 is the result of our long-standing and fruitful collaboration with SES,” said Hervé Derrey, President and CEO of Thales Alenia Space. “This achievement reflects the robustness and flight-proven heritage of our Spacebus 4000 B2 platform combined with our ability to timely and quickly deliver SES-22, two key elements leading to the decision of SES working with us to replace its existing C-Band fleet.” The SES-22 spacecraft had a fast on-ground delivery time as satellite manufacturer Thales Alenia Space shipped it only 22 months after it was ordered. SES-22 is the seventh SES satellite launched by SpaceX over the last 10 years.

[Category: News]

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[l] at 6/30/22 8:32am
Illustration of the Cislunar Autonomous Positioning System Technology Operations and Navigation Experiment (CAPSTONE). (Credit: Tyvak Nano-Satellite Systems) LONG BEACH, Calif. (Robert Lab USA, Inc. PR) Rocket Lab USA, Inc. (Nasdaq: RKLB) (“Rocket Lab” or “the Company”), a leading launch and space systems company, today confirmed its Photon Lunar spacecraft has successfully brought the CAPSTONE satellite for NASA closer to the Moon with the completion of its fourth orbit raising maneuver. After CAPSTONE was successfully delivered to space on Rocket Lab’s Electron rocket and Photon Lunar spacecraft, NASA’s CubeSat remains attached to Photon as it periodically ignites its HyperCurie engine to accelerate the mission beyond Earth’s orbit. Today, Photon successfully completed its fourth orbit raising maneuver to bring CAPSTONE closer to the Moon – the second of two completed maneuvers within the same 24-hour period. After the next few days and successive HyperCurie engine burns, Photon will release CAPSTONE on a ballistic lunar transfer trajectory to the Moon, from which Advanced Space (which owns and operators CAPSTONE on behalf of NASA) will take over the CAPSTONE mission. About CAPSTONE: The Cislunar Autonomous Positioning System Technology Operations and Navigation Experiment (CAPSTONE) CubeSat was successfully launched to space on Rocket Lab’s Electron launch vehicle at 09:55 UTC, June 28. Designed and built by Tyvak Nano-Satellite Systems, a Terran Orbital Corporation, and owned and operated by Advanced Space on behalf of NASA, the Cislunar Autonomous Positioning System Technology Operations and Navigation Experiment (CAPSTONE) CubeSat will be the first spacecraft to test the Near Rectilinear Halo Orbit (NRHO) around the Moon. This is the same orbit intended for NASA’s Gateway, a multipurpose Moon-orbiting station that will provide essential support for long-term astronaut lunar missions as part of the Artemis program. About Rocket Lab Founded in 2006, Rocket Lab is an end-to-end space company with an established track record of mission success. We deliver reliable launch services, satellite manufacture, spacecraft components, and on-orbit management solutions that make it faster, easier and more affordable to access space. Headquartered in Long Beach, California, Rocket Lab designs and manufactures the Electron small orbital launch vehicle and the Photon satellite platform and is developing the Neutron 8-ton payload class launch vehicle. Since its first orbital launch in January 2018, Rocket Lab’s Electron launch vehicle has become the second most frequently launched U.S. rocket annually and has delivered 147 satellites to orbit for private and public sector organizations, enabling operations in national security, scientific research, space debris mitigation, Earth observation, climate monitoring, and communications. Rocket Lab’s Photon spacecraft platform has been selected to support NASA missions to the Moon and Mars, as well as the first private commercial mission to Venus. Rocket Lab has three launch pads at two launch sites, including two launch pads at a private orbital launch site located in New Zealand and a second launch site in Virginia, USA which is expected to become operational in 2022. To learn more, visit www.rocketlabusa.com.

[Category: News]

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[l] at 6/30/22 8:26am
Lack of awareness drives fear with Gen-Z more out of touch with the realities of space compared to ‘Space Age’ generation Across all ages, 1 in 3 globally ‘excited’ about space, with 1 in 9 ‘terrified’, and 1 in 5 ‘nervous’; 97 per cent see space as a threat, with space junk and climate change main concerns BRASÍLIA, Brazil (Inmarsat PR) The world is largely unaware of key activities in space, with Gen-Z twice as likely to associate space with aliens, Star Wars and billionaires like Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos than older generations, according to the largest representative survey of global consumer attitudes towards space1, unveiled by Inmarsat, the world leader in global, mobile satellite communications. The report, What on Earth is the value of space, found that those aged 65 and above, who were teenagers when humans first walked on the Moon, are more optimistic and hopeful than Gen-Z. They are more likely to associate space with research and exploration, rockets, and satellites – with their understanding of space more rooted in science than science-fiction. Only a quarter of the public (23 per cent) said they feel space exploration is ‘important’. Almost half (46 per cent) consider satellites when thinking of space, while 37 per cent think of expeditions to the Moon and Mars, 21 per cent think of aliens, and almost 1 in 10 think of Star Wars (9 per cent). Fewer than 1 in 10 people globally think of communications and connectivity. This focus on Hollywood rather than Halley’s Comet fuels how respondents feel about space. Only a third of people feel ‘excited’ about space (34 per cent), while 18 per cent feel nervous – just 38 per cent wish they knew more about ‘up there’. A quarter (24 per cent) of people feel ‘overwhelmed’ by space, which comes as no real surprise with films like Don’t Look Up recently capturing the public consciousness. Rajeev Suri, CEO of Inmarsat, said: “This report should be a wake-up call for our industry. Space appears to be underappreciated and misunderstood in the real-world. In many respects, the knowledge we possess as a society is inaccurate and incomplete. “Space can enable a better way of living for all on Earth, but public support will make or break this vital contribution to a better future. Space needs a new narrative, and it is time for us to define its value to the world. Global communities are united by their fear of uncontrolled satellite debris, falling asteroids and environmental damage. Having come so far, we cannot afford to destroy the gift of space through poor stewardship, fear, ignorance or inaction. Sustainability on Earth cannot exist without sustainability in space. Responsible space exploration and stricter regulation is a must.” People’s ambitions for space centre around solving some of our major challenges on Earth – finding new energy sources, essential resources, and helping solve climate change. However, this does not yet counteract our fears – as 97 per cent of the global population feel space is a threat. This concern is reflected in the fact that 1 in 9 people are ‘terrified’ of what could happen in space – with space junk and collisions in orbit (47 per cent), pollution (39 per cent), and damaging the Earth’s atmosphere (35 per cent) seen as the top threats. Older people are more worried about space junk, while younger generations fear the environmental impact most. It is clear that the positive impact of space is not being appreciated fully by the public. Recent space industry entrants are more optimistic about what space offers. Close to half of respondents in China believe space can provide a new source for essential resources versus a third globally, while 6 in 10 South Koreans think space can be the key to new energy sources, while half of those polled in the UAE see space as a way to help solve climate change. Over half (55 per cent) of those living in Brazil are concerned about space junk and collisions in space; 32 per cent fear space activity damaging the Earth’s atmosphere and 46 per cent worry we may end up polluting space. A good 14 per cent of Brazilians want to work in the space industry – exactly the same as the global average; a third (32 per cent) – again the same as the global figure – are hopeful about the possibilities of space; more than half of respondents – the highest score among the surveyed nations (54 per cent vs 38 per cent globally) – wish they knew more about space, and two fifths (37 per cent versus 34 per cent globally) feel excited about what could happen in space. About Inmarsat Inmarsat delivers world leading, innovative, advanced and exceptionally reliable global, mobile communications – in the air, at sea and on land – that enable a new generation of commercial, enterprise, government and mission-critical services, including the digitalisation of the maritime and aviation sectors.

[Category: News]

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[l] at 6/29/22 3:27pm
Virgin Orbit Launch Launch Vehicles: LauncherOne/Boeing 747 Cosmic GirlPayloads: 7 small satellitesCustomer: U.S. Space ForceLaunch Site: Pacific Ocean off CaliforniaLaunch Origination: Mojave Air and Space Port | Mojave, Calif.Launch Window: 10 p.m. PDT on June 29 | 1 a.m. EDT/0500 UTC on June 30Livestream: 9:45 p.m. PDT on June 29 | 12:45 p.m. EDT/0445 UTC on June 30Mission Name: Straight UpMission Number: STP-28A Mission Overview The launch will carry seven satellites from multiple government agencies that are experiments intended to demonstrate novel modular satellite bus, space domain awareness, and adaptive radio frequency technologies. The U.S. Space Force has procured this launch for the Rocket Systems Launch Program (RSLP), with payloads provided by the DoD Space Test Program (STP).  Payloads CTIM-FD: CubeSat will measure radiation Earth receives from the Sun. (University of Colorado at Boulder) Lonestar: U.S. Army Space & Missile Defense Command satellite focused on experimental tactical space support. MISR-B: spacecraft will demonstrate two-way communications with ground devices and experiment with methods to leverage small satellite capabilities. (Department of Defense) NACHOS-2: will allow scientists to detect, map, and quantify Earth’s trace gasses more easily, which is critical for volcanology and climate change research. (Los Alamos National Laboratory) Recurve: satellite propels CubeSat technology forward by demonstrating adaptive radio frequency system capability from low Earth orbit, evaluating mesh network behavior across multiple nodes to route data wherever it needs to go. (U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory) Slingshot 1: CubeSat will advance on-orbit experiments using modular & autonomous technologies on next-gen satellite systems with SatCat5, a data interface which implements Ethernet-type communication between payloads using low power serial communications. (The Aerospace Corporation)

[Category: News]

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[l] at 6/29/22 2:12pm
Atlas V for the USSF-12 mission on the launch pad. (Credit: ULA) CAPE CANAVERAL SPACE FORCE STATION, Fla. (ULA PR) A United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V 541 rocket will launch the USSF-12 mission for the U.S. Space Force’s Space Systems Command (SSC). Liftoff will occur from Space Launch Complex-41 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida.Launch Date and Time: Thursday, June 30, 2022 at 6:00 p.m. EDT (2200 UTC) LAUNCH WEBCAST Webcast begins Thursday at 5:40 p.m. EDT (2140 UTC) Mission Overview A United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V 541 rocket is launching the USSF-12 mission for the U.S. Space Force’s Space Systems Command (SSC). USSF-12 features two satellite payloads: the Wide Field of View (WFOV) Testbed for SSCs Space Sensing Directorate and the USSF-12 Ring spacecraft for the Defense Department’s Space Test Program. Atlas V will deliver both spacecraft directly to geosynchronous orbit approximately 22,000 miles (35,500 km) above the equator approximately 6 hours after liftoff. Liftoff will occur from Space Launch Complex-41 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Fla. The forward payload, WFOV, is a testbed spacecraft that informs the Next Gen Overhead Persistent Infrared program (OPIR). The Next Gen OPIR program will succeed the Space Based Infrared Systems program and is designed provide a resilient space-based global missile warning capability against emerging missile and counter-space threats. Sponsored by Space Systems Command and managed by the NASA Ames Research Center, the mid-sized WFOV spacecraft is based on Millennium’s AQUILA M8 affordable platform series and hosts a transformational OPIR six-degree staring sensor developed under a separate contract by L3Harris Technologies. The WFOV testbed is designed for a 3- to 5-year life with a total mass up to 6,613 lbs (3,000 kg) and a payload accommodation over 771 lbs (350 kg). WFOV’s primary mission in orbit is to explore future missile warning algorithms with data collected in space. The aft payload is a propulsive ESPA named the USSF-12 Ring. The Ring is a classified mission to demonstrate future technology for the Department of Defense. LAUNCH VEHICLE Payload Fairing (PLF) Credit: ULA The spacecraft are encapsulated in a 17-ft (5-m) diameter short payload fairing produced in the advanced Out-of-Autoclave manufacturing process. The 5-m PLF is a sandwich composite structure made with a vented aluminum-honeycomb core and graphite-epoxy face sheets. The bisector (two-piece shell) PLF encapsulates both the Centaur and the satellite. The vehicle’s height with the 5-meter short PLF is approximately 196 ft (59.7 m). Centaur The Centaur second stage is 10 ft (3 m) in diameter and 41.5 ft (12.6 m) in length. Its propellant tanks are pressure-stabilized and constructed of corrosion-resistant stainless steel. Centaur is a cryogenic vehicle, fueled with liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen, powered by an RL10C-1 engine producing 22,900 lbs (101.8 kilo-Newtons) of thrust. The cryogenic tanks are insulated with a combination of helium-purged blankets, radiation shields and spray-on foam insulation (SOFI). The Centaur forward adapter (CFA) provides structural mountings for the fault-tolerant avionics system and structural and electrical interfaces with the spacecraft. Booster The booster is 12.5 ft (3.8 m) in diameter and 106.5 ft (32.5 m) in length. The booster’s tanks are structurally rigid and constructed of isogrid aluminum barrels, spun-formed aluminum domes and intertank skirts. Booster propulsion is provided by the RD-180 engine system (a single engine with two thrust chambers). The RD-180 burns RP-1 (Rocket Propellant-1 or highly purified kerosene) and liquid oxygen and delivers 860,200 lbs (3.83 mega-Newtons) of thrust at sea level. Four solid rocket boosters (SRBs) generate the additional power required at liftoff, with each providing 371,550 lbs (1.6 mega-Newtons) of thrust. The Centaur avionics system, provides guidance, flight control and vehicle sequencing functions during the booster and Centaur phases of flight. FLIGHT PROFILE Credit: ULA

[Category: News]

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[l] at 6/29/22 1:48pm
The closest star system to Earth is the famous Alpha Centauri group. At a distance of 4.3 light-years, this system is made up of the binary formed by the stars Alpha Centauri A and Alpha Centauri B, plus the faint red dwarf Alpha Centauri C, also known as Proxima Centauri. NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope has given us this stunning view of the bright Alpha Centauri A (on the left) and Alpha Centauri B (on the right). (Credits: ESA/NASA) GREENBELT, Md. (NASA PR) On the heels of a successful launch on June 26, NASA is set to launch two more sounding rockets from northern Australia during the first half of July. These missions will help astronomers understand how starlight influences a planet’s atmosphere, possibly making or breaking its ability to support life as we know it. The two missions will look at Alpha Centauri A and B – two Sun-like stars near our own – in extreme- and far-ultraviolet light. Ultraviolet light, which has wavelengths shorter than the light that is visible to the human eye, is a critical factor in the search for life. A little bit of ultraviolet light can help form the molecules necessary for life, but too much can erode an atmosphere, leaving behind an inhospitable planet. “Ultraviolet radiation from the Sun played a role in how Mars lost its atmosphere and how Venus turned into a dry, barren landscape,” said Brian Fleming, astronomer at the University of Colorado, Boulder, and principal investigator for one of the missions, the Dual-channel Extreme Ultraviolet Continuum Experiment, or DEUCE. “Understanding ultraviolet radiation is extremely important to understanding what makes a planet habitable.” Of the over 5,000 exoplanets known throughout across the galaxy, only Earth is known to host life. In the search for other exoplanets that could host life as we know it, astronomers have focused on planets that orbit in the habitable zone – defined as the distances from a star where a planet’s surface temperature could support water. “But that’s a rudimentary way of characterizing habitability,” Fleming said. While water is one part of making a planet hospitable, for a planet to support an Earth-like biosphere, it also needs an atmosphere. If the habitable zone is bathed in too much ultraviolet radiation, any water vapor in the upper atmosphere could escape, quickly drying out the planet. Atmospheres can also be eroded by radiation and extreme flares from a planet’s host star, exposing the surface to harsh ultraviolet radiation, which can break apart molecules like DNA. But just how much ultraviolet radiation is emitted by different types of stars is poorly known. Without accurate knowledge, astronomers can’t accurately predict which planets might host life. “We need to understand the stars so that we can understand any planets we find there,” said Kevin France, astronomer at the University of Colorado, Boulder, and principal investigator for the Suborbital Imaging Spectrograph for Transition region Irradiance from Nearby Exoplanet host stars, or SISTINE, mission. The Spectrograph for Transition region Irradiance from Nearby Exoplanet host stars, or SISTINE, payload is being prepared for launch. (Credits: NASA Wallops) DEUCE and SISTINE will take these important measurements of ultraviolet light to help narrow the search for habitable planets. Launching only a week apart, the two missions will work together to get a full picture of the ultraviolet light coming from Alpha Centauri A and B. The researchers selected Alpha Centauri A and B because they can serve as a useful reference against which to calibrate observations from the Sun – the only other star for which we have complete ultraviolet measurements. Ultraviolet light is absorbed by dust and gas in space. This makes it nearly impossible to measure ultraviolet light from more distant stars at the level needed for these types of analyses. The Alpha Centauri system, however, is just 4.3 light-years away, close enough that much of its ultraviolet light reaches us before being absorbed. Ultraviolet light is also mostly blocked by Earth’s atmosphere, so researchers have to send instruments into space to measure it. Since the full range of ultraviolet light can’t be measured with a single instrument, DEUCE will measure the shorter, extreme-ultraviolet wavelengths and SISTINE will measure the longer, far-ultraviolet wavelengths. The wavelength coverages will slightly overlap so that the collected data can be calibrated and used as one dataset. This information will then be used to create models that can help astronomers assess which other star systems could support habitable environments. “Looking at Alpha Centauri will help us check if other stars like the Sun have the same radiation environment or if there are a range of environments,” France said. “We have to go to Australia to study it because we can’t easily see these stars from the northern hemisphere to measure them.” SISTINE is scheduled for launch July 4 and DEUCE on July 12. The two missions, aboard NASA two-stage Black Brant IX sounding rockets, will launch from the Arnhem Space Center in East Arnhem Land in Australia’s Northern Territory. The Arnhem Space Center is owned and operated by Equatorial Launch Australia, or ELA, on the land of the Yolngu, the Traditional Custodians and Landowners. Along with a third mission, the X-ray Quantum Calorimeter, or XQC, which flew June 26, these scientific studies can only be conducted from the southern hemisphere. Related Links NASA Conducting Suborbital Rocket Missions in Australia in June and July 2022NASA Sounding Rocket Mission Seeks Source of X-rays Emanating From Inner GalaxyLearn more about sounding rockets

[Category: News]

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[l] at 6/29/22 12:41pm
(Image Credit: STAR.VISION) HANGZHOU, China (STAR.VISION AEROSPACE GROUP LIMITED PR)  STAR.VISION AEROSPACE GROUP LIMITED, a Chinese space technology innovator, has recently won the second place in the Multimodal Learning for Earth and Environment (MultiEarth 2022) competition during the IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR 2022). They also topped the rankings in another track CropHarvest 2022 which focuses on crop classification, using testing data set from Kenya, Togo and Brazil. Organized by MIT Lincoln Laboratory, the MultiEarth 2022 competition focused on using machine learning to address global problems in earth and environmental monitoring such as the decline of the Amazon rainforest. Deforestation in the Amazon rainforest accounts for the largest share, contributing to reduced biodiversity, habitat loss, and climate change. Since much of the region is difficult to access, satellite remote sensing offers a powerful tool to track changes in the Amazon. stated the organizers. The workshop aims to gather a wide audience of researchers in academia, industry, and related fields to leverage remote sensing images collected by multiple sensors for positive environmental impact. The Chinese company won honors in two tracks of the MultiEarth 2022 competition, including the matrix completion and multimodal image translation, providing a new perspective for long-term monitoring of rainforest changes, and helping resolve frequently encountered headaches in optical satellite image acquisition due to dense cloud coverage. Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR), widely recognized as the worlds best known AI competition, is a technical event hosted by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) on yearly basis. Previous winners of championships include tech giants of Google, Alibaba and top research organizations across the world. Headquartered in Hangzhou, Eastern China, and specializing in  AI-driven remote sensing satellites R&D and business intelligence services, the company is dedicated to integrating state-of-the-art AI technology with the on-going revolutionized space industry. Dr. Yashu Kang, head of STAR.VISIONs AI team, said that the company hopes to use space technology to improve the earth from space, adding that as a space company, it is our first time to participate in a top-tier international competition along with many great AI companies and respective players. Achieving such a result is encouraging, which strengthens our determination of improving the remote sensing satellite and its service with AI technology.

[Category: News]

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[l] at 6/29/22 12:31pm
Designed, built and integrated by Millennium Space Systems, Wide Field of View will demonstrate missile warning technologies and techniques. (Image Credit: Millennium Space Systems) EL SEGUNDO, Calif. (Millennium Space Systems PR)  The United States Space Force (USSF) Space Systems Commands (SSC) Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO) Wide Field of View (WFOV) Testbed is scheduled to launch June 30, 2022. SSCs GEO WFOV space vehicle was designed built and integrated by Millennium Space Systems, a Boeing Company, and will inform the future Overhead Persistent Infrared (OPIR) architecture. With Wide Field of View, were advancing the technology we need to meet the growing threat environment, said Col Heather Bogstie, Senior Materiel Leader for SSCs Resilient Missile Warning, Tracking, and Defense Acquisition Delta. GEO WFOV will also let us qualify a new satellite bus for GEO at significant cost savings. Roughly, one-fourth the size of the Space Based Infrared System (SBIRS), WFOV is designed for a one to three year life in GEO. Its primary mission is to explore the ability for a single sensor to perform strategic and tactical missions simultaneously, by continuously monitoring up to one-third of the Earths surface. WFOV is also pathfinding prototype operationalization and Integrated Tactical Warning/Attack Assessment (ITW/AA) certification for future missions to follow. We are the complete small satellite package – design, build, integration, test and mission operations, said Jason Kim, chief executive officer, Millennium Space Systems. We were able to use our scalable flight-tested bus architecture to shorten WFOVs development cycle. Sponsored by SSC and managed by the NASA Ames Research Center, the mid-sized GEO spacecraft will launch aboard USSF-12, a United Launch Alliance rocket. Having previously aced environmental testing, WFOV was declared ready to ship in June 2020. The spacecraft began its journey to the launch site January 31, 2022. About Millennium Space Systems Millennium Space Systems, a Boeing Company, delivers high-performing prototype and constellation solutions across advanced national security and environmental observation missions. Founded in 2001, the companys small satellite missions support government, civil and commercial space customers needs across orbits.

[Category: News]

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[l] at 6/29/22 11:35am
Falcon 9 Transporter mission liftoff (Credit: SpaceX) CAPE CANAVERAL SPACE FORCE STATION, Fla. (SpaceX PR) SpaceX is targeting today, Wednesday, June 29 for launch of SES-22 to a geosynchronous transfer orbit from Space Launch Complex 40 (SLC-40) at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida. The two-hour launch window opens at 5:04 p.m. ET, 21:04 UTC. A backup launch opportunity is available on Thursday, June 30 with the same window. The Falcon 9 first stage booster supporting this mission previously supported the launch of one Starlink mission. After stage separation, the first stage will land on the A Shortfall of Gravitas droneship, which will be stationed in the Atlantic Ocean. You can watch the live launch webcast starting about 15 minutes before liftoff. 

[Category: News]

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[l] at 6/29/22 10:47am
New Shepard (NS-14) lifts off from Blue Origin’s Launch Site One in West Texas. (Credits: Blue Origin) SILVER SPRING, Md. (NOAA PR) Projected growth in rocket launches for space tourism, moon landings, and perhaps travel to Mars has many dreaming of a new era of space exploration. But a NOAA study suggests that a significant boost in spaceflight activity may damage the protective ozone layer on the one planet where we live.  Kerosene-burning rocket engines widely used by the global launch industry emit exhaust containing black carbon, or soot, directly into the stratosphere, where a layer of ozone protects all living things on the Earth from the harmful impacts of ultraviolet radiation, which include skin cancer and weakened immune systems in humans, as well as disruptions to agriculture and ecosystems. According to new NOAA research published in the Journal of Geophysical Research Atmospheres, a 10-fold increase in hydrocarbon fueled launches, which is plausible within the next two decades based on recent trends in space traffic growth, would damage the ozone layer, and change atmospheric circulation patterns. We need to learn more about the potential impact of hydrocarbon-burning engines on the stratosphere and on the climate at the surface of the Earth,” said lead author Christopher Maloney, a CIRES research scientist working in NOAA’s Chemical Sciences Laboratory. “With further research, we should be able to better understand the relative impacts of different rocket types on climate and ozone. Launch rates have tripled  Launch rates have more than tripled in recent decades, Maloney said, and accelerated growth is anticipated in the coming decades. Rockets are the only direct source of human-produced aerosol pollution above the troposphere, the lowest region of the atmosphere, which extends to a height of about 4 to 6 miles above the Earth’s surface.  The research team used a climate model to simulate the impact of approximately 10,000 metric tons of soot pollution injected into the stratosphere over the northern hemisphere every year for 50 years. Currently,  an estimated 1,000 tons of rocket soot exhaust are emitted annually. The researchers caution that the exact amounts of soot emitted by the different hydrocarbon fueled engines used around the globe are poorly understood.  The researchers found that this level of activity would increase annual temperatures in the stratosphere by 0.5 2° Celsius ( or approximately 1-4°Farenheit), which would change global circulation patterns by slowing the subtropical jet streams as much as 3.5%, and weakening the stratospheric overturning circulation.  This graph depicts the yearly global stratospheric black carbon burden generated by 10,000 metric tons of soot exhaust per year (black), 30,000 metric tons per year (blue), and 100,000 metric tons per year (green). The 50-year time series average is labeled directly above each line. The red shading represents the first 10 years of the simulation that are excluded from the rest of the analysis. Current spaceflight activity contribute about 1,000 tons of black carbon to the stratosphere every year. (Credit: NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory) How rocket exhaust affects the ozone layer  Stratospheric ozone is strongly influenced by temperature and atmospheric circulation, noted co-author Robert Portmann, a research physicist with the Chemical Sciences Laboratory, so it was no surprise to the research team that the model found changes in stratospheric temperatures and winds also caused changes in the abundance of ozone. The scientists found ozone reductions occurred poleward of 30 degrees North, or roughly the latitude of Houston, in nearly all months of the year. The maximum reduction of 4% occurred at the North Pole in June. All other locations north of 30° N experienced at least some reduced ozone throughout the year. This spatial pattern of ozone loss directly coincides with the modeled distribution of black carbon and the warming associated with it, Maloney said.  “The bottom line is projected increases in rocket launches could expose people in the Northern Hemisphere to increased harmful UV radiation,” Maloney said.  The research team also simulated two larger emission scenarios of 30,000 and 100,000 tons of soot pollution per year to better understand the impacts of an extremely large increase in future space travel using hydrocarbon-fueled engines, and more clearly investigate the feedbacks that determine the atmosphere’s response. Results showed that the stratosphere is sensitive to relatively modest black carbon injections. The larger emission simulations showed a similar, yet more severe disruptions of atmospheric circulation and climate loss  than the 10,000 metric ton case. Building a research foundation The study built on previous research by members of the author team. A 2010 study led by co-author Martin Ross, a scientist with The Aerospace Corporation, first explored the climate impact of an increase in soot-producing rocket launches. A second study performed at NOAA in 2017, on which Ross was a co-author, examined the climate response to water vapor emissions from a proposed reusable space launch system utilizing cleaner hydrogen-fueled rockets. “Our work emphasizes the importance of ozone depletion caused by soot particles emitted by liquid-fueled rockets,” Ross said. “These simulations change the long-held belief that spaceflight’s only threat to the ozone layer was from solid-fueled rockets. We’ve shown that particles are where the action is for spaceflight’s impacts.”   While the new research describes the influence that soot in rocket exhaust has on the climate and composition of the stratosphere, the scientists said it represents an initial step in understanding the spectrum of impacts on the stratosphere from increased space flight.   Combustion emissions from the different rocket types will need to be evaluated, they said.  Soot and other particles generated by satellites burning up when they fall out of orbit is also a growing, poorly understood source of emissions in the middle-to-upper atmosphere. These and other topics will need further research to produce a complete picture of space industry emissions and their impacts on Earth’s climate and ozone.   The study was supported by NOAA’s Earths Radiation Budget initiative.

[Category: News]

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[l] at 6/29/22 10:41am
Habitat rendering (Credit: SNC) LOUISVILLE, Colo., June 29, 2022 (Sierra Space PR) – Sierra Space, a leading commercial space company at the forefront of creating and building the future of space transportation and infrastructure for low-Earth orbit (LEO) commercialization, the Turkish Space Agency and ESEN Sistem Entegrasyon (ESEN) announced today the signing of a new Memorandum of Cooperation (MOC). The three parties will combine efforts on Sierra’s Space’s low-Earth orbit, lunar and astronaut programs. The MOC agreement outlines plans for Sierra Space and ESEN to work in partnership with the Turkish Space Agency for the next five years on a wide range of space technologies and applications, including the Dream Chaser® spaceplane and LIFE (Large Integrated Flexible Environment) habitat for future commercial LEO destinations. “This agreement with the Turkish Space Agency and ESEN is another significant step for Sierra Space as we build a technology and business platform in LEO – and in doing so – deliver affordable access to space, opening the commercial space economy to the world,” said Sierra Space CEO Tom Vice. “The work we do to advance human civilization has never been more important, and we have the unique opportunity in space to bring people together from across the world to pioneer next-generation space transportation, destinations and applications solutions.” The MOC also provides for additional collaboration on a range of initiatives, including: Space technologies and applications in areas such as remote sensing, propulsion systems, crewed space system and space communicationsSpace environment utilization on-orbit in LEO, including use of Sierra Space’s Large Integrated Flexible Environment (LIFE) space habitat moduleSending payloads to low Earth orbit (LEO) and the moonEngagement with and incubation of Turkish industry and academia in space-related business ventures, R&D, technology innovation and science campaigns “The Turkish Space Agency is proud to partner with Sierra Space and ESEN to participate in the development and execution of Sierra Space’s various projects and space technologies including the Dream Chaser spaceplane, LIFE Habitat and a range of space applications,” added Serdar Hüseyin Yıldırım, President of the Turkish Space Agency. “There are tremendous benefits for our industries and future space projects by leveraging Sierra Space capabilities and technologies, and we look forward to further collaboration with Sierra Space to identify additional opportunities where we can be active participants in the future of commercial space’s infrastructure and economy.”“Sierra Space is an industry leader in the commercial space economy, and we are delighted to continue our efforts with the company to help build the Turkish space economy,” commented Cem Ugur, Director General for ESEN. “As we work in partnership to further propel Sierra Space’s advanced technologies and commercial space projects, we can advance commercial space development for those all around the world.” In November 2021, Sierra Space secured $1.4 billion in capital, the largest Series A capital raise in 2021 and the industry’s second largest private capital raise in history. The Series A investment was led by General Atlantic, Coatue and Moore Strategic Ventures, with participation from funds and accounts managed by BlackRock Private Equity Partners and AE Industrial Partners. The funding is accelerating the development of the company’s space transportation systems – led by the Dream Chaser® spaceplane, in-space destinations for LEO commercialization, and advanced technologies and space applications, together forming a technology and business platform in space. About Sierra Space Sierra Space (www.sierraspace.com) is a leading commercial space company that is building platforms in space to benefit life on Earth. With more than 30 years and 500 missions of space flight heritage, Sierra Space is enabling the future of space transportation with Dream Chaser®, the world’s only winged commercial spaceplane. Expected to launch in 2023 on a series of NASA missions, Dream Chaser can safely carry cargo – and eventually crew – to on-orbit destinations, returning to land on compatible commercial airport runways worldwide. Sierra Space is also building the LIFE habitat, a three-story commercial habitation and science platform designed for low Earth orbit (LEO). Both Dream Chaser and LIFE are central components to Orbital Reef, a mixed-use business park in LEO being developed by principal partners Sierra Space and Blue Origin, which is expected to be operational by 2027. About ESEN ESEN, established in 2012 as an affiliated company of Sierra Nevada Corporation (SNC), develops innovative engineering solutions for aerospace, defense and security markets. ESEN products to date include GöRDES Vision Based Navigation, HFDF, Airborne COMINT, MMR, T2CAS Systems, Wide Area Surveillance Applications and GöKHUN UAS. ESEN continues to seek engineering challenges to create innovative state of the art products.

[Category: News]

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[l] at 6/29/22 4:43am
The German Space Agencys micro-launcher competition at DLR. [Credit: DLR (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0)] On June 20, 2022, the German Space Agency at DLR started the second round of the competition for small satellites to fly on micro-launchers developed and built in Germany.The competition is aimed not only at European institutions, but also at start-ups and small and medium-sized enterprises.A total of three more flights will be offered by the space companies Isar Aerospace Technologies GmbH and Rocket Factory Augsburg AG in 2023 and 2024.Focus: space travel, commercialization, start-up funding COLOGNE, Germany (DLR PR) On June 20, 2022, the German Space Agency started the second round of the competition at DLR for a free flight of small satellites on micro-launchers developed and built in Germany. This marks the beginning of the application phase for a total of three further flights, which will be offered by the space companies Isar Aerospace Technologies GmbH and Rocket Factory Augsburg AG in 2023 and 2024. This time, the competition is aimed not only at European institutions, but also at start-ups and small and medium-sized enterprises. The payload competition is an important element in the German governments small satellite strategy and a further step towards strengthening the small satellite segment in European space travel, explains Dr. Walther Pelzer, Member of the DLR Executive Board and Head of the German Space Agency at DLR. In addition to funding the German launch service providers, we are now offering institutions and companies an attractive opportunity to test their small satellite technologies in space and carry out scientific experiments. Up to 150 kilograms of mass can be launched per flight The opportunities to fly are ideal for small satellites that are to carry out scientific or commercial missions or test new technologies in space. A total mass of up to 150 kilograms can be launched on each of the three flights. This allows the flight of several small satellites, since each of them has only a low weight. The applications are evaluated by a five-person expert jury from DLR according to the competition criteria, explains Markus Wagener, head of the small satellites department at the German Space Agency at DLR. These include the scientific and technological uniqueness, the development status of the satellite or the potential of the experiments on board for applications on earth. The application deadline for the two flights in 2023 is October 15, 2022, and the winners will be announced by November 30, 2022. For the flight in 2024 there is an extended application period until April 30, 2023, the selection of the winners is planned until June 30, 2023.The first round of the payload competition took place in 2021. Five institutions from Germany, Norway and Slovenia were able to assert themselves with a total of seven small satellites. Small satellite ride-along opportunity is part of the micro-launcher competition The payload competition is embedded in the micro-launcher competition that the German Space Agency has been organizing at DLR since 2020 as part of the Boost! program of the European Space Agency ESA. The aim of this program is to promote the commercialization of European space travel and to improve the autonomy and competitiveness of companies and research institutes, especially in the area of ​​smaller payloads. The German start-ups Isar Aerospace Technologies GmbH (Spectrum carrier rocket) , Rocket Factory Augsburg AG (RFA One) and HyImpulse Technologies GmbH (SL1) were able to assert themselves in various phases of the microlauncher competition. The two rockets Spectrum and RFA One were chosen to carry out the four missions. With a length of only 28 or 30 meters and a diameter of two meters, they are designed to transport payloads weighing up to 1.5 tons and are therefore ideal for launching small satellites.

[Category: News]

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[l] at 6/29/22 3:56am
Italian Space Agency President_Giorgio Saccoccia and NASA Administrator Bill Nelson at signing ceremony. (Credit: Italian Space Agency) ROME (Italian Space Agency PR) The Italian Space Agency and NASA have signed an agreement for bilateral cooperation. The objective is the realization of a preliminary study dedicated to the development planning of the housing capacities related to the future lunar modules, the Lunar Surface Multi-Purpose Habitation (MPH) Module (s) proposed by ASI, of the Artemis program. To sign the President of ASI, Giorgio Saccoccia and the Administrator of NASA, Bill Nelson, on the sidelines of the 17th session of the Interministerial Committee for Policies relating to Space and Aerospace Research (COMINT), chaired by the Minister for Technological Innovation and the digital transition with responsibility for space and aerospace policies, Vittorio Colao and in the presence of the Minister of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation Luigi Di Maio. ASI will conduct the study with the support of the Italian industry in order to develop a project that complies with the objectives of the Artemis mission and the requirements provided by NASA. The latter will undertake to support the Agency by providing updated technical and programmatic information on the program. The Artemis program will lay the foundations for a long-term presence on the lunar surface and will use our satellite to validate the living systems in deep space, indispensable for future missions to Mars. As part of the Artemis program, NASA will conduct a mission bringing the first woman and the next man to the lunar surface, using the Space Launch System (SLS) launcher that will transport astronauts aboard the Orion capsule.

[Category: News]

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[l] at 6/28/22 9:55am
TOKYO (JAXA PR) The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has conducted the 0th selection test on 2,266 people who have passed the document selection of astronaut candidates, and as a result, the successful candidates have been determined as follows. Number of successful applicants for the 0th selection: 205 (reference) 188 males (91.7%), 17 females (8.3%)Number of people who passed the English test in the 0th selection 1,407Male 1,113 (79.1%), Female 292 (20.8%), 2 selected others (0.1%) ○ Future plans First selection: July 18th (Monday / holiday) August 9th (Tuesday), 2022 * Scheduled to be distributed in Japan (including online implementation)Second selection: Late October to early November 2022 * Scheduled to be held in Japan (JAXA Tsukuba Space Center, JAXA Tokyo Office, etc.) Please see the application guidelines for the details of the selection process. https://astro-mission.jaxa.jp/astro_selection/item/Application.pdf Breakdown of astronaut candidates by age group who passed the 0th selection Successful applicants for the 0th selection(Reference) Successful applicants for document selection(Reference) ApplicantsTotal number2052,2664,12720s or younger61 (29.8%)483 (21.3%)811 (19.7%)30s107 (52.2%)1,084 (47.8%)1,850 (44.8%)Forties31 (15.1%)513 (22.6%)973 (23.6%)50s6 (2.9%)163 (7.2%)424 (10.3%)60s and over0 (0.0%)23 (1.0%)69 (1.7%) * Since the composition ratio is rounded to the first decimal place, the total is not necessarily 100.

[Category: News]

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[l] at 6/28/22 8:47am
Cargo Dragon docked at the International Space Station. (Credit: NASA) NASA Mission Update NASA and SpaceX now are targeting no earlier than Wednesday, July 14, for launch of the CRS-25 commercial resupply services mission to the International Space Station. The new target launch date supports ongoing Dragon spacecraft inspections as well as repair and replacement of any components that could have degraded by exposure to mono-methyl hydrazine (MMH) vapor found during testing in early June. In order to allow a more detailed off-vehicle inspection of the parachutes, the SpaceX team made the decision to replace the main parachutes on this spacecraft. The new date also allows for launch of the uncrewed cargo mission for the earliest possible rendezvous opportunity with the International Space Station following the upcoming high-beta angle period when the sun angle with space station’s orbital plane causes problems with thermal and power generation at the microgravity laboratory in the planned docking attitude for visiting spacecraft. Learn more about station activities by following the space station blog, @space_station and @ISS_Research on Twitter, as well as the ISS Facebook and ISS Instagram accounts. Get weekly video highlights at: http://jscfeatures.jsc.nasa.gov/videoupdate/ Get the latest from NASA delivered every week. Subscribe here: www.nasa.gov/subscribe

[Category: News]

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